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No 63,776 


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SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Overseas edition 


America expresses ‘significant concern’ as Iraqi troops mass on Saudi border 



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JOHN CHAPMAN 










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By Martin Fletcher in Washington and Michael Evans in 


LONDON 


Iran; - °f to «*rowle<%ed link between forces would be outnumbered. 

Iraq* troops in occupied foe- Saratoga’s departure. So fir, there had been no 
Kuwait lined up on the which will involve 15,000 request for military help from 
Saudi Arabian border last sauqrs^nd'marines, and the Saudi Arabia. Kuwait had 
night. President Bosh fovaaon. of Kuwait, an originally appealed for miK- 




Kuwait lined up on the 
Saudi Arabian border last 
night. President Bush 
alerted Nato allies that he 
would consider taking 
military action in the 
Gulf if the Iraqis invaded 
any other country in the 
region. 

The troop movements 
towards Saudi Arabia^ 
spotted by American 
reconnaissance satellites, 
were disclosed by Richard 
Boucher, of the US state 
department. He said die 
new development liaised 
significant concern. 

The threat' of a militaiy 
incursion across the border 
into Saudi Arabia could force 
President Bush's band, leav¬ 
ing him no option but to take 
retaliatory imHiary action, to 
try to safeguard the country’s 
huge oil stocks, vital to the 
West 

Sources in Washington said 
that a number of contigenries 
bad been discussed; New ship 
depioynreots.to the Gulf were 
also announced yesterday. 

As a sign al increasing 
alarm is tire West ova* Iraqi 
President Saddam Hussein's 
military ambitions, two Royal 
Navy frigates were ordered 
immediately to theGnlf from 
Mombasa in Kenya asnd fte- 
nane - in - Malaysia, to im 
Hm| yori^dcstroyttr.^nd a.. 

supply . ship, OiaqgelenC ■ 

ready in Dubai. ;; j 
Apart fiein.Ocdocera: v io . 
Washington over stopping 
President Saddam's forceof 
more than 100,000 men enter¬ 
ing Saudi Arabia, there was 
growing fear over lhe safety of 
the 30,000 US citizeh^in the 
Gulf region.Mr ...Bouchert 
statement came, as several 
sources said that the daily 
intelligence briefing which Mr 
Bush receives from his nat¬ 
ional security advisers focused 
on a possible Iraqi incursion 
into Saudi Arabia. 

The Pentagon said the air¬ 
craft carrier, USS Saratoga, 
would leave next week for the 
Mediterranean. The Florida- 
based carrier is to relieve the 
USS Eisenhower, which has 
been on a routine deployment 
in the Mediterranean for six 
monthsAJ though there was 


official said it was possible the tary support from the West 
Etsenhower would not return: but yesterday appeared to be 
to the US immediately.. A: planing more reliance on dip- 
battle group led by USS lomatic pressure to force the 



si 


In depe ndence, now in the 
■ Indian Ooean^ is heading to¬ 
wards the Gulf. 

Confirmation foal Mr Btssh 
was considering a military 
response to foe Iraqis came in 
Brussels ufoen a Nato official 


ON OTHER PAGES 
Western optima; hostage 

hiWWt-... Pop* g 

Iraq’s options; defending 

the Saadis.. .Page 7 

looking to Israel ..Page 10 

Leading article_Page 11 

Letters;. ftp u 

Obituary. Page 12 

Dow slides-Page 32 


IRAQI 

raoora- 


aoefrir bases 

& 


meeting of Nato's political 
coimrimeeythat ii -was aware 
that Iraq may have designs 
beyond Kuwait and informed 
them that it has drawn- up 
contingency plans of action.” 
Another Nato official said: 
“The Americans want to make 
it dear to Iraq that they can go 
no further without risking a 

fi ght ” 

It was claimed that Ameri¬ 
can public opinion backed US 
military action; against Iraq, 
although the options available 
appeared to be limjted~Tbey 
included foe possibility of an 
amphibious assault, using ma¬ 
rines from seaborne ex¬ 
peditionary units, or flying 
airborne divisions from foe 
US.However it, was 
emphasised that the American 


COULD YOU 
SOLVE THIS 
PUZZLE 
AS FAST AS 
EINSTEIN? 

0 \C)\ 0 \Q \ 2 

6 

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the Iraqisto withdraw. 

S to-. Mr -Bush had a 30-minute 
telephone talk with King Fhhd 
Bush of Saudi Arabia on Thursday 
itary nighfSome members- of the 
oe in US Congress who attended 
Goal briefings asked yesterday 
• which of foe allies would be 
prepared to commit military 
' forces in the event of an attack 

on Saudi Arabia 
According to Pentagon of- 
: fidals.it would lake at least 45 

* _ days to mobilise and deploy to 

Ia foe Middle East a force ca- 
pabk of confronting foe 
f| Iraqis. Other Arab countries, 
12 prindpally Saudi Arabia, 
if would firca have to be pre- 
M vailed on to make their miti- 
. taiy. facilities available.“lt 

i would be a logistical night¬ 
mare. We have no mfrastruc- 
ture in foe region,” one senior 
US Army official said. 

A Pentagon official said: 
“US military operations 
would cease every place in foe 
world if we had to support any 
sizeable operation in Kuwait 
The effort for directing a 
ground confrontation would j 
be enormous.” j 

The. prospects of Wash¬ 
ington mounting immediate 
retaliatory action were coorid- 
._ eredremoie-.lt is assembling a 
^ -sigBaScanf naval force in foe 
I * region — with 15ships already 
^ foere—but the aircraft carrier, 
*** USS Invincible, cannot enter 
Pjs the Gulf and its 80 fighter and 
“TO attack aircraft would be 
up. operating at the limit of their 
range. 

The two most immediate 
concerns in Washington 
g °. were tire fate of 14 US oil 
8 a workers taken captive by foe 
invading Iraqis — the US 
rii- Embassy in Baghdad de- 
US manded to know where they 
aq, had been taken — and foe 
-ble danger of foe Iraqis moving 
Iwy into Saudi Arabia. 
to Senator Sam . Nunn, chair- 
na_ man of the Senate armed 
forces committee, said he did 
,a 8 not : think foe US had a 
““ military option “at the 
/as tnomenC-But 81 per cent of 
311 Americans told a CNN survey 

_i_ that they would support US 

military intervention. “I 
- believe our primary recourse 
should be to have intensive 
diplomatic activity,” Mr 
”T Nunn said. 

France said yesterday it 
would station two warships in 
the Gulf A corvette, or small 
gunboat, was already in the 
Gulf Another would join it 
One other military option 
was under consideration: halt¬ 
ing Iraqi oil sales by blockad¬ 
ing the export routes — 
pipelines through Turkey and 
Saudi Arabia and shipments 
from foe Gulf But it was 
recognised that such an action 




4 



: • fr: , 





m® response 
ence Saddam 


By Andrew McEwen and Robin Oakley 


would require a rare display of following reports that the US 


Ml 


Distraught Kuwaiti demonstrators with pictures of the emir outside the Iraqi embassy in west London yesterday 

invasion Tough world response 

^hakef ma y influence Saddan 

OilUiAVU B y Andrew McEwen and Robin Oakley 

\I7q | ] Cj4- FRAQ yesterday faced a secretary, said Britain would bargo on buying Iraqi oi 
Y V < 4 I 1 ' t tougher and more united support sanctions. The cabi- beginning to look likely. 

. ... * world respor.ee to its aggros- net me- ur.icr Sir Gecffrey \ *-4 a,«nn 

SHARE prices fell sharplv on sior. then it could nave ex- Howe to consider Britain's firs 24 iiot-ra that Iraq's 
WaH Street yesterdav, as news pected, improving foe chances response. Mrs Thatcher was neighbours would be < 
came of a sharp* rise in lh . at diplomatic pressure consulted by telephone in intimidated. Bui Kui 
unemployment and reports st ?P 11 threatening Colorado. partners in foe Gulf 

that the US is prepared to use Saudl Arabia. Mr Hurd said Britain would operation Council (GCC; 

force in foe Gulf to counter James Baker, foe US Sec- press for agreement on sane- demned the invasion 

further military action by Iraq, reiary of State, and Eduard lions at a European Commu- demanded an imme< 
By early afternoon in New Shevardnadze, his Soviet nity meeting in Rome today, withdrawal. 

York foe Dow Jones Indus- counterpart, issued an un- He hoped this would intensify The council - Saudi Ar 

trial Average was down 102.97 usual joint statement saying pressure on the United Na- Bahrain. Qatar. Oman, 
points at 2,761.63 in active that Moscow had cut off arms lions to adopt comprehensive wait and foe United 
trading. supplies to Baghdad, and sanctions. Thomas Pickering, Emirates — is usually r 

The Dow plunged almost 65 Washington had frozen Iraqi foe US ambassador at the UN, more cautious. “The i 
points at foe start of trading on bank accounts. The statement said foe Security Council was condemns foe Iraqi attac 
worse-than-expecled demanded that other coun- discussing economic and mil- fts sister, Kuwait, and 
unemployment figures, which tries also stop sending arms to itary sanctions which could be mands an unconditional 
confirmed fears that the US Iraq. Japan, West Germany adopted within 24 hours. immediate withdrawal c 
economy was heading towards and Italy joined America, King Husain of Jordan flew troops to their positions 
recession. The Federal Re- Britain and France in freezing t0 Baghdad for talks with fore August 1.1990.” its: 
serve Board is expected to Kuwait’s assets to prevent President Saddam Hussein The American plan u 

lower interest rates m due Iraq gaming control of them, and announced on bis return discussion at foe UN is b 

course from the present rale of Tass, in a criticism of a that Arab leaders would meet on sanctions imposed ag: 
8 pe L ce 2 1 ’ bul 11 _/ nay ** former Soviet ally that would in Jedda on Sunday to discuss Rhodesia in 1967 and or 
worried about an early move previously have been unthink- foe invasion. President Sad- |977 UN arms emb 
through the inflationary im- aye, called Baghdad “a dam is to attend. against South Africa. Any 

pact of higher oil prices. permanent source of tension”. Yesterday's moves a!! sue- action would be taken u: 

Unemployment rose rei July The Gulf slates broke their gested that President Saddam Chapter VII of the UN C 
from 53. per cent to 5.5 per silence with a strong con- may have miscalculated in t er » which provides for s 
mpni 5 ® mnalion ° f i he iov asion of assuming that foe world »ons and, in extreme c; 

Kuwait, and Egypt called on wouJd be too weak and di- military force. 

Iraq to withdraw its forces. vided to react effectively to his - 

figures follow earlier indica- Douglas Hurd, the foreign drive into Kuwait. An em- Iran softening, pa 

tions that the US economy -- 

North Sea dispute worsen: 

but sterling closed up 0.3 in 

terms of the effective rate By Kerry Gill 

loo 1 ^ THE North Sea oil industry to leave a Shell or BP platform Mr McDonald said: “It sh 
22 g 4 5 dispute worsened yesterday would be dismissed. the feeling of the men 

A 'fiwh wave of selling jLTnri?^. tha ' rolling programme of dellerminaiion to : 

developed on Wall Street i!??^ wildcat strikes had affected real solutions to the m 


FRAQ yesterday faced a 
tougher and more united 
world response to its aggres¬ 
sion than it could nave ex¬ 
pected, improving the chances 
that diplomatic pressure 
might stop it threatening 
Saudi Arabia. 

James Baker, the US Sec¬ 
retary of State, and Eduard 
Shevardnadze, his Soviet 
counterpart, issued an un¬ 
usual joint statement saying 
that Moscow had cut off arms 
supplies to Baghdad, and 
Washington had frozen Iraqi 
bank accounts. The statement 
demanded that other coun¬ 
tries also stop sending arms to 
Iraq. Japan, West Germany 
and Italy joined America, 
Britain and France in freezing 
Kuwait’s assets to prevent 
Iraq gaining control of them. 

Tass, in a criticism of a 
former Soviet ally that would 
previously have been unthink¬ 
able; called Baghdad “a 
permanent source of tension” 
The Gulf slates broke their 
silence with a strong con- 


secretary. said Britain would 
support sanctions. The cabi¬ 
net me- under Sir Gecffrcy- 
Howe to consider Britain's 
response. Mrs TKaicher was 
consulted by telephone in 
Colorado. 

Mr Hurd said Britain would 
press for agreement on sanc¬ 
tions at a European Commu¬ 
nity meeting in Rome today. 
He hoped this would intensify 
pressure on the United Na¬ 
tions to adopt comprehensive 
sanctions. Thomas Pickering, 
foe US ambassador at the UN, 
said foe Security Council was 
discussing economic and mil¬ 
itary sanctions which could be 
adopted within 24 hours. 

King Husain of Jordan flew 
to Baghdad for talks with 
President Saddam Hussein 
and announced on bis return 
foal Arab leaders would meet 
in Jedda on Sunday to discuss 
the invasion. President Sad¬ 
dam is to attend. 

Yesterday's moves a!! sug¬ 
gested that President Saddam 
may have miscalculated in 


rtemnation of the invasion of assuming that foe world 
Kuwaiti and Egypt called on would be too weak and di- 


Iraq to withdraw its forces. 
Douglas Hurd, the foreign 


vided to react effectively to his 
drive into Kuwait. An em- 


North Sea dispute worsens 


International political resolve. 

One sour note was sounded 
by Greece which said that the 
two US military bases on the 
Greek island of Crete, in 
southeastern Mediterranean, 
could not be used for any 
militaiy move by foe Ameri¬ 
cans in the Gulf But as a 
demonstration that foe new 
democratic governments in 
Eastern Europe were prepared 
to show solidarity with foe 


had told its NATO allies that 
it was prepared to take a tough 
stand in the Gulf 

The announcement, made 
at a meeting of senior NATO 
officials in Brussels to discuss 
Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, was 
foe clearest indication yet that 
Washington might move from 
economic sanctions to mili¬ 
tary action against Iraq. 

The prospect of wider mili¬ 
tary conflict in foe Guff has 


West, iho governments of raised investor’ fears of a 
Czechoslovakia and Potend disruption to oil supplies and 


announced that they were 
halting arms shipments to 
Iraq. Italy also called a halt to 
arms shipments. 


further sharp price rises. 

Dow tumbles, page 32 
Prices, page 37 


THE North Sea oil industry 
dispute worsened yesterday 
when it was reported that 
more than 1,000 workers on 
six platforms had refused to be 
flown to the mainland after 
holding a 24-hour strike. 

According to the unofficial 
offshore industry liaison com¬ 
mittee, which ordered foe 
latest wave of unrest almost 
1.300 men were staging a sit- 
in. Shell, foe company worst 
hit by the strikes, said all those 
who had taken part in foe 
would be flown ashore as 
helicopters became available, 
bul admitted some men were 
sitting in. BP said some of its 
workers had refused to fly. 

Last night foe Offshore 
Contractors Council, which 
represents management said 
that any worker who refused 


By Kerry Gill 

to leave a Shell or BP platform Mr McDonald said: “It shows 
would be dismissed. the feeling of the men and 

The rolling programme of determination to seek 


wildcat strikes had affected real sections to the many 
more than 60 platforms by problems, if the men staging 
early yesterday after thou- sit-ins were improperly 
sands of workers were called treated, further strike action 
out by the committee. Its would be accelerated, Mr Mc- 
members are fighting to im- Donald said, 
prove safety and gain union Last night, Ron Brown, 
recognition offshore. Labour MP for Leith, last 

Ronald McDonald, the night, gave his backing to foe 
group's chairman, said men sit-in. He said: “1 urge them 
on four Shell platforms had not to move until the oil 
refused to leave in spile of companies concede to their 
requests by management On demands on safety.” 


BP’s Clyde platform, 45 men 
refused to leave. The company 
said: “We sent three helicop¬ 
ters to foe Clyde platform, but 
foe men refused to go and foe 
aircraft came back empty.” 
Both companies said that oil 
production was not affected. 


• Petrol prices in the Irish 
Republic are to go up by five 
Irish pence a gallon from 
Wednesday, Des O’Malley, 
the industry minister, an¬ 
nounced. The increase is not 
related to the Gulf crisis and 
further rises are expected. 


HOW to solve the puzzle 

The different .types of fruit have different values. 
Added together they give the totals shown. Work 
out the missing total for the left hand column. 


Britain basks in hottest day on record 


Hyou can salve tflispiEZ®. V«i ratmi w bus *** 1 " t"™** 1 ** 
i iQSocisty. put out lha coupon for furthenlefails anda copy of thestif- 
J test lo' Mensa, fBEEPQST. Wafts bamffao WV21BR 

j {no stamp required). 

! NAME 




By Keren David 

THE burning question yesterday was 
whether it would become foe hottest day 
yet in Britain. At 3pm foe record feU, 
when mi unmanned meteorological of¬ 
fice station at Nailstone. near Leicester, 
read 37C (99F). one degree over ihe 
previous high set on August 9,1911. 

. Local records tumbled across foe 
country. Central London’s record set in 
1940 was broken with a reading of 35C 
(95F). Nottingham had its hottest day at 
34.7C <94F). Cambridge botanical gar¬ 
dens mid Barbourne, near Worcester 
equalled the 1911 records wth readings 
of36.7C(98F). 

William Hill, the bookmakers, stood 
to lose £150,000 when foe record was 
broken. The odds on Britain reaching 


100F this year shortened from 7/1 to 5/1 
One record still standing is 1976’s claim 
to be foe best summer on record, when 
temperatures of 89.8F were recorded on 
13 consecutive days This year is likely to 
rival I989's records as foe wannest year 
in Britain since 1659 and foe sunniest 
since 1909. 

In Barbourne, Paul Daman who runs 
foe weather station, was delighted to 
equal the British record. He said: “it was 
very exciting when it went past Thurs¬ 
day's figure and equalled foe record. 
Barbourne will go down in history now 
and it’s great to be a part of that” 

At foe London Weather Centre, foe 
central collecting point for about 200 
recording stations, there was little exeite- 
menL A computer display showed a 


constantly changing figure for foe cen¬ 
tre’s roof temperature. There was only 
the smallest flicker of interest from foe 
scientists as foe display passed London's 
record, “We're really a bit blase about all 
this," Richard Edgar, a press officer, 
said. “It's foe press and the public who 
get more interested in records ” 

Amateur weatherman around the 
country reported readings even higher 
than 99 F. Tom Non of Welwyn Garden 
City, Hertfordshire, took a reading of 
104F in the shade in his garden. 

Weather warnings and records, where to 
cod off, August exodus, page 3 
As nature intended, page 14 
Country calm, page 15 
Travel, Review page 36 



Review 

In touch with 
the people 



Schedules mean 
nothing when the 
Queen Mother, 90 
today, is offered a cup 
of tea. A profile by 
Alan Hamilton 
An official portrait 
is on page 22 of the 
main section 

Restored 
to glory 



fcargo on buying Iraqi oil was 
beginning to look likely. 

It '■-_ during the 

first 24 sMsn that Iraq's Arab 
neighbours would be easily 
intimidated. Bui Kuwau's 
partners in the Gulf Co¬ 
operation Council (GCC) con¬ 
demned foe invasion and 
demanded an immediate 
withdrawal. 

The council - Saudi Arabia, 
Bahrain. Qatar, Oman. Ku¬ 
wait and foe United Arab 
Emirates — is usually much 
more cautious. “The GCC 
condemns foe Iraqi attack on 
its sister, Kuwait, and de¬ 
mands an unconditional and 
immediate withdrawal of its 
troops to their positions be¬ 
fore August 1.1990 “ it said- 

The American plan under 
discussion at foe UN is based 
on sanctions imposed against 
Rhodesia in 1967 and on foe 
1977 UN arms embargo 
against South Africa. Any UN 
action would be taken under 
Chapter VII of the UN Char¬ 
ter, which provides for sanc¬ 
tions and, in extreme cases, 
military force. 

Iran softening, page 6 


Italian craftsmen have 
completed a 
remarkable art 
restoration exercise 


Some points of 
departure 

Is the forthcoming 
Channel tunnel forcing 
ferry companies to 
improve services? 

- - W EEKEND- 

LIVING 

When retreat 
is politic 

Caroline Jackson. Tory 
MEP. on the sanity- 
restoring benefits of her 
weekend home in 
Oxfordshire 


A passion for 
the spout 

Teapots are so popular 
they have their own 
exhibition. And their 
own design 
eccentricities 



Best job in Britain: a fan 
tester relaxes at a Pifco 
factory in Manchester 


Bunkering our 
young golfers 


P.B. ‘Laddie’ Lucas on 
the young golfers with 
nowhere to play 

-WEEKEND- 

MONEY 

Beware of the 
insurance 

Some dog owners could 
face large 

compensation claims, 
even if they have 
insurance 


H for hasty? 

The rush to get H- 
registration cars may 
have cost owners dear 
in hire purchase 
payments 

1 INDEX 1 

Arts.-.. 19 

Birtns. marriages, deaths .13 

Boating...30.31 

Business.32-35 

Court & Social..12 

Concerts. 18 

Crosswords...13,22 

In Town._14 

Leading articles..11 

Letters-- 11 

Obituary.12 

Out of Town...„.15 

Prices.37 

Sale room.17 

Sport.23-29 

TV & Radio.20.21 

Weekend Money.. 38-44 

Weather. 22 

Degrees from foe Universitv 
of Wales College of Cardiff 
will appear on Monday. 


* * * * * * 


























2 HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Senior police may 


DAVEMOXEY 



reward experience 


By Stewart Tendlek, crime correspondent 


BRI TAIN'S senior police offi¬ 
cers may receive extra money, 
as a reward far experience and 
me responsibility of their 
positions, under police pay 
proposals being considered by 
David Waddington, the home 
secretary. 

The general proposals, 
based on a formula drawn 
from national pay trends 
from May 1989 to May 1990, 
would give all ranks a basic 
9-75 per cent pay increase 
from September. Senior offi¬ 
cers from assistant chief con¬ 
stable and above could also be 
eligible for an additional 2.5 
per cent increase. The rise is 
the largest the police have 


received since 1982, and is 
almost certain to be accepted 
by the home secretary. 

It would raise the pay of a 
new constable from £9,900 a 
year to £ 10,866 a year and, at 
the other end of the scale, take 
the pay of a chief superintend¬ 
ent from a basic £31.131 to 
£34,167. In London, officers 
also get allowances worth 
another £ 2 , 100 . 

At the top of the tree the 
salary of a chief constable, 
with a force covering a 
population of up to 400,000, 
would rise from £43,749 to 
£48,009, while the man in 
charge of a large urban force 
could expect to see his salary 


Woman banister 
to run fraud office 


By Quentin Cowdry. home affairs correspondent 
THE Whitehall establishment officials should not expect to 


has broken new ground by 
appointing a leading woman 
barrister as director of the 
Serious Fraud Office. 

Barbara Mills, QC, a crim¬ 
inal barrister, has been in¬ 
volved in some of the most 
celebrated Central Criminal 
Court cases since she took silk 
in 1986. She prosecuted Mich¬ 
ael Fagan, who broke into 
Buckingham Palace in 1982 
and talked with the Queen in 
her bedroom, and was defence 
counsel in the trial of the 
murderers of the policeman 
hacked to death in the 1985 
Tottenham riot She is a 
member of the prosecution 
team in the Guinness trial. 

Before taking silk, Mrs 
Mills, aged 49. who has four 
children, was a junior Trea¬ 
sury counsel. She was called to 
the Bar in 1963. She takes up 
her new job next month, 
when John Wood, the direc¬ 
tor, becomes director of public 
prosecutions in Hong Kong. 

Mrs Mills is joining an 
organisation which, by its own 
admission, has still to reach 
maturity. Mr Wood said re¬ 
cently that the 19 lawyers and 
20 accountants under his 
direction had made great 
strides in pursuing com¬ 
plicated fraud cases but still 
had far to go to achieve their 
aim of cleaning up the City. 
He has called the team's 
prosecution record reasonable. 

The Serious Fraud Office 
has been criticised for taking 
too long to bring cases to 
court. There is also a feeling, 
which Mr Wood thinks is 
unjustified, that the team's 
“hit-rate" is uot high enough. 
He says that most big fraud 
cases are by definition difficult 
to investigate and that his 


win every case. 

Hie office was launched in 
April 1988 and has an annual 
budget of £11 million and a 
staff of around 100. Forty- 
seven of the 69 defendants it 
has prosecuted have been 
convicted. Three cases are 
part beard, 26 are awaiting 
trial or committal proceedings 
and another 32 are being 
investigated. 

Mrs Mills, who was not 
available for comment yes¬ 
terday, once said in an inter¬ 
view that no one could say 
that having children had held 
her career back. *Tve made it 
my business to put in 105 per 
cent of effort in this respect. 
I've hacked out an unusual 
role, and I think I may have 
contributed to a change in 
attitude." ■ 

Her husband. John, is a 
former deputy Labour leader 
of Camden council, and for¬ 
mer deputy chairman of the 
London Docklands Devel¬ 
opment Corporation. 



Barbara Mills: hacked 
out an unusual role 


go from £55,608 to £61.029. 
under the plan. The annual 
salary of the chief constable of 
the RUC would rise to 
£68,925 from £62,802. The 
proposals also suggest a long 
service increment for officers 
at the rank of assistant chief 
constable or above. If they 
have held their current ranks 
for three years or more, they 
would get an additional 2.5 
per cent in a scheme starting 
in August 1991. 

If the home secretary 
accepts the proposal, worth 
more than £ 1,000 a year to 
the most senior provincial 
chief constables, it will be a 
victory for the Association of 
Chief Police Officers. The 
increment was first floated 
two years ago as part of a 


package which was eventually 
watered turned down by 
Douglas Hurd, the then home 
secretary, much to the anger of 
senior police. 

They have argued that their 
pay has slipped back, com¬ 
pared with pay awards to 
other public service managers. 
Police claim extra pay is 
needed to encourage talented 
officers to make the attempt to 
reach top command and want 
extra cash to cover the de¬ 
mands of the job. 

The proposal has been 
framed to avoid putting a 
large burden on the pay bill for 
1989/90 and covers only a 
percentage of officers, but 
comes at a time when police 
performance and finances are 
under considerable examina¬ 
tion. There are already fore¬ 
casts from senior officers that, 
within a few years, the top 
ranks may be working with 
short-term contracts. 

O Policewomen in the West 
Midlands are being offered up 
to five years' maternity leave 
to counter the loss of experi¬ 
enced and trained officers as a 
result of pregnancy. The force 
is also promising that those 
■who return to work within 
three years will keep the rank 
they had reached 
Women comprise 14 per 
cent of the 6,800-strong West 
Midlands force, ar.d 22 resign 
every year for maternity rea¬ 
sons. Fifty women who have 
left during the past two years 
have been told of the new 
scheme, and three have said 
they will apply to rejoin. 

Sergeant Simon Cross, re¬ 
search and development of¬ 
ficer for the West Midlands 
force, said: "A lot of women 
gst to the stage where they 
think they could not phys¬ 
ically cope with Tunning a 
career and bringing up a child 
at the same time, so they 
resign. This scheme gives 
them five years to create a 
bond and be with their child 
until it starts school." 



Industrial 
advisers to 
be recruited 
for schools 


By David T ytler, education editor 
SENIOR industrialists from where he was impressed by the 


some of Britain's major com¬ 
panies are being recruited by 
John MacGregor, the edu¬ 
cation secretary, to set the 
standards for schools this 
decade. 

Mr MacGregor is expected 
to announce early next week 
significant changes to two of 
the government’s most im¬ 
portant advisory bodies, the 
National Curriculum Council 
(NCC) and the Schools 
Examination and Assessment 
Council iSeac). The education 
secretary believes that the two 
councils have been weighted 
in favour of the education 
establishment, with most 
members coming from uni¬ 
versities and local education 
authorities. He has decided to 
use his powers of appointment 
to shift the balance. 

At least three of the 15 
members of the NCC, which 
decides what should be taught 
in the ten compulsory subjects 
in the national curriculum, are 
to be replaced .by senior, 
managers from companies in¬ 
cluding BP and Unilever. Mr 
MacGregor is also expected to 
appoint a bead teacher from a 
school that has opted out of 
local authority control to one " 
of the councils, to show that 
he believes granvmaintamed 
schools are an increasingly 
important part of education in 
England and Wales. 

Similar changes are ex¬ 
pected at Seac, which is 


dose links between industry 
and education which have led 
to high standards of training 
not yet achieved in the AJmted 
Kingdom. He has. met senior, 
managers of Britain's, leading 
companies regriariy to seek 
their help in emuirmg . that the 
education service is England 
and Wales can meet the needs 
of 1992: - 

Mr MacGrtgor has said that 
Britain wfll only 
hold it? own ra the single 
European market if it has. a 
highly-trained workforce. He 
has now concluded that this 
can only 'be achieved if in¬ 
dustry has a voice in wbat 
children are taught.. 

A department of education 
insider said: “He believes the 
schools must, be given a 
clearer idea of what the needs 
of industry are and then - 
provide the school-leavers 
they need. These appoint¬ 
ments are one way of helping 
to achieve this." 

The members of. the two 
councils serve for between one- 
and three years. The appoint¬ 
ments will be seen-as an 
answer to his right-wing 
Conservative critics who clai¬ 
med that be has gone soft on 
the reforms introduced by 
Kenneth .Baker, his 
predecessor. 


Up, up and away: Pilots competing in the world hot-air airship championships 
manoeuvring sedately but with precision at 12mph yesterday round Hardwick 
village church in Che grounds of Clumber Park, Nottin ghams hire 


Vicars back Carey 
over assessments 


By Ruth Gledhill, religious affairs reporter 


NEARLY all Church of Eng¬ 
land clergymen believe that 
they should be assessed regu¬ 
larly and most believe they 
should be removed from of¬ 
fice if they are substandard, 
according to a diocesan survey 
published yesterday. 

The results are in line with 
the views of Dr George Carey, 
Archbishop of Canterbury 
designate, who has said that 
vicars and other incumbents 
should have regular compet¬ 
ency tests. Most of the 200 
clergymen responding to the 
survey, in the diocese of Chel¬ 
msford. said they -were inad¬ 
equately supervised. Nine out 
often called for regular assess¬ 
ments and six out of ten said 


£2.3m for 
orphaned 
daughter 


A YOUNG woman received 
£23 million yesterday from 
her father’s will, four months 
after her family died in an 
aircraft crash. 

Sarah LiUey's father Nor¬ 
man. aged 45, a self-made 
millionaire, her mother Susan, 
aged 44, brother Marie, aged 
24, and his fiancee Marie 
Wilson were all killed after 
their aircraft broke up in mid¬ 
air over Bayeux, Normandy, 
as the party flew back to their 
home at Amplefonh, North 
Yorkshire, from the family 
villa in Spain. 

Geoff Grower, a family 
friend for more than 20 years, 
said yesterday: “The crash 
came a few weeks before the 
family were to have a double 
celebration for Sarah's 21st 
birthday and Norman and 
Susan's silver wedding anni¬ 
versary. She told me she is 
back working as a mobile 
hairdresser, which is good 
news." 


• The £1.571.282 record 
damages awarded in the High 
Court last week to John 
Lambert, a former airline pilot 
who was paralysed in a motor¬ 
cycle accident, is to be chal¬ 
lenged in the Court of Appeal. 

A spokesman for the insur¬ 
ers of Devon county council 
the highway authority respon¬ 
sible for the road where the 
accident happened nine years 
ago, said it would also appeal 
against the refusal of Judge 
Black, QC to allow it to 
contest the daim on liability. 


EC tews coidd cost £1 bn 

in 



By Melinda Wittstock. media correspondent 


LEGISLATION being drafted 
in Brussels restricting advert¬ 
ising of alcohol tobacco, food, 
pharmaceuticals and even 
childrens' toys in the Euro¬ 
pean Community has come 
under attack by the Advertis¬ 
ing Association. Britain's in¬ 
dustry trade body. 

Advertising revenue in the 
UK alone could fall by more 
than £1 billion if directives 
banning tobacco advertising 
and severely restricting al¬ 
cohol and pharmaceutical 
advertising are adopted, the 
association said yesterday. 

The Advertising Associ¬ 
ation said that there was “a 
real and imminent danger" 
that the EC would adopt the 
most restrictive of national 
regulations throughout the 
Community, such as the 
Greek ban on advertising of 
toys on television or France's 
ban on television advertising 
of alcohol. It fears the EC will 
also restrict all alcohol 
advertising in the press. 

In a study published yes¬ 
terday, A Freedom Under 
Threat? — Advertising in the 
EC. the association warned 
that £800 million worth of 
alcohol advertising revenue 
was at risk. Another £200 
million would be lost if the EC 
implements a ban restricting 
press and poster advertising of 
tobacco products. MEPs 
across the Community have 
already proposed a complete 
ban on tobacco advertising, 
including a ban on sponsor¬ 


ship. Italy and Portugal have 
already instituted such a ban 
and France, Belgium and 
Spain are to follow suit by the 
end of this >e»T. 

Another directive would 


stop food manufacturers 


claiming their products have 
nutritiv- value. Claims which 
cannot b? substantiated, 
claims that everyday foods 
cannot supply adequate nu¬ 
trition. ciaims that "knock" 
other foods, and claims that a 
foodstuff has acquired extra 
nutritive value from additives 
will be illegal. “It will stop us 
from telling consumers why 
our produce are good for 
them." the study said. 

Richard Wade, director gen¬ 
eral of the Advertising Associ¬ 
ation, said: “To deny con¬ 
sumers advertising that is 
legal, decent, honest and 
truthful is denying the basic 
right to inform. If detailed 
legislation stifles the ability of 
companies to market their 
wares freely, the EC institu¬ 
tions could justifiably be ac¬ 
cused of erecting barriers to 
market entry, hardening 
monopoly positions where 


they exist, discouraging prod¬ 
uct innovation and stagnating 
market shares — in other 
words, of enhancing all the 
negative qualities of the orig¬ 
inal fragmented European 
markcL" 

The study, which exhorts all 
L'K advertisers to lobby their 
M Ps and MEPs to fight the EC 
proposals, said: "Each new 
Jaw or ban encourages others. 
If we don't challenge some of 
the proposals coming out we 
fail both ourselves and the 
industry." 


9 Saatchi & Saatchi has fore¬ 
cast that Spain will overtake 
France as the fifth biggest 
advertising spender in the 
world bv 1992 The Saatchi 
study also forecast that expen¬ 
diture on advertising through¬ 
out Europe will have grown to 
£33.4 billion a year - £13.5 
billion more than was spent 
last year. By 2001, the Euro¬ 
pean advertising market will 
be larger than the US marker, 
if European expenditure con¬ 
tinues fo grow at 11 per cent 
and the US maintains its 
sluggish five per cent rale. 


they should be fired if their 
work was not satisfactory. 

Nearly half said stipends 
were too low to meet the needs 
of parochial clergy. Clergy in 
Chelmsford earn about £300 
above the national minimum 
of £10,500, but more than 
third said stipends were too 
low to encourage enough 
people to join the ministry 
More than a third said they 
should be allowed to buy their 
own homes instead ofliving in 
tied accommodation. Six out 
of ten, however, were unwill¬ 
ing to lose the independence 
and benefits associated with 
the parson’s freehold to 
qualify for the rights and 
safeguards they would have as 
employees. 

Canon John Williams, team 
rector at Forest Gate and a 
former chairman of the House 
of Clergy in the Chelmsford 
Diocesan Synod, said vicars 
wanted to be “more normal 
and treated like other people. 

“I thought it was rather 
good for 62 per cent of the 
clergy 19 be happy to be fired if 
they did not come up to 
scratch, although many made 
the point that help should be 
offered first This gives a 
different view of the clergy to 
the one many people have bad 
in the past. The church is 
changing and that is reflected 
in the appointment of Dr 
Carey. He is a man who is 
close to the grass roots." 

He said many argued that 
pay should not be important 
in a vocational career, but one 
clergyman questioned wheth¬ 
er there was an "essential link 
between vocation and pov¬ 
erty". Others said that they 
did not mind poverty but felt 
their families should not be 
forced to suffer too. 

Canon Williams said: “A 
neighbour of mine has just 
been to Dorset in a tent. A 
camping holiday was all he 
could afford. Many cleigy 
would like to feel they had 
enough money to buy a retire¬ 
ment home and pay off a 
mortgage while they are 
working." 


Clifford Long ley, page 10 


Cardinal’s 
Oxford 
dream is 
realised 


responsible for overseeing the 
GCSE and A-levels and the 
introduction of the com¬ 
pulsory tests to be introduced 
alongside the national curricu¬ 
lum. These changes will prob¬ 
ably be limited to two of the 
15 council members. 

The minister has been 
working on the changes since 
his return from West Ger¬ 
many earlier this summer, 


A HUNDRED years after his 
death, one of the dearest hopes 
of Cardinal John Henry New¬ 
man is to be realised with the 
foundation in Oxford of 
Roman Catholic oratory as a 
centre of prayer and. study 
(Ruth Gledhill writes). 

Newman, a fellow of Oriel 
College, was one of the 
founders of the Oxford Move¬ 
ment that sought to revive 
Christian tradition and ritual 
in Anglicanism. The move¬ 
ment. sometimes called the 
Tractarians. marked the start 
of the Anglo-Catholic party in 
the Church of England. 

After Newman's conversion 
to Rome he avoided the city in 
which he had spent many 
years as an Anglican priest, 
but he always hoped to open a 
religious house there similar 
to his oratory at Birmingham 
and to the Brampton Oratory 
in London. His wishes were 
frustrated by members of the 
English Catholic hierarchy 
who opposed the idea of 
Roman Catholics being edu¬ 
cated at Oxford. 

A priest from the Birm¬ 
ingham Oratory has been 
invited to take charge of the 
parish of St AJoysius, Oxford, 
and to start the oratory in the 
Large house attached to the 
church. The Birmingham 
fathers will send two priests 
and a student to Oxford from 
September. The Most Rev 
Maurice Couve de Murville, 
Roman Catholic Archbishop 
of Birmingham, invited the 
fathers to send a priest to St 
AJoysius 100 years after the 
death of Cardinal Newman on 
August 11 1890. Oxford 
University honoured New¬ 
man’s memory with a series of 
public lectures and a formal 
dinner earlier this year. 

O A leading religious publish¬ 
ing company. Darton, 
Longman and Todd, is now 
owned by its staff. The compa¬ 
ny’s founder. Michael 
Longman, who died in 1978, 
left his majority shareholding 
10 the company with instruc¬ 
tions for a move to common 
ownership. 


Library 
pleas go 
unheard 


By Simon Tait 
ARTS CORRESPONDENT 


THE British Library is to 
resist pleas by eminent schol¬ 
ars to retain the round reading 
room oF the British Museum 
as its main humanities re¬ 
search centre. 

A private report compiled 
by a committee including 
Lord Jenkins of Billhead, Sir 
Isttiah Berlin, Lord Blake and 
Lord Thomas of Swynnerton 
has been sent to David MeUor, 
the arts minister. The report 
calls for the reading room in 
Bloomsbury to be retained by 
the British library when the 
first phase of its new St 
Pan eras building opens In 
1993. 

A spokesman for the library 
said yesterday that it would be 
impossible to accede to the 
request at this stage. “We have 
discussed the possibilities of 
keeping the reading room with 
experts in great derail over at 
least the last year, and they are 
not practical. It would mean a 
major redesign of Professor 
Colin St John Wilson's build¬ 
ing, and we are too far along 
the road to make changes now, 

Ptnn if tiMa timnlorl ** 


£lm credit 
card fraud 



even if we wanted to. 

He said the £25 minion 
saving that the report claims 
would be made by ferrying the 
100 million volumes to the 
new building and removing 
the new humanities reading 
room from the design is 
questionable. The advantages 
of providing better, and fester, 
services to readers and 
improving storage conditions 
in the new building, would be 
lost, he said, and in the long 
term the expense of running 
two sites would cost more 
than the claimed savings. 

The room will not be de¬ 
stroyed, however, but is to 
revert to the British Museum, 
where a committee of staff and 
trustees is compiling a report 
on its future. The committee 
is likely to recommend it 
becomes a study centre. 


T PP*V 

JL 'is* 


A TEENAGE baker who duped bankers 
into issuing him with ilUU.OOO worth of 
water shares and a £900.000 cheque 


duped bank in £!m shares prank 


walked free from a court yesu?rda> after 
being fined £300 with £250 costs. 


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d L 


Judge Gibbs said that the case was 
exceptional and bizarre. He was amazed 
that bank officials had been fooled by a 
simple prank and said he would not send 
the youth to prison because he was 
satisfied the episode had bced intended 
as a prank. 

Malik Larbe. aged 19. had just £6 in 
his account when he applied for £1 
million worth of shares when Severn 
Trent Water Authority was privatised 
last October. Larbe. from The Scotland*, 
Wolverhampton, admitted charges of 
stealing a £900.000 cheque belonging to 
Lloyds Bank and an interim share 
certificate belonging to Severn Trent 
PLC. 

Trevor Davies, for the prosecution, 
told Wolverhampton Crown Court that 
Larbe had completed an application 
form for £1 million of shares and wrote 


out 2 Co-op Bank cheque from his 
brother's account. 

"The cheque was in the sum of £1 
million, signed by the defendant. In fact 
the bank account had been closed in 
January of last year and there was 
nothing in the account. 

'The application was processed by the 
NatWest Bank and forwarded to Lloyds 
Bank for completion. This particular 
share issue was over-subscribed, so all 
the share applications were scaled down. 
The defendant's share application was 
scaled down to £ 100,000 of shares and a 
share certificate was sent to his address 
together with a refund cheque for 
£900,000," he said. 

Mr Davies said that when Larbe 
received the donimenis he took them to 
Barclays Bank in Wolverhampton and 
tned to sell the shares and cash the 
cheque. A bank official became sus¬ 
picious and made further enquiries, 
which revealed that Larbe had just £6 in 
his Barclays account. Police were alerted 
and the teenager was arrested. 


Peter De Milie. for the defence, said 
that Larbe had been planning to buy 
£200 worth of shares with holiday 
money he was owed by his employer. 
When that money was not paid, out of a 
sense of frustration and "for the hefl of 
it”, he had applied for £! million of 
shares, using a cheque of his brother’s 
from an account that had been dosed. 

"it is astonishing that a cheque on a 
personal account for £1 million sent by 
him in a name that does not appear on 
that cheque should have been accepted 
and that the shares should have been 
issued. And perhaps even more so, that 
the refund for £900,000 should have 
been sent to him before the cheque had 
been cleared," Mr De Milie said. 

Three days after the cheque and 
certificate arrived, Larbe took them to 
Bardays Bank in Wolverhampton where 
he had an account containing just £ 6 . 

“Even at that stage he wasn't wholly 
expecting the bank to honour the 
documents that would have given him 
£1 million in cash " ho aririwt 



Credit card holders 1 
keepers were 
terday of a £1 
involving more 
unsigned Access 
cards. Tbe cards' 
two mailbag 
London to Exeter, 
which bags bound 1 *^ 
from Access at Soatheaflajad 
TSB Visa at Brig$q$jpcre 
snatched. ..vi. • r. - 

The police did nbt know 
bow many carts were missing, 
and most have not appeared 
on the blacklist of stolen cards 
because they have yet to be 
reported. Detectives . want 
cardholders .in Devon, who 
have not received replace¬ 
ments due in June to report 
the feet to their banks. 

All the carts were with 
details of their credit limits, 
and it is feared thty may 
indude some “no limit” gold 
carts. A major fraud enquiry 
is now-under way; • 

Driver impaled 

A lorry driver was killed 
yesterday when he was im¬ 
paled on a metal tube. The 
man aged 45 was sitting in his 
cab at Dudley Tube, Bilston, 
West Midlands, when a load 
of steel tubing slipped as it was 
hoisted on to Iris wagon. West 
Midlands police said a length 
of tubing crashed through the 
rear of the cab and speared 
him through the back, killing 
him instantly. He has not been 
named. 


Captain fined 

Kalervo_ Puskala, a Finnish- 
born sea captain, returned to 
his ship, which is anchored in 
a Spanish port, after being- 
fined £1,500 with £500 costs at - 
Truro Crown Court yesterday . 
for getting drank on vodka 
after the 2£00 ton Bonita ran 
aground on rocks. The vessel 
went off course after leaving 
harbour-in Fowey, Cornwall 
last October, and ran aground 
at Polridmouth Cove. 

Driving ban 

Lord Henry Norreys, heir to 
the fourteenth Earl of Lindsey 
and Abingdon, was banned 
from driving for three years 
and four months by Maryle- 
bone magistrates’ court, in : 
central London, yesterday. 
Lord Norreys, aged 32, of 
Sorn, Mauchline, Ayrshire, • 
was arrested after a party on 
June 22 when he was found to 
be driving after having con- > 
sumed more than double the 
legal alcohol limit. 


Rock fall escap e 

Brian Foidslon, aged 55 , was 


recovering yesterday after a 
boulder weighing : \Vi tons 
tumbled 300 yards fiom the 
Great- Onrie headland and 
smashed the roof of of his car 
in Ty Gwyn Road, Llan¬ 
dudno, North Wales. Mr 
Foulston, an insurance collec¬ 
tor, of Cambrian Drive, Rhos- 
on-Sea, Colwyn Bay, escaped 
with a head cut needing five 
stitches, but the car may bean, 
“sura** write-off - . • 


( CORRECTION 


A ^photograph in today’s Sat- 
urday Review: shows Neil 
Simon with his former wife, 
Marsha Mason; not Diane 
Simon, his current wife. 


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cheque for £1 million. 


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HOME NEWS 



* ___yoflng keeping cool in the river Cam at Cambridge yesterday. Elsewhere in the country an ice- making machine overheated and a life-sized waxwork knight melted into a puddle 


The best 
of enemies 

“None of this would have 
happened if Wallis 
Simpson hadn't blown in 
from Baltimore." was the 
reaction of the Queen 
Mother when as 
Elizabeth. Duchess of 
York she found herself at 
the centre of a crisis that 
shook the monarchy. 

Tomorrow, in The 
Sunday Times, Donald 
Zee chans the profound 
effect the abdication of 
King Edward VIII had on 
the lives of the young 
Duchess of York and 
Bertie, the husband she 
fought to protect 




Beat the heat tips 
to drivers as fire 


warnings go out 


BRITAIN was in undated with 
heatwave advice yesterday for 
every activity from dish-wash¬ 
ing to driving. • 

The dangers of swimming 
in hot weather were high¬ 
lighted as police frogmen 
searched for a man aged 22 
who drowned in a flooded 
opencast coalmine at West 
Hallam, Derbyshire. The 
man, from Ilkeston, Derby¬ 
shire, was believed to have 
suffered cramps. A holiday¬ 
maker died of a suspected 
heart attack at Widemouth 
Bay, Cornwall, after helping 
children in trouble in the sea. 


By Keren David . 

simil ar appeal for dishwashing long worms that invaded a 
water went put at Windsor, children’s padriHng pool hear 
where the castle gaidens have Oeethorpes turned out to be 
shrivelled. harmless larv ae. The 

The RAC issued warnings entire stock of a Liverpool 
of _ “homicidal tendencies” chocolate shop melted 
afflicting motorists trapped in There was hot competition ! 
stifling traffic jams, and gave a for the nation’s most enviable 
ten-point list of guidelines job. A frontrunner was Gulin 
including the use of old towels .Howard, who bought a ther- 


as window-shades - »nd the 
ata&e words “Be Patient”. 

Problems in store for 
motorway drivers this week- 


mal anorak yesterday to wear 
for work in the freezer room at 
Walls’ ice-cream factory in 
Gloucester. Staff at Ptffco's 


end could range from melting quality control department in 
roads to roadside fires caused Manchester, who are paid to 


Scientists Meas’ 

claim tidal . V” 
waves may 

hit Britain WHENEVER the temperature 

By Nick Nuttall rises above 90°F (32.2’C) in 

TECHNOLOGY CORRESPONDENT we reach f° r lhe 

record books to see how 
BRITAIN’S northeastern current extremes compare 
coastline is threatened by with those of the past. It is 
waves capable of devastating hard to accept that such heat is 
coastal towns and cities, three not that exceptional in south- 
scientists have claimed. Geo- ern England. What is odder is 
logical studies indicate that that we take for granted 
submarine landslips have occ- figures about it being well over 
uned in the Norwegian Sea, 100°F in the sun. We make far 
causing tidal waves to crash less fuss when we are given 
south on to the British coast, exaggerated figures about the 
submerging ancient commu- heat in sporting arenas such as 
nities and plunging large tracts Wimbledon and Lord's than 
of land under floods up to 20 we do over apparently much 
metres deep. lower shade temperatures. 

The geologists, David This confusion arises from 
Smith and Alastair Lawson, of the fact that, out in the open, 
Coventry Polytechnic, and the observed temperature de- 


Measure for measure 
in the nervous nineties 


by discarded, cigarette stubs, test electric fens, were happy 
the AA said. At Heathrow in their work. Workers at 
airport one of the mam run- Perivale Ice in west London 
ways was shut for several said people did not realise 
hoars as newly laid tarmac how hard it was to produce 20 
feiled to set tonnes of ice a day. Andrew 

Weaver fish bearing poison^ CoughJan, the manager, said; 
ous spikes lurked offthecoast “We are sold out. and our 
of west Wales, coastguards machines have overheated.” 
said. Poisonous Mne-green al- Staff, at Fortnuin and Ma- 
gae contaminated a tefce near son's store in Piccadilly, cen-■ 
Reading. There were several tral London, may feel a little 
contenders for the day’s most hot under the collar after being 
revolting story. The red inch- told that they cannot shed 

--- ■ ■ —their traditional black frock 

^ coats today. Coventry police 

Ano /vl /with were ordered to put thear ties 
vbb )ilU Wb bade on after an outbreak of 
# . open collars, and shorts were 

irkri a /1 banned for taxi drivers in 

SC I | CM lies Worcester. However, at 

W vyu Goodwood’s Richmond 

tEDiCAL correspondent enclosure strict dress regula- 

_ ‘ lions were relaxed to allow 

professor ot psychological male racegoers to remove 
medicine at City University, their jackets. 

London, said; “In conditions yhe heatwave uncovered 
like these, L would expect some strange sights; a cache of 
lethargy and fatigue to be stolen antique weapons was 
more common than aggres- found at Eton when the 
sion. There is no doubt that Thames’s level dropped by 1 
excessive _ he at c an lead to several inches and a passer-by 
physiological stress, but there saw gun bands. At Stansted 
is httie evidence of its psycho- Mountfitchet castle in Essex, a I 
logical effects in this country, life-sized waxwork knight ' 
“The police in New York melted into a puddle. j 


Ramblers were warned of airport one of the mam nm- 
the risks of starting fires in ways was shut for several 
tindetbox conditions. Fire- hours as newly laid tarmac 
men in Surrey, Hampshire feiled to set 
and Gwent fought woodland Weaver fish bearing poison- 
blazes which swept across dry' ous spikes lurked off the coast 


land.- - 

The Luton district council 


of west Wales, coastguards 
said. Poisonous filae-green al- 


appealed to people to’“share gae contaminated's take near 
yonr balh with a tree” by Reading. There were several 
throwing used water on to the contenders for the day’s most 
roots of parched plants. A revolting story. The red, inch- 


amid loosened ties 

By Thomson Prentice, medical correspondent 


FOR the first time in 23 years. 
Professor Cary Cooper wore 
shorts to his university office 
yesterday. The heatwave had 
stirred memories of bis native 
California and prompted the 
thought that leisure wear 
might be good for British 
business. 

The heat of the moment 
offered new insights into hu¬ 
man behaviour, with psycho¬ 
logists predicting symptoms 
ranging from fatigue and 


logists predicting symptoms dread the summer because Firemen called to a fire in 
ranging from fatigue and foey know it correlates with an Buckley, dwyd, were amazed 
frustration to an excess of increase in viotent ecune, but to find smoke pouring from 
friendliness. Professor Cooper th^. ^ ma ny factors which Bob Wflfiams’s electric Wan¬ 
ts bead of organisational mate a similar trend unlikely keL “I just hale getting into a 
psychology at the University this country.” cold bed and use the blanket 


of organisational 


psychology at the University 
of Manchester Institute of 
Science and Technology and a 
lading authority on stress in 
the workplace. “Hot weather 
encourages us to dress more 
informally for work, and that 
in turn may help us conduct 
our business in a more infor¬ 
mal way,” he said. 

Loosening the old school tie 
or, better still, taking it off 
could prevent executives get¬ 
ting too hot under the collar 
and make them friendlier 
towards their colleagues and 
business contacts, he said. 
“There should be positive 
results from a more relaxed 
altitude. Companies should be 
more flexible when there is a 
long hot spelL They could 
encourage people to come to 
work much earlier in the 
morning, when it’s cool, and 
leave sooner. 

“Better still, they could ten 
some of their staff to Stay - at 
home and work from there. 
It’s a lot more pleasant to 
mate your business calls from 
a deckchair in the garden than 
from behind your desk. Pro¬ 
ductivity might suffer, but in 
heat like ihis. Jt is. going to 
suffer anyway.” 

With fewer people going lo 
work, trains, buses and motor¬ 
ways would be less crowded, 
making commuting quicker 

and lea stressful, be said. The 

heat was likely to provoke 
anger, aggression and frustra¬ 
tion among drivers stuck in 
jams, but Professor Cooper 
doubted the view, expressed 
by the RAC yesterday, that it 
could trigger violence in some 
motorists. 

Pfeier Cook, the RAC’s res¬ 
cue services manager, saia: 
‘Traffic delays in stifling con¬ 
ditions can lead to homicidal 
tendencies, ft is important to 
avoid both car and driver 
boiling oyer.” 

Heatwaves provoke violent 
outbreaks.in' New York and 
Washington, but John Bonn, 



Coopen memories of his 
. native California 


keL T just hale getting into a 
I cold bed and use the blanket 
to warm the bed all year 
round,” he said. 

The heatwave was cleared 
of responsibility for stopping 
the dock of Big Ben which has 
been rcfiising to pass 5 o’clock 
for the past three days. En¬ 
gineers yesterday pinpointed 
the fault as a rogue bearing 
and worked through the day 
on the troubled eastern face of 
the clock after it had stopped 
three times in 36 hours, each 
time about 5.15. 

■Alan Franks, page 10 
In Town, page 14 
Forecast, page 22 
Inspiration, Review page 36 


David Long, of the marine 
geology unit of the British 
Geological Survey, undertook 
their research as part of the 
European Commission’s 
Climatology Programme. 
Their findings have been pub¬ 
lished in the magazine New 
Scientist. 

They bdieve that the 
unstable, natural forces that 
cause the tsunami waves are 
still active in the region, and 
that global warming and a rise 
in sea levels would make the 
arrival of tsunami waves even 
more calamitous for life, 
buildings and land. Plans for 
I nuclear power stations and 
nuclear waste sites should 
take the threat into account, : 
^ they say; i 

Scientists have long been , 
puzzled by unusual layers of i 
sand found along the northern | 
and eastern coastline of Scot¬ 
land. The British researchers 
believe that the due to their 
formation may lie in evidence 
of huge ocean bed landslips, 
called Storegga slides, at the 
southern tip of the Norwegian 
Sea, recently discovered by 
scientists at the Continental 
Institute in Trondheim, Nor¬ 
way. These landslips may 
have been triggered by earth¬ 
quakes. 

“We believe that the 
similarity in age between the 
second Storegga slide and the 
unusual sand layer of eastern 
Scotland is more than a 
coincidence. It seems likely 
that the second slide caused a 
tsunami wave that threw up 
the sand on to a wide area of 
the coast of northern Britain. 

A tsunami in the North Sea is 
not merely a historical curios¬ 
ity. It could well happen 
again,” the scientists say. 

Unstable deposits that dip 
after an earthquake and cause 
the formation of huge waves 
in the ocean are still evident 
on many areas of northwest 
Europe’s sea floor. Since 1983 
three of northwest Europe's 
strongest earthquakes have 
been within 100 kilometres of 
the Storegga area. 


pends on how efficiently the 
thermometer and its sur¬ 
roundings absorb the sun's 
rays. It is common knowledge 
that on a summer's day the 
asphalt-paved, concrete-lined 
canyons of big cities are far 
hotter than the surrounding 
countryside. This, however, 
tells us more about the locality 
than it does about the weather. 

ft is for this reason that 
meteorologists place rigorous 
standards on measuring the 
shade temperature. Ideally, it 


By Bill Burroughs 

should be taken in a well- 
ventilated specially designed 
shelter over open-mown grass. 
This is the most 3ccuraie 
measure of how extreme the 
weather is. as it effectively 
provides a figure for the lowest 
shade temperature normally 
found out in the open. 

ln England the highest pos¬ 
sible shade temperature is 
probably about ]0O"F 
(38.2’C). The perfect con¬ 
ditions for this are when the 
country is covered by a static 
anti-cyclone which wafts hot 
dry air from the CominenL 
When combined with a dry 
spell so little heat is wasted on 
evaporating surfece moisture 
that the mercury readily soars 
into the 90s in July or AugusL 
The oft-quoted 100.5° 
(38.5 a C) all-time British high, 
observed at Tunbridge Wells 
on July 22, 1868, is regarded 
with suspicion. It was re¬ 
corded in the fore-runner of 
modem instrument shelters 
and hence was more suscep¬ 
tible to some direct heating 
from the sun. It is generally 
accepted that the honest day 
for which reliable records are 
available was August 9, 1911, 
when several places recorded 


figures of 97°F (36.1’C) and 
98°F (36.6’C). 

More recently, there has 
been occasion that exceeded 
the current heatwave. Last 
year, the highest figure was 
93.6‘F (34.2 G C), and in July 
1983 there were a number of 
days in the low 90s. But pride 
of place goes to 1976, which 
had two or three days which 
came within a degree of so of 
matching the 1911 record. 

More significantly, it fea¬ 
tured 15 consecutive days 
with maxima of 90“F (32-2*C) 
or more, which exceeds by a 
factor of three any other 
heatwave on record. The feci 
that it has been hotter in the 
past is not much consolation 
for those who have to work in 
sweltering heal and can only 
grumble about the the green¬ 
house effccL 



Also. Alastair Burnet 
recounts the Queen 
Mother's love affair with 
National Hunt racing 

Earl Grey of 
Sotheby’s 

A man for all seasons or 
all markets? Tomorrow. 
The Sunday Times 
Magazine looks at the • 
irresistible rise of Grey 
Gowrie: poet, politician, 
saleroom chairman and 
wooer of the superweallhy 

Up to your neck 

Callaneticsguru Callan 
Pinckney provides a 
course of exercises to ease 
the lower back, stiff necks 
and aching shoulders 


Hidden hazards of 
cooling-off swim 


By Mark Souster 






. M' 


WITH the death rate from 
drowning doubling in the 
heatwave, the Royal Society 
for the Prevention of Ac¬ 
cidents yesterday repeated its 
warning to the public on 
swimming in potentially lethal 
inland waters in Britain. 

The society says that while 
the temptation to jump into 
the nearest water to cool off 
may be irresistible, people 
should be aware of the dan¬ 
gers. So for this year 275 
people have drowned in Great 
Britain, two-thirds in lakes, 
rivers, and reservoirs, accord¬ 
ing to the society. It advises 
people lo use one of the 3,000 
public swimming pools, where 
qualified lifeguards are on 
duty, or one of the 401 bathing 
beaches which have been des¬ 
ignated safe by the 
government 

Not one of Britain’s 7,000 
inland water areas is a des¬ 
ignated bathing area. U is 
illegal and dangerous to swim 
in reservoirs, which can be 
cold beneath the surface what¬ 
ever the air temperature, and 
technical equipment below 
the waterline poses additional 


expected. The majority of this 
year's victims have been 
young men. aged between 15 
and 30. who may have been 
eating and drinking or show¬ 
ing off to friends by diving in 
to cool off Becky Kirkwood, 
the development officer of the 
society’s water safety division 
said yesterday. 

People do not realise the 
difference between swimming 
in the controlled environment 
of a pool and aud inland 
waters, she said. Of those who 
have drowned, many have 
been good swimmers who 
have often disappeared with¬ 
out a struggle, she added. 

Mrs Kirkwood said; “Last 
year 83 people drowned dur¬ 
ing June when there was a 
similar heatwave. People 
should not swim in rivers, 
canals, quarries and res¬ 
ervoirs. The price of a good 
summer seems to be the 
pointless deaths of fiL healthy 
young people who cannot wait 
to cool off. This must be 
stopped." 

Those people who ignore 
the warnings may also face 
additional hazards from the 


problems. With water levels outbreak of potentially toxic 
low, the risk of a broken neck blue green algae which has 




High noon: office workers enjoying a splash in the 

fo untain in Trafalgar Square in London 


from diving into shallow areas 
is increased, the society says. 

Other inland waters, such as 
quarries, canals and lakes are 
equally hazardous although 
swimming in them is at one’s 
own peril. Dangers faced by 
swimmers include sudden 
cramp from cold waters, un¬ 
expectedly strong currents, 
and hidden submerged objects 
as well as water shallower than 


affected 279 inland waters so 
for this summer. 

The problem is most severe 
in the Thames, Anglia and 
Wessex regions where a gen¬ 
eral alert is in force. Algae can 
cause illnesses ranging from 
skin rashes and eye irritation 
to vomiting, diarrhoea and 
fever. 

In Town, page 14 


Staggering the great August exodus keeps hotlines open 


F OR the next three weeks the chances 
of finding the right civil servant, 
local authority official or even 
business contact at the end of a telephone 
line will be slightly less remote than is 
iKnal when Europe makes the most of the 
dog days of August and basks in the sun. 

For the first time in the 200 years since 
the industrial revolution set the working 
habits of millions, there are signs that 
more people are prepared, or even 
ordered, to work through the summer 
heal A combination of crowded roads 
and resorts, economic decline and the 
move from heavy industrial production 
to largely service-based economies has led 
some countries within the EC to encour¬ 
age a greater spread of the holiday season. 

' In Britain, this is happening almostby 
default. Last year, for example, only 22 
per cent of long holidays began in August 
compared with 26 per cent ten years 
earlier. At the same time, according to a 
survey by the English Tourist Board, the 
number of holidays taken outside the 
main four summer months rose from 17 
per cent to 22 per onL It is a trend that is 
expected to continue and the British 
Tourist Authority is pressing for further 
staggering of the season. 

Central to the situation axe school 


holidays, a problem that some countries 
have tackled. The Netherlands has been 
divided into three regions, each with 
different school holiday dates, “It has 
been a marvellous success,” said Henry 
Kol, of the Dutch embassy in London. 
“Everyone knows for the next three years 
when their schools will be on holiday and 
there is an unwritten rule among employ¬ 
ers that people with young children wfll 
get first choice of their holidays.” 

With 1.5 million children at school in 
The Netherlands this means thai a large 
proportion of the population is removed 
from the holiday peak at a stroke. The 
idea has been canvassed in Britain too, 
the main idea being to divide the school 
year into four terms. 

British education authorities can 
choose summer holiday dates. Schools in 
Scotland, for example, break upas early as 
the beginning of July, whereas those in 
southern counties have often taken 
holidays from mid-August to September. 

Other factors are playing an increasing 
role in changing the shape of the British 
summer holiday. “Until five years ago a 
three-week long holiday,was the norm, 
whereas today it is five,” the Institute of 
Directors says. “This has allowed far 
greater flexibility for people to choose to 


lake their holidays outside the main sea¬ 
son, even though our research has shown 
that only 15 percent of directors actually 
take their full holiday entitlement'' 

The gradual shut down of heavy 
industry has also led to the end of the 
traditional Wakes Weeks. The days when 
several hundred thousand Glaswegians 
for example, would board up to 50 special 
trains to take them “doon the watter", to 
resorts such as Dunoon, Rothesay and 
Millport, leaving industrial Clydeside a 
desert, are over. 

Ken Smith, acting director of the CBI 
Scotland, said that the change in Scots’ 
holiday patterns had come about because 
of social and economic change north of 
the Border. The old industrial and 
manufacturing heartland of Scotland has 
all but disappeared. As a result, the annual 
Glasgow Fair two-week holiday has gone 
too, with employees able to stagger their 
holidays throughout July and August. 

During the Glasgow Fair, industry 
would shut down for annual maintenance 
and repair. The shipyards, which in their 
prime employed about 60,000 people on 
the Clyde, lay stiff Nowadays, three-fifths 
of the population are employed in service 
industries that have no close season and 
people are urged to be as flexible as 


possible in taking their break, be it in 
Blackpool the Isle of Man or Teneriffe. 

The CBI maintains that the run down 
in heavy industry and the switch to 
service industries, such as tourism, is also 
leading to more demand for workers to 
remain at their posts throughout the per¬ 
iod. “This year, this is even more marked 
because of the economic downturn,” a 
spokesman said. “Every order is vital and 
therefore salesmen and managers are 
beavering away throughout the summer 
with no chance of easing off at aff” 

T he British Chamber of Commerce 
has also noted the trend to take 
holidays earlier or later. “More 
people seem to find working during 
August an attractive option with air-con¬ 
ditioned offices and the chance of getting 
on with papeT work without being bother¬ 
ed by constantly ringing telephones.” 

This year, the schools in West Germa¬ 
ny’s state of North Rhine Westphalia, 
where Bonn is situated, were on holiday 
for the earliest six weeks of the period and 
children have gone back this week for the 
autumn term. This means that many civil 
servants are back, able to work on 
German reunification. It also means, 
since summer heal is building up, that 


children are often sent home. If the temp¬ 
erature in the classrooms goes above 26*C 
it is considered too bot for them to work. 

Staggering of holidays can cause serious 
travel delays with families from one state 
going home at the time that others are 
leaving. Last weekend, when Baden- 
Wurttemberg “crossed over” with North 
Rhine Westphalia, motorways were 
more heavily congested than ever before. 
The worst jam, on the road from 
Nurembuxg to Berlin, was 70 miles long 
and took six hours to dear. 

Meanwhile, in France, strenuous efforts 
by government and industry to change in¬ 
grained summer holiday habits have 
succeeded in reducing the great August 
get-away. A combination of inducements 
and quotas for state employees had a 
considerable impact, while many com¬ 
panies have also streamed their holiday 
seasons to avoid what used to be more or 
less total shutdown in August 

As a result, figures show that mid-io- 
(ate July has become considerably more 
popular, although August still accounts 
for the lion’s share of holidays at around 
40 per cenL The Parisians, of course, are 
different, preferring 10 abandon their dty 
to the tourists in August 

Harvey Elliott 























4 HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Bradford discovers new wealth as unlikely tourist destination 


ng up a taskforce to come up with 
Burde 


The government is settim 

methods for easing the Burden on Britain's most popular 
tourist destinations, partly by spreading the load around 
less popular /owns and cities that will be encouraged to 
develop their potential. PETER DAVENPORT visited 
Bradford an unlikely contender that has taken the holiday 
market by surp rise. 

EVEN" the dead have their part to 
play in Bradford's tourism initia¬ 
tive. UnderclifTe Cemetery, 
sprawling over 25 acres of hillside 
on the eastern approaches to the 
city, is the final resting place of 
many a Victorian wool baron who 
made sure of lasting recognition 
by having a towering stone monu¬ 
ment erected over their grave. 

For decades the cemetery lay 
neglected, overgrown with weeds 
and with the tombstones, soaring 
Celtic crosses, obelisks and even a 
grey granite mausoleum in the 
form of an Egyptian temple, a 


regular target for vandals. Three 
years ago it was the subject of an 
environmental improvement pro¬ 
ject and now attracts thousands of 
visiters a year. It also picked up an 
award in the BBC It’s My City 
series. 

UnderclifTe Cemetery is just one 
of the attractions that were mar¬ 
keted by Bradford city council in a 
determined drive to create a 
tourist industry, almost from 
scratch, over the past 10 years. 
The range is diverse: from a 
museum dedicated to the glove 
puppet Sooty, who made his first 


public appearance in Bradford, to 
the National Museum of Photog¬ 
raphy, Film and Television, 
attracting 800,000 visitors a year, 
and the Bronte Parsonage at 
Haworth, the destination for 
200.000 tourists, including such a 
large number of Japanese that two 
members of staff at the local 
tourist information office have 
bad to learn the language. 

Just ten years alter Bradford 
entered the UK holiday market, to 
almost universal mirth, even 
among its own citizens, it has an 
industry that generates £56.4 mil¬ 
lion a year and attracts about six 
million visitors from throughout 
the UK and, increasingly, from 
abroad. At least 7,000jobs depend 
directly on tourism. 

There have been important 
other benefits too. Mike Cow lam, 
marketing manager of Bradford’s 
enterprise unit, which replaced 


the economic development unit 
that launched the tourism initia¬ 
tive, said that one of the reasons 
behind the original programme 
was to improve the appalling 
image the city then bad as a means 
of attracting new industry and 
investment. 

The council pulls no punches on 
the scale of the task. It says: *Tn 
1980 people’s idea of Bradford 
was a place where the sparrows 
woke up coughing and pigeons 
flew backwards to keep the din 
out of their eyes. Turning the 
district into a major tourist 
destination was not going to bean 
easy task. The aim was not only to 
launch Bradford's tourist trade, 
bringing new spending into the 
city, but also to boost investment 
and job creation by persuading 
investors that Bradford was the 
place to be.” The first step in the 
programme was to undertake an 


honest assessment of the attrac¬ 
tions the city and surrounding 
district had to offer, including a 
rich industrial heritage and fine 
Victorian buildings, proximity to 
the Yorkshire pales and moors 
and hotels almost empty at the 
weekends when business travellers 
had left 

It was dear from the start that 
Bradford could not compete with 
such well-established tourist cen¬ 
tres as Chester and York so it 
launched two shon-break holidays 
- In the Footsteps of the Bronte 
and Industrial Heritage. The nov¬ 
elty of Bradford entering the 
holiday market generated wide¬ 
spread publicity and in the first 
year 2,000 holidays were sold and 
the city has never looked back. 

Mr Cowlam says that Bradford 

was the first authority to set up its 
own economic development unit 
and the first industrial city to 


launch a tourism strategy as part 
of its regeneration programme. To 
keep ahead of the game, as more 
towns and dries sought to follow 
its lead, Bradford has regularly 
Introduced new attractions. 

To spread the benefits of tour¬ 
ism across the widest possible 
range of its citizens, Bradford 
launched ft Flavours of Asia 
package, explaining the origins of 
foe city’s large Asan community, 
their religious beliefs and offering 
a selection of Asian restaurants to 
be sampled. It proved the most 
successful promotion is increas¬ 
ing trade and creating new jobs. 

As the demand has grown so 
have the resources: between 1983 
and 1989 the number of holds 
increased from 12 to 31, res¬ 
taurants from 36 to 132, con¬ 
ference venues from eight to 26, 
museums and attractions from 23 
to 61, with the Victorian & Albert 


Museum set to cstabfcb a north¬ 
ern arm in the conversion ofe mill 
complex. A side-product has been 
the growth in mill shopSr from 
none in 1983to 46 last year, Wsere 
visitors can obtain bargainvsucii 
as cashmere and angora cloths, at 

■_■ , -.1-— u 


street shape. They are especially 
popular with people from Scandi¬ 
navia and foe US. • f. 

Mr Cowlam says that ft^foor- 
ism strategy and its crcatfmi-Qf a 
better image for Bradford haabeen 
•a significant contribution towards 
the city’s revived fortunes. By the 
end of last year committed: and 
planned investment stood at £i 
billion, die highest level since its 
Victorian heyday. “I am surefoerc 
are lessons to be learned bq$ for 
creating other new destination for 
tourists. Certainly nobody mbs 
any move at the idea of hp 6 days 
based in Bradford." •. 



THE World Health Organis¬ 
ation (WHO) is cutting its 
multi-million pound budget 
on Aids and is to have its 
international programme to 
fight the disease re-evaluated 
by independent experts. 

The moves are the result of 
pressure from some countries, 
including Britain, which fund 
the organisation’s Global Pro¬ 
gramme on Aids and which 
believe it has been expanded 
too rapidly since its launch 
four years ago. The health 
organisation now believes 
that up to 10 million people 
worldwide are infected with 
the Aids virus, but support for 
the Aids programme appears 
to have been damaged by 
scepticism over that estimate 
in countries where the epi¬ 
demic is growing more slowly. 

Britain, the third largest 
donor to the global pro¬ 
gramme, has limited its dona¬ 
tions through the govern¬ 
ment’s Overseas Develop¬ 
ment Administration to £4.5 
million a year since 1988. and 
the programme's budget is 
now being reduced by about 
£10 million to just under £50 
million. Many of the health 
education and Aids preven¬ 
tion projects set up in 123 
countries will be re-examined 
independently. 

Doubts have arisen about 
the priority given to some 
projects and the efficiency 
with which they have been 
established, but there is no 
suggestion of misconduct. 
Stricter management controls 
of the global programme have 
been imposed at the Geneva 
headquarters of the health 
organisation since Jonathan 
Mann, the founder and direc¬ 
tor of the programme, re¬ 
signed id March over 
disagreements on policy with 
Hiroshi Nakajima, the direc¬ 
tor general. 

Dr Mann launched the pro¬ 
gramme in a small office four 


By Thomson Prentice, medical correspondent 

for some of their support to 
other United Nations agencies 
that are becoming more in¬ 
volved in Aids work, and to 
fond more non-governmental 
organisations. The changes are 
being watched closely by Aids 
workers in Britain. Martin 


years ago. It now has a staff of 
almost 200 and the biggest 
budget of any health organis¬ 
ation project Dr Mann 
visited most of the 150 coun¬ 
tries affected by the disease 
and encouraged them to set up 
schemes to screen blood, im¬ 


prove health care and start sex 
education campaigns. Latterly 
he complained that Dr 
Nakajima had blocked many 
of his initiatives and down¬ 
graded the importance of 
Aids prevention. 

“Dr Mann was an excellent 
ambassador for the pro¬ 
gramme, but he wasn't a good 
manager.** Hans Moerkerk, a 
member of the management 
committee for the global pro¬ 
gramme, said yesterday. “The 
programme has done wonder¬ 
ful work, but it is now time to 
stabilise it and make sure that 
the quality of the work re¬ 
mains hig h.” 

Karl Olaf Watthne, Nor¬ 
way’s representative on the 
committee, said: “It has taken 
too long to establish an eff¬ 
icient programme. In some 
developing countries there are 
problems in getting resources 
out of the capital and into the 
regions where help is most 
needed. The epidemic is so 
serious that we cannot afford 
quarrels or inefficiency." 

Dr Mann had hoped, before 
he resigned, that the Aids 
project would be allocated a 
budget of £59.4 million this 
year. Instead it will be £49 
million, and most donor 
countries are reluctant to 
pledge more than a 5 per cent 
increase for next year. 

Dr Moerkerk said the donor 
countries were arranging an 
external evaluation of the 
programme that would start in 
September and take six 
months. The evaluators will 
report to the management 
committee of the global pro¬ 
gramme next March. 

The doners intend to trans- 


Foreman, of the Panos In¬ 
stitute in London, an indepen¬ 
dent health promotion organ¬ 
isation, said: “We hope 
WHO’s priorities on Aids 
remain unchanged, but some 
of the energy appears to have 
gone. The global epidemic is 
still at an early stage and this is 
not the time to downgrade 
international commitment to 
it." 

• Sixty-five hospitals and 
health units have applied to 
become health service trusts, 
Kenneth Clarke announced 
yesterday. 

The health secretary said a 
three-month public consulta¬ 
tion exercise will now begi n on 
the first wave of applications. 
However, he re-emphasised 
that he will take the final 
decision on whether or not a 
hospital or unit achieves trust 
status, giving it more control 
over its financial affairs. 

Applicants include the Roy¬ 
al National Throat, Nose and 
Ear Hospital, central London. 
Leeds General Infirmary and 
associated hospitals, the Ro¬ 
yal Free Hospital, north 
London, and the Royal 
Liverpool Children's Hospi¬ 
tal. Mr Clarke said that al¬ 
though trusts will have greater 
responsibility for’ running 
their own affairs they will 
remain within the National 
Health Service. 


Infection 
lays low 
listeriosis 
claim boy 

A HANDICAPPED boy at the 
centre of a £1 million listeri¬ 
osis compensation battle with 
the government was ill in 
hospital last night. 

Joshua Devereux, 20 
months old next week, was 
taken to Wrexham Maelor 
hospital in Clwyd, north 
Wales, suffering from an 
infection. His father, Bill Dev¬ 
ereux, and mother, Vivien, of 
Wilderness Farm, Gresford, 
near Wrexham, were at his 
bedside. 

Solicitors acting for Joshua 
started proceedings against 
the government last month, 
claiming negligence because it 
knew about the dangers of 
listeria but had allegedly de¬ 
layed issuing a public lualth 
warning. Joshua was born 
with cerebral palsy and hydro¬ 
cephalus after contracting 
listeriosis in the womb. He 
was one month old when a 
health warning was issued 
The blind and brain-dam- 
aged boy was found on Thurs¬ 
day morning lying apparently 
lifeless on a blood-stained 
pillow. “My wife called me 
and we detected some shallow 
breathing. We brought him 
straight into hospital. He is 
poorly, but be is an incredible 
fighter," Mr Devereux said 
“The doctors think it is a 
massive infection of some 
sort, which may be related to 
the bowel or, more probably, 
chest problems he has had” 
The couple’s daughter-in- 
law, Suzanne Devereux. who 
is looking after Joshua for 12 
hours a week, said that he was 
still seriously ill and was very 
slow. 

Joshua has been receiving 
blood and plasma transfu¬ 
sions. Wrexham Maelor hos¬ 
pital described Joshua’s 
condition as stable. 


MCHAB. POWEUL 



■' Children 
among six 
killed In 
car crash 

Six people, including' four 
members of one family, died 
when two cars crashedon the 
A85 between Perth and Crieffi 
Tayside, on Thursday night 
Police said the accident was _ 
ore of foe worst m the region. * 
The dead family was named! 
by Tayside police as Raymond 
Brown, a panel beater aged 29, 
his wife Fiona; aged 27, and 
their sons, Ross, aged four, 
and Stuart, aged two. Martin 
Dollery, a motor engineer 
aged 29, also died in tbe crash. 

His wife Joy, the only survivor 
of the collision, was. in a 
satisfactory condition m Perth 
Royal Infirmary yesterday. 

The six were all travelling in a 
Vauxhall Cavalier. 

The sixth person killed was 
the driver ofa Ford Capri who 
was trapped in his car, which 
caught fire. Police woedd ne* 
identify him until relatives 
had been informed. AH the 
victims are believed’ to be 4 
local people. 

Tree not spared 

Islington borough council has . 
failed to get a court hearing for 
its application for a stayofex- 
ecution on a 150-year-old 
chestnut tree in St t Paul's 
Shrubbery, Cano nbury. n orth 
London. Protesters crying to 
save the tree have been,camp¬ 
ing in its branches. T$e tree 
may be cut down on Tuesday. 

Death case % 

-Kharixn Ghahni, of Wheatley, 
Oxfordshire, said to have been 
the front seat passenger in a 
car involved in a read ac- 
cident iu which a pedestrian r 
died, was. remanded -in- cus¬ 
tody by Thame magistrates 
accused of mansfanghter. 

Appeal to prince 

.Protesters have written to the 
Prince of Wales asking him to 
stop Testfo from buikting a 
superstore on parkland at 
Golden Hill, Bristol, Avon. 

Accident verdict 

A verdict of acridental death 
was returned yesterday on 
Chris Peace, of Llantideyrn, 
Cardiff/ Sooth Glamorgan, 
who died after being hit by a 
speeding police car as he 
walked, home, on New Year’s 
Day. His family is to cktim 
againstthe police. 

£2m to survivor * 

A property developer, Nor¬ 
man Ltiley, his wife Susan and 
their son Mark, aged 21, of 
Amplefonh, Yorkshire, who 
were killed in a flying accident 
in France at Easter ^ left 
£2^04,909 net before tax to a 
daughter, Sarah, aged 20 . 


Crucifix, a sculpture by Anthony Heywood, made from assorted junk including 
toys, shells and even a television set, is hung outside St Thomas's church at 
Canterbury, Kent. The sculpture was inspired by the plight of the homeless 


Student architects 
profit from prince 

By Charles Knevitt. architecture correspondent 


STUDENTS from nine coun¬ 
tries, including Czechoslo¬ 
vakia and East Germany, will 
learn to practise what the 
Prince of Wales preaches on 
architecture when they start a 
course at Magdalen College. 
Oxford, today. 

The Prince of Wales’s sum¬ 
mer school in civil architec¬ 
ture will be formally opened 
by the prince, its founder, 
tomorrow. The 24 students 
will take classes in drawing 
and sketching, ornament, 
lettering, carving, and public 
consultation on design, and 
visit a stonemason's yard. 

Practical work will include a 
project to design an infill 
building in an historic setting, 
and motorway design. Teach¬ 
ers will include architects, 
engineers, planners, graphic 
designers, builders, painters, 
craftsmen and historians. 

The students, men and 
women aged between 20 and 
40, were selected from 203 
applicants. They come from 
New Zealand, Canada, Italy. 
Greece, the United States and 
the UK- Two thirds have 
scholarships to help with the 
£ 1,000 costs. 

Later this month the school 
will transfer to the British 
School at Rome, 2 nd then 
move about 50 miles north to 
the Villa Lame, near Viterbo, 
which has been made avail¬ 
able by the Italian govern¬ 
ment. The school is intended 
to be held annually and has 
been organised without inv¬ 
olving the Royal Institute of 
British Architects, which rec¬ 
ognises 36 schools of architec¬ 
ture in this country. 

The prince, in his book A 
Vision cf Britain , published 
last autumn, said that 
architectural education need¬ 
ed to be radically overhauled. 
Jules Lubbock, director of 
studies, said: “The prince 
wants the summer school to 
encourage a reverence for our 
natural surroundings, result¬ 
ing in buildings which contrib¬ 


ute to foe well-being of those 
who use them, and which 
display respect — or show 
‘good manners' — toward the 
buildings and landscapes 
among which they take their 
place. 

“The prince spent two years 
exploring the questions of 
architectural education in 
Britain and found that many 
people who share his enthu¬ 
siasm are doing something to 
meet the need for architectural 
education based on these prin¬ 
ciples. which is how the idea of 
the summer school came 
about.” 

Leading article, page 11 


Parnes was terrified over 
cover-up threat, QC says 


ANTHONY Parnes, the 
stockbroker, was left terrified 
of foe punishment that could 
be handed out by a rich and 
powerful businessman after a 
Whitehall investigation was 
launched into foe Guinness 
deal, it was claimed yesterday. 

Ephraim Margulies. foe for¬ 
mer chairman of foe sugar and 
foods group S and W 
Berisford, threatened to alter 
documents to show that Mr 
Parnes received £1.94 million 
of the success fee unless foe 
broker agreed to an elaborate 
cover-up, Colin Nicholls, QC, 
for Mr Pames, told Southwark 
Crown Court, south London. 

Later Mr Paines was sob¬ 
bing with genuine fear as he 
explained his role to govern¬ 
ment officers. The money was 
pan of foe £3.4 million paid to 
Berisford companies as a suc¬ 
cess fee and to cover losses 
after investing £15 million in 
an alleged illegal share support 
scheme that saw Guinness win 
its bid for Distillers in early 


19S6. The £1.9 million was 
invoiced through one of Mr 
Margulies* offshore com¬ 
panies, Cifco, but Mr Parnes 
was told that it would look like 
he received foe payoff unless 
he agreed 10 a cover-up. Trade 
department inspectors were 
appointed to investigate foe 
bid in December 1986. Mr 
Margulies made his threat on 
December 10. 

Mr Pames, aged 45, Ernest 
Saunders, aged 55, former 
chairman of Guinness, Gerald 
Ronson, aged 50, head of 
Heron International, and Sir 
Jack Lyons, aged 74, a finan¬ 
cier. deny 24 counts including 
theft, false accounting and 
breaches of the Companies 
ACL 

Mr Nicholls told foe jury: 
“Tony Pames was out of foe 
frying pan and into the fire.” 
He said that Olivier Roux, Mr 
Pames’ friend and former 
Guinness finance director, 
who was given immunity 
from prosecution to give evi¬ 


dence for foe Crown, agreed 
with Mr Margulies that back¬ 
dated invoices could be used 
to show that Cifco undertook 
market research abroad to 
justify the payment, to protect 
the broker. 

“From December 10, Mr 
Pames had foe terrifying pros¬ 
pect of either going along with 
a conspiracy to pervert the 
course of justice or ending up 
who knows where as a punish¬ 
ment for crossing a rich and 
powerful businessman like 
Ephraim Margulies." Mr 
Nicholls said foe inspectors 
believed Mr Pames was genu¬ 
inely frightened. 

Mr Nicholls appealed to 
the jury not to compare foe 
£3.35 million fee paid to Mr 
Pames to the sort of salaries 
they or their friends may earn. 
The payment was justified in 
terms of the size of the bid and 
Mr Parnes* undercover intelli¬ 
gence of foe stock market. 

The trial continues on 
Monday. 


Parents want better 
service for children 


By Robin Young 

BRITISH parents want their 
children to get better service in 
hotels and restaurants, accord¬ 
ing to a survey published 
today. The advertising agency 
WSF Dialogue, which com¬ 
missioned the survey, cl aim s 
that the number of “more 
sophisticated, well-off par¬ 
ents ", SWOPS in the agency’s 
jargon, who want to eat out 
with their children is growing. 

Alas tair Waldron, manag¬ 
ing director of the agency, said 
yesterday that too often the 
only option offered was a med 
of a burger and chips and a 
staff attitude that all children 
should be treated as if they 
were five years old or less. 

“The promise of UK 
establishments which specia¬ 
lise in catering to families is 
not reflected in their practice. 

It is no good if foe whole thing 
is just a marketing exercise 
and let down by poorly trained 
staff. Children should be 
treated as customers in their 


own right,” he said. Foreign 
travel had fed families to 
expect more. “In France, 
children are seen as an 
opportunity, not a problem.” ] 

Children should be able to 
choose between hamburgers 


English food, and 
children's portions from foe 
adult menu would introduce 
more adventurous and heal¬ 
thy food, foe survey says. Staff 
should be friendly and helpful 
to children, partring easier, 
parents should know in ad¬ 
vance bow modi a meal will 
cost them, and high chairs 
should be providedlf needed, 
foe survey says. 


Although weekend breaks 
are becoming ever more popu¬ 
lar in the UK holiday market, 
families complained that it 
was difficult to identify hotels 
where children would be wel¬ 
come, and to get an accurate 
idea of the tikdy cost of a 
family weekend. 


Murder charge 

Kevin Roy Jerreit, a labourer 
aged 20 , appeared before mag¬ 
istrates in Plymouth, Devon, 
charged with the murder ofa 
boy aged 14 months. He was 
re m a n ded in custody. . 



up arguments over a new ‘traditional’ village 

- 1 By John Young . 


CHRIS Patten, foe environ¬ 
ment secretary, is expected to 
decide within foe next few 
days whether to allow a village 
10 be built in open countryside 
near Newbury, in Berkshire. 

The project has attracted 
wide interest partly because 
foe owner of foe land. James 
Gladstone, has commissioned 
foe “classical” architect John 
Simpson to design the village 
in traditional style (left). Mr 
Simpson's plans for the 
redevelopment of Paternoster 
Square, close to. St Paul’s 
Cathedral, have won foe sup¬ 
port of the Prince of Wales. 

There is, however, foe ques¬ 
tion of whether Mr Patten is 
prepared to override foe Berk¬ 
shire county structure plan 
which, like all other similar 
plans in England and Wales 
with foe exception of Cam¬ 
bridgeshire, insists that all 
new- development should be 
within or on foe outskirts of 
existing towns and villages. 

The plans for foe village of 
Upper Donnington were re¬ 
jected by Newbury district 
council last year. They were 


subsequently presented at a 
two-week public enquiry in 
October, at which they were 
opposed by the Council for foe 
Protection of Rural England. 
Since then a local pressure 
group. Sane Planning in foe 
South East, has urged Berk¬ 
shire MPs to bring pressure on 
Mr Patten to turn down the 
scheme. 

The pressure group was 
formed four years ago to 
oppose foe construction of a 
new town at Foxky Wood, 
near Camberley, Surrey, 
which Nicholas Ridley, then 
environment secretary, said 
be was minded to approve, 
but wh ich Mr Patten injected. 

Christina Hill, co-ordinator 
of foe pressure group, regards 
Upper Donnington as a key 
test for Mr Patten, whom she 
suspects of “reconsidering his 
stance on unwelcome new 
towns”. 

Dr Hill says that it would 
create a dangerous precedent 
to undermine the county 
structure plan and that foe 
village would occupy a Civil 
War battle site in a designated 


area of outstanding natural 
beauty. 

However, Mr Gladsto ne; a 
farmer and journalist, insist s 
that his development would 
not be a new town. Only 25 of 
the 82 acres would be built on 
and foe village would lie in a 
hollow, screened by trees, and 

include woodland. 

Mr Simpson’s scheme envi¬ 
sages the construction of 
about 300 .houses and flat* 
des«ned to resemble a pic¬ 
turesque English village. 
There would be shops/a 
“^ricet square, a village halL a 
public, house andTXf 
operwm; amphitheatre. There 
would also be an information 

centre for visitors to Donninfr 

ton Castle, an ancient mon£ 
ment lmgely destroyed in the 
KAvii war. 

Under foe government's 
«t-aside scheme, the land * 
no longer used for grow™ 

Gladstone 

would be happy to manage his 
remaining 400 acresonTno^ 

*¥“*■ lowing some 
of foe land to be used as a 
nature reserve with public 


footpaths and bridleways 
15 , in any case, due : to 
bisected, for foe planned j 
bypass. 

.He makes no secret of 
met that the proposed vih 
would help to pay fin- 
restoration and upkeep of 
home. Donnington Grovt 
teted Grade II* and 
Gladstone, has undertaken 
spend ai least £250,000 on 
house if foe project is 
proved. Rather--than sell 

SlJLS 8 he : 

secured an undertaking, ffc 
sn. fosurence- company to 

years ago I w© 
never have dreamt of mafc 
iS“fPPlfeation”Sffl 

But two things have chaa® 

°«.landb^ 
for agriculture a 
morc ~ The other is that 
generation 
^J°dardutect5 in whom if 
confidence and-who can bu 
iivt^ Where People want 


* 


.-r-Jt; 

Vi? 

5 


Page 11 











atfo 


•* ».* 

r-> . 

i?..*. •*.!•,*;»«'■ 

•*••■*:■» v. ■i'.- 

'y i * 4 p 




. "it i: l-'v* 


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+*? , *' -'• .r~. ’• 

2T ' 


Ire *„ * ‘^O^- 


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* ^ ’f. « 

■Jr--..- ... ,, 

r-.:. :*• -■ , 

• '"t-'-,-.. ;• -r. 


■ _ -V-. ■•■. 


Chi| dftt 

™!>m 


ki| iedi, 

; ar crasj 


’i. 



wrote ‘The 


Also Rises* 


writi^j^ia iijsi owjt 


experience. - . 

When Conrad wrote' 


about a journey into the ‘Hear 
of Darkness’ he’d already been the 


the ‘Bill’ team pitting their 
wits against slick, inter¬ 
im national jewel-thieves 
' or deadly mafiosi. 

■ tBv Generally, they 


dedicated ‘Bill’ watchers. 


And from our own point of view. 


it has helped us to depict difficult and 


And when our writers sit down 


pit their wits 
against 


delicate issues in what we hope is a 


more sensitive and informed manner. 


to write for ‘The Bill’, they too are 
writing from experience. 

Not. that we’re claiming our 
writers are on the same literary 
plane as Conrad or Hemingway. 

It’s just that we believe there’s 
no substitute for experiencing the 
real thing - if, that is, you want to 
depict the real thing. v 

Which is why before any of our 
writers put pen to paper to write 
about- fictional police, we expect 
them to put in a lot of time observ¬ 
ing and talking to real ones. 

When we started the pro- 
gramme in 1984, we fejt stronglyjr 
that there were too mapy glam- M . 
orised cop shows on..TV 
There still are., 

But ‘The Bill’ is not one of them. 

It’s about police-work. Not about 


everv- 


Above all, regular viewing figures 


life 


day 


of around eleven million confirm 


on the 


to us that drama can be authentic 


streets witlf 


all its trials 


and tribulations. 




without having to lose any of its 


entertainment value. 


TJo make sure they 
do so strictly accord 
ing to police procedure, , 
every scene and every line of 


i 




All it takes is a brilliant cast of 


actors and actresses. 




A fearless, dedicated 


production team. 


dialogue is scrutinised by two 


police advisors: one ex-uniform, the 


And a lot of hard¬ 


hitting writing. 


other, ex-CID. Of course, none of this 


‘TV-verite’ would be of any 


consequence if 


the sets 5 


locations 


were less thJfecon^wil 

■Vhs&.. - ^ 

Which is why wC%ult 


vincing. 


T&ks. 


our very own fully operaM®^ 
police station, Sun Hill. 




ES. A TALENT FOR TELEVISION. 


1 wou’jc 

ii the sh 
active p 
the 

at untjJ 
:s little: 




























6_OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


The invasion of Kuwait: world response 




Iran cleric 
softens line 
on relations 
with London 

By Andrew McEwen. diplomatic editor 


THE deterioration in Britain's 
relations with Iraq as a result 
of the invasion of Kuwait 
appeared yesterday to have 
softened the altitude of Iran's 
clerical establishment towards 
London. 

Britain has come close to 
meeting Iran's conditions for 
the restoration of diplomatic 
relations by condemning Sal¬ 
man Rushdie and showing 
res pea for Islam, an Iranian 
religious leader said yesterday 

Ayatollah Mohammad Em- 
ani Kashani referred in a 
prayer sermon to a letter 
written to an MP by Douglas 
Hurd, the foreign secretary, in 
which he praised Islam as 
“one of the world's greatest 
religions’', and said that the 


Dangers 
for Israel 
brought 
into focus 

From Our Correspondent 

IN JERUSALEM 

THE invasion of Kuwait is a 
mixed blessing for Israel. It 
has deflected attention from 
the intifada, taking the pres¬ 
sure off Israel to compromise 
on the Palestinian problem, 
but has brought into sharp 
focus the threat Iraq poses to 
Israel's security- Since April, 
President Saddam Hussein 
has been threatening to use 
chemical weapons against the 
Jewish state. 

Israeli officials have so far 
said that they did not expect to 
become militarily involved in 
the conflicL “There will be an 
Israeli response only if Iraq 
takes aggressive action against 
Israel." said Moshe Arens, the 
defence minister. But they 
also warned of a “red line" 
that would trigger an immedi 
ate response. This would be 
the entry of Iraqi troops into 
Jordan, which borders Israel 
“The movement of Iraqi 
forces into Jordan would 
represent a real and immedi¬ 
ate threat to Israel,” Moshe 
Levy, the foreign minister, 
told Israel Radio yesterday. 

Yossi Olmert, head of the 
Israeli government press of¬ 
fice, said Israel should take 
President Saddam seriously. 
“He has the habit of issuing 
threats ail over the place," Mr 
Olmert said. “Once he has 
made good on one, you can't 
ignore the others." 

Palestinians and liberal 
Israelis are concerned that the 
Kuwait invasion will destroy 
any hope the Palestinians had 
of making gains from their 31- 
month uprising against the 
Israeli occupation of the West 
Bank and Gaza strip. 

The Palestinian issue is 
expected to be the centre of 
discussions that Mr Levy is to 
have in Washington on Au¬ 
gust 9. Instead, Iraq’s action 
has given Israel an opportu¬ 
nity to press home the mess¬ 
age that the United States 
needs Israel as a strategic ally. 

Last month Mr Arens went 
to Washington for private 
talks with Richard Cheney, 
the US defence secretary. His 
main mission was to try to get 
US guarantees of continued 
financial aid. There were 
reports in Israeli newspapers 
yesterday dial Mr Arens may 
have warned Mr Cheney of 
possible I raqi aggression in die 
Gulf during this visit. 

To underscore Israel’s pot¬ 
ential usefulness to the Ameri¬ 
cans, there were reports from 
unidentified intelligence of¬ 
ficials suggesting that Israel 
was giving all its intelligence 
information on the Iraq-Ku¬ 
wait conflict to America. One 
intelligence source said Is¬ 
rael’s intelligence community 
had turned Iraq's invasion on 
Thursday “into a full-scale 
exercise" in which they mon¬ 
itored military communi¬ 
cations, intercepted and 
decoded telephone conversa¬ 
tions and tried to anticipate 
Iraqi troop movements. 


Abba Ehan, page 10 



Moshe Levy: “watching 

with preparedness” 


government understood that 
Rushdie's novel. The Satanic 
Verses, had deeply offended 
many people. 

Ayatollah Kashani inter¬ 
preted this as condemnation 
of Rushdie. There is little 
doubt that it was intentionally 
worded by the foreign sec¬ 
retary so that it could be 
construed that way. Condem¬ 
nation of Rushdie or the book 
has been a key demand of the 
Iranian parliament, the 
Majlis. “By condemning Sal¬ 
man Rushdie and respecting 
beliefs of the Muslims, Britain 
has almost met the conditions 
set by (the) Majlis,” the Iran¬ 
ian news agency Irna quoted 
him as saying. 

“Hurd for the first time in a 
dear stance of the British 
government condemned Sal¬ 
man Rushdie and expressed, 
respect for Muslims in defend¬ 
ing their beliefs”. 

Ayatollah Kashani is a 
member of the Guardian 
Council which oversees the 
Iranian parliament, without 
whose authority the govern¬ 
ment cannot restore relations. 

Mr Hurd's remarks were 
also the subject of another 
Irna article quoted by Iran 
radio and monitored by the 
BBC. It said that Mr Hurd was 
“adopting a new policy” in 
conceding that Muslims were 
entitled to regard as obscene, 
writings that insult their 
beliefs. 

The Iranian government is 
likely to wait to see how 
Ayatollah Kashani’s opinion 
is received before givipg its 
own view. In the past state¬ 
ments seen as favourable to 
Britain have often prompted 
criticism from hardliners op¬ 
posed to any rapprochement. 

Ali Akbar Velayati. the 
foreign minister, said last 
month that Britain had taken 
some positive steps but the 
fatwa against Rushdie re¬ 
mained m force and Iran's 
conditions for restoring links 
were unchanged. 

A renewal of Angio-Iranian 
ties could lead to the release of 
British hostages held in 
Beirut. 

Islamic Jihad has suggested 
in the past that Western 



Senate 
votes for 
stealth 



Customers queue yesterday outside the National Bank of Kuwait in London. Urey can draw a maxim am daily amount of £500 to £1,000 


Death 
knell for 
ties with 
France 

From Philip Jacobson 
IN PARIS 


hostages should be exchanged 
for 15 Iraqi, Lebanese and 
Kuwaiti Shia Muslim pris¬ 
oners held in Kuwait for 
terrorist offences. 

The invasion of Kuwait has 
put Baghdad in a position to 
decide what should happen to 
them. Iraq is not likely to free 
them because they admitted at 
their trial that they were 
members of al-Dawa. an Iran¬ 
ian-backed dissident move¬ 
ment in Iraq. Some diplomats 
fear that Iraq might execute 
them. 

This would probably nei¬ 
ther help nor harm the West¬ 
ern hostages. Their captors 
hoped die West could per¬ 
suade the emir of Kuwait to 
free them, but realise that 
Western countries have no 
influence on President 
Saddam Hussein. 

• Rnstie pledge: The Arch¬ 
bishop of Canterbury pledged 
yesterday not to relent or relax 
bis vigilance in attempting to 
free his kidnapped envoy 
Teny Waite (Ruth Gledhill 
writes). 

He said that, although he 
would retire next January, “I 
shall work away at it with my 
staff by every means possible, 
and if necessary after retire¬ 
ment” Speaking at the close 
of the meeting of the Anglican 
Consultative Council, at St 
Nicholas, near Cardiff, Dr 
RobertRuncie called for ur¬ 
gent action to secure peace 
after the invasion of Kuwait 

“There is an urgent need for 
the international community 
to act, and they appear to be 
acting together, in order to 
bring about a peaceful and just 
settlement for the stability of 
the Gulf. 


ON THE day of the invasion. 
French government officials 
were preparing to sign an 
initial accord with Iraq on a 
new formula for handling 
Baghdad's $4 billion (£2.16 
billion) debt Virtually all of 
this represents massive arms 
purchases (as much as $5 
billion) by the regime of 
President Saddam Hussein 
during the Gulf war. 

Then, sophisticated weap¬ 
onry poured in from France: 
the Mirage2000 fighter jet and 
the advanced Super Elenards, 
light and heavy tanks, artillery 
systems and the Exocet mis¬ 
siles that were used to knock 
out Iranian oil complexes at 
Kharg island and elsewhere. 

As Roland Dumas, the 
French foreign minister, ac¬ 
knowledged earlier this week, 
getting the money out of Iraq 
had proved “extremely diffi¬ 
cult". As a result, efforts to 
reschedule Baghdad's debts 
had begun and an initial 
agreement had been reached. 
Pending a full settlement 
France has suspended further 
arms deliveries to Iraq. 

French officials privately 
acknowledge that previous 
close links between Paris and 
Baghdad have greatly com¬ 
plicated the present situation. 
In the wake of the 1973 
Middle East war, France had 
eagerly courted Iraq, with the 
then conservative prime min¬ 
ister, Jacques Chirac, visiting 
Baghdad to clinch an oil-for- 
nuclear-expertise deal 
In return for Iraqi crude, 
which last year accounted for 
almost a tenth of French oil 
imports, Paris had agreed to 
help develop the country’s 
first nuclear reactor at Tam- 
mouz for “peaceful purposes”. 
Not long after the reactor was 
destroyed by the Israeli air 
force in a daring raid in June 
1981, the Socialists came to 
power in France and, in the 
words of M Dumas, “had 
continued to honour existing 
agreements". 

In a recent interview. Resi¬ 
dent Saddam confirmed that 
France had indeed stood by its 
“military engagements” with 
Iraq, but complained of foot- 
dragging in Paris about en¬ 
couraging the Iraqis to deve¬ 
lop their own weapons indust¬ 
ry. Foreign observers said that 
at last year's Baghdad military 
'fair, displays of Iraqi equip¬ 
ment included a Mirage modi¬ 
fied to fire Soviet missiles and 
a Soviet electronic surveil¬ 
lance aircraft fitted with 
French radar systems. 


According to M Dumas, the 
Referring to the hostages, he: present crisis is certain to 
said: “Any outbreak of vi- affect French policy towards 
olence of that kind is bound to Iraq. It seems that the old love 
be worrying, but at the mo- affair, with all its attendant 
ment it is impossible to be diplomatic delicacies, is now 
more specific than that." over. 


Tough stand on assets spreads 


JAPAN. West Germany and 
other Western nations yes¬ 
terday joined the move to 
prevent Iraq from getting bold 
of Kuwait's vast foreign 
investments, adding strength 
to steps taken by the United 
States, Britain and France. 

Japan's government has in¬ 
structed banks and other 
financial institutions to pre¬ 
vent Iraq from acquiring Ku¬ 
waiti assets held in Japan and 
is considering further steps in 
protest against the Iraqi inva¬ 
sion, the Foreign Ministry 
said yesterday. 

Its spokesman. Taizo 
Watanabe, said the govern¬ 
ment issued the instructions, 
called “administrative guid¬ 
ance," in response to a request 
from the Kuwaiti ambassador. 
He said Japan would consider 
taking further actions after 
deliberations fry the United 
Nations Security Council last 
night The government does 
not have the legal authority to 
freeze Kuwaiti assets in Japan, 
which total about $20 billion 
(£10.8 billion). But banks 
probably will follow the gov¬ 
ernment's instructions to en¬ 
sure that only the rightful 
owners of Kuwaiti assets be 
allowed access to them. 

The Japanese government 
commonly issues instructions 
in the form of administrative 


to 


. By Our Foreign Staff 
business and 


guidance 
industry. 

The chief cabinet secretary, 
Misoji Sakamoto, told.report¬ 
ers yesterday that Japan would 
deal with the situation “from 
the same standpoint as other 
Western countries.” 

West Germany announced 
yesterday that it was freezing 
all Kuwaiti assets in the 
country to prevent them being 
seized by Iraq. It also sus¬ 
pended all export credits for 
Iraq and blocked all export 
permits there. 

New, tougher guidelines for 
exports to Iraq of both mili¬ 
tary and civilian equipment 
have also been issued and 
careful controls established on 
all shipments to any destina¬ 
tion of weapons and nuclear 
materiaL 

Kuwait invests extensively 
in West Germany and has a 14 
per cent bolding in Daimler- 
Benz, which is the largest 
company in the country, as 
well as a 20 per cent slake in 
both the chemical giant, 
Hoechst, and the mining and 
engineering group, 
MetaJlgese Use haft. 

Since the end of the Gulf 
War, West German exporters 
have worked hard to develop 
the market in Iraq, selling 
DM2 billion (£700 million) 
worth of goods last year, a 41 


per cent increase over 1988. 
Because of this carefully nur¬ 
tured market. West Germany 
was slower than some other 
countries , including Britain, 
to respond 

Italy’s government yes¬ 
terday froze Kuwaiti assets 
held in Italy and suspended 
arms exports to Iraq. The 
measures were taken daring a 
Cabinet meeting to discuss the 
Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. 

The foreign minister, 
Gianni De Mzcbelis, said the 
Cabinet approved a decree 
freezing Kuwaiti assets with 
immediate effect as a “precau¬ 
tionary” measure. The action 
was aimed at denying Iraq 
financial benefits from its 
invasion. Kuwait's state oil 
company, Kuwait Petroleum 
Corporation, is the second- 
largest distributor of petro¬ 
leum products to the Italian 
market and controls nearly 11 
per cent of the domestic 
market after its acquisition of 
Mobil Italians SPA in March. 

Nino Crislofori, an under 
secretary, announced that the 
cabinet derided to suspend 
immediately all arms exports 
to Iraq. He said a formal 
decree may be drawn up later 
to conform with any decision 
taken by the EC 

Italy, which holds the rotat¬ 
ing presidency of the EC, has 


scheduled a meeting of foreign 
minis try officials of the 12 
member states in Rome today 
to discuss the crisis. Signor De 
Michelis told reporters that 
Italy would try to get the 12 to 
approve “concrete measures” 
to put the “maximum possible 
pressure” on Iraq to achieve 
an “immediate and uncondi¬ 
tional” Iraqi withdrawal 

Belgium said it would freeze 
Kuwaiti assets. 

Switzerland stopped short 
of a freeze and asked its banks 
to vet carefully any withdraw¬ 
als of Kuwaiti funds. 

The Netherlands govern¬ 
ment froze export credits to 
both Iraq and.Kuwait and said 

it Was hamti 

tankers carrying Iraqi crude 
oil from entering the post of 
Rotterdam. 

Norway froze Kuwait's tiny 
assets in the country yesterday 
to prevent them Iran Ming 
into Baghdad's hands and said 
it would back a wider inter¬ 
national blockade of Iraq. 

The Norwegian Ship¬ 
owners' Association, which 
estimates that about 15 per 
cent of Kuwait's oil is ex¬ 
ported in Norwegian tankers, 
said it opposed a unilateral 
trade embargo. 

Leading article, page H 


Divided sympathies in London 


By Our Foreign Staff 

THERE was little hint of the 
fighting in the Gulf as a 
polyglot assortment of the 
worid's Muslims gathered yes¬ 
terday for Friday prayers at 
London's central mosque in 
Regent's Park. No special 
prayers were said, and the 
poster on the mosque’s door 
pleaded the case not of the 
embattled Emir but of 


Mordechai Vanunu, the tech¬ 
nician famous for leaking 
Israeli nuclear secrets. 

Outside, those willing to 
talk to reporters generally had 
surprisingly few words of sym¬ 
pathy for the invasion's vic¬ 
tims. “The Kuwaitis are 
corrupt people. Hussein saved 
them from Iran," said an 
Egyptian. A Sudanese student 
added: “Kuwait is not honest 
They have billions of dollars 


in the banks of the US, 
Switzerland and western 
countries.” 

Kuwait had undermined 
the international price of oil 
and then refused to listen to 
Baghdad's entreaties, he 
added. “Five times — or a 
hundred times — they blocked 
their ears.” 

Among those who con¬ 
demned the Iraqi invasion, 
many also criticised the West 

JOHN CHAPMAN 



Ghazi ai-Rayes. Kuwait's ambassador, addressing demonstrators outside the 
country's embassy in Queen’s Gate, London, before Friday prayers 


for its inaction — or expressed 
fears h might do too much. “A 
peace-loving country has been 
attacked by a brutal man. That 
is terrible,” said an Indian 
Muslim. “But the world re¬ 
sponse has been very bad. If it 
had been some other place 
they would have acted faster ” 

Meanwhile, in Switzerland 
yesterday, the building hous¬ 
ing the offices of Iraqi Airways 
in Geneva caught foe, but the 
airline office was not dam¬ 
aged. Police said it was not 
immediately dear if the fire 
had been started deliberately 
or if it was an accident. 1 

The Kuwaiti ambassador to 
the United Nations in Ge¬ 
neva, a son of the Emir of 
Kuwait, told a crowd of 500 
cheering Kuwaiti dem¬ 
onstrators yesterday that they 
would overcome Iraq's inva¬ 
sion if they stuck together. 
“Kuwait is going through a 
veiy hard time but if we stick 
together we will overcome the 
challenge.” Salem Jaber al- 
Ahmed al-Sabah, said before 
the crowd inarched to the UN 
headquarters building to de¬ 
mand immediate UN action 
to force Iraq out. 

In C hina an official news¬ 
paper yesterday accused the 
United States of raising ten¬ 
sion in the Middle East by 
sending warships to the Gulf 
and freezing Iraqi financial 
assets. “The purpose of 
America's involvement in the 
conflict is to divide the Arab 
camp and isolate Iraq so as to 
reduce pressure on Israel" a 
leading article in the China 
Youth News said. 


reprieve 

From Martin Fletcher 1 
IN WASHINGTON 

THE Iraqi invasion of Kuwait 
will temper a congressional 
drive to impose sweeping cuts 
on the Pentagon's 1991 bud¬ 
get, and already has arguably 
saved the $63 billion (£34 
billion) B2 stealth bomber 
programme from almost cer¬ 
tain termination in a Senate 
vote on Thursday night. - 
The invasion came qt a 
critical moment in Honseand 
Senate deliberations on their 
respective defence Nils, and 
has bolstered administration 
attempts to stave off precip¬ 
itate cats in America's mili¬ 
tary strength after 
communism's collapse. . 

President Bush, in a speech 
in Colorado on Thmaday 
night, said: 'Terrorism, ^bos- 

tage-taking, renegade regimes 
and unpredictable ruler* — 
new sources of instability—all 
require a strong and engaged 
America. The events (m Ku¬ 
wait) underscore, &&>, the 
vital need for a defence struc¬ 
ture that not only preserves 
our security, but pnmdes'the 
resources' for sapporimjg the 
legitimate selfdefence needs 
of our friends and allies.^ 
Robert Pole, the Repub¬ 
lican minority leader in the 
Senate, said that the inva¬ 
sion’s silver lining was that it 
acted as a “wake-up caB” for 
Congress. 

Events in the Middle East 
dominated the debate, which 
preceded a Senate vote on 
whether to allocate $4.6 bil¬ 
lion next year to the radar- 
evading B2, the world’s most 
expensive and advanced war¬ 
plane. The 53-45 vote wasthe 
narrowest margin in the air¬ 
craft's controversial- history, 
and could conceivably have 
gone the other way had it not 
been for President Saddam 
Hussein. 

Continuation of the pro¬ 
gramme is not yet assured. 
The Senate vote sets the scene 
fora September co n fro n tation 
with the House, which is 
considered certain to endorse 
this week’s overwhelming 
vote by its armed; services 
committee to end B2 produc¬ 
tion after completion of the 15 
now -on border. The Senate 
strengthened its 
position by malting 
conditional on 
perfonnancetcsoL 
With Margaret Thatcher at f 
his side, Mr Bush used^ftis 
Colorado speech to reload to 
congressional criticism, that 
the Pentagon has failed to 
adjust to the post-Gold War 
world. He announced that be 
aimed to cut US > military 
strength of Z1 million active 
service troops by 25 per cent 
by 1995 and gave the outlines 
of a Pentagon plan radically to 
revise its force structures. 

Undo* the new policy of 
“peaceful engagement” there 
would be more emphasis on 
rapid deployment contingency 
forces and “reconstitutable” 
reserves, and less on the- 
defence of Western Europe, 
though forward defence in My 
areas would remain an essen- 

tial element of future strategy. 

In the absence of a long¬ 
term Pentagon plan for the 
post-Cold War era, the House 
in particular had sought to 
impose deep cuts of its own 
next year. It has before it a 
defence bill which would slash 
$24 billion from the Penta¬ 
gon's $307 billion budget re¬ 
quest, and kill, postpone or 
delay many big weapon pro¬ 
grammes — moves which 
Richard Cheney, the defence 
secretary, has warned would 
wreak havoc on the US 
military. 

Mr Bush warned Congress 
against malting arts with a 
meat axe rather than scalpel 
“The US would be Hi-served 
by forces that represent noth¬ 
ing more than a scaled-back or 
shrunken-down version, ofthe 
ones we possess at present," 

The B2 vote came as the 
Senate began consideration of 
its version of a defence bill 
which would cut $\8 biffion 
trom the Pentagon’s 199! 
request, a reduction which Mr 
Cheney says he can live with. 



The horror of Halabja that should have warned the world 

M thermoh thp Wirfv winrinu/ of — .iianii j -i*. j. - n 


EVEN through the dirty window of 
an Iranian army Huey helicopter 
the enormity of the crime was 
clearly visible. The bodies lay in 
neat groups along the unpaved 
streets of Halabja, a market town in 
Iraqi Kurdistan. 

Whole families had died, some 
in the back of pick-up trucks that 
had tried too late to escape, others 
in home-made air raid shelters, 
which might have saved them from 
bullets, but were little defence 
against chemical weapons. 

One of the most grotesque 
incidents in the war between Iran 
and Iraq, the attack by Iraqi 
warplanes on Halabja in March 
1988. convinced President Saddam 
Hussein not only that he could 
escape punishment for ruthless 
actions but that aggression could 
intimidate neighbours and poten- 


The Iraqi chemical weapons attack against Kurds 
in 1988 held a lesson which Nicholas Beeston says 
the West may have learnt too late 


tial rivals. Today, as the Western 
powers and the Soviet Union 
decide to take united action against 
Iraq, President Saddam may be 
forgiven for believing that once 
again he will get away with one of 
his most daring gambits. 

Since he invaded Iran in 1980, 
the Iraqi leader has been lectured to 
by the world, particularly by 
Western nations. Privately, how¬ 
ever. he has been helped to build 
the most powerful military ma¬ 
chine in the region: French war¬ 
planes, Soviet tanks, and the 
combined resources of European, 
American and Asian military 


equipment Despite the recent 
success of US and British customs 
agents in preventing pans for a 
“supeigun" and components of a 
nuclear bomb from reaching Iraq, 
there are widespread fears that a 
clampdown on exporting technol¬ 
ogy to the country has come too 
late. 

The Iraqi military, with help 
from German companies, has 
established a chemical weapons 
production facility and French 
technicians helped it to repair a 
nuclear reactor after it was bombed 
by Israeli warplanes. Last year 
British firms were queueing up to 


attend the Baghdad military fair 
held only a few months after the 
Gulf War ceasefire. 

Iraq’s has pilots with combat war 
experience and has successfully 
developed, probably with Korean 
or Chinese assistance, medium 
range missiles which hit Tehran 
with regularity during the Gulf 
War. It is also possible that it has a 
biological weapons capability. 

At the time of the Gulf war we 
were terrified that the Iranians, 
fired by religious zeal, would win 
foe war. overthrow foe regime in 
Baghdad and effectively control foe 
Persian Gulf” said Richard Mur- 
phy former US assistant Secretary 
of State for foe Middle East, 
yesterday. “In retrospect it would 
nave been preferable to have 
limited the flow 0 f arms to Iraq, 
particularly from France and the 


Soviet Union, but we were not m a 
position to stop it” 

tri Y iLS? n a J ter M ^ Mirage 

r I fired two Exocet missiles at foe 

frigate USS Stark, killing 37 Ameri- 
can sailors rn May 1987, Wash¬ 
ington and its Western allies 
focused attention keeping opm 

*e Guif. ra “ te! ° n lhC 

^ Vest protected the ofl 
flow from the Gulf states, all of 


n£ V ts en J^' S h <tep,orablc 

^verai ■ 

SSiSk-srs 

.PnsKicm Saddam was summed 


UP well by none other toS ■ 
^ deputy foreign 

m --- ...an OI V s Paorod in The 

whom were supporting i ra n Bagh- {ourntd yesterday 

dad bombed Iranian shippjmtand another despot. , " 

0,1 fliriHa appease- 
^ never condemned tremfnP 16 WOr ^ teamed that at 
Pnsndent Saddam for starting the C l§l£ T)m thc Mustek ■ 

Gulf war. attacking dvifiangS 1938-HowcouSdfoe 

pmgm foe Gulf in 1984, STL*?** °*>pose Hide? 

and executing thousands or Iraqi Proven himself 

crimes and us^i!^** 


0 


4 


4 * 




- ctever at 
Ionian as m a 
reasonable.” 


putting focir 
that seems 


• I ' CA 





OVERSEAS NEWS 7 



THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


The invasion of Kuwait: Iraq’s choices 


i i.' 


Threat to Saudi Arabia raises risk of Nato i 


By Michael Evans 
■»® iCEC 0 RREsP 0 NDENT 
PRESIDENT Saddam H, 

Ambi rSSsSSS “f &ndi 

m Ihe Gulfed Se 

associated with wL°”f r P oa dosel y 

mmi 

Sin™ 1 «mon3it te 

used if Iraq went any further. 

fte <^vafcm of at 

SSteJsst-a 

wSS of 

J™® Pv&uleni Saddam wifl send 
th? ICy “* ““wied merely to 

nS5, ULc 1 ? 6 P 1 ®? 111 ® or > the other oil 
producers to conform to his wishes over 

ETrtS -**? iCy “T 6 ^ questions exercis¬ 
ing the international community 

His next target could be Bahrain, 
Qatar, or the United Arab Emirs^ * ^. uk 
Kmyajt then- conquest would involve a 
straigiit f o rwa rd military operation. 
World condemnation of the invasion of 



Kuwait will certainly not put back any of 
his plana v 

John Laffin, an expert on the Middle 
East , and author of many books on the 
Arabs,_ said: “1 don’t think any amount 
°f United Nations posturing will stop 
him. He will revel in the worldwide 
■ condem nation because it will undetiine 
foal he is foe most powerful leader in the 
Arab world. He has humiliated President 
Mubarak of Egypt, who had tried to talk 
him out of acting against Kuwait, so he 
will be seen as the dominant figure in the 
Arab world.” 

President Saddam’s real target must, 
however, be Saudia Arabia, with whom 
he has signed a non-aggression pact 
Senator David Boren, chairman of the 
US Senate intelligence c ommittee , s aid 
yesterday that “a possible invasion of 
Saudi Arabia cannot be ruled out". This 

would be a high risk operation. The Iraqi 
leader may newer have been trained as a 
soldier, but be is shrewd. He knows that 

action against Saadi Arabia will force the 

Americans to come to zts rescue, since 
Washington has guaranteed help to 
Saudi Arabia in the event of military 
threat.' - 

There appears at present to be no 
direct threat to Saudi Arabia, but 
America faces a dil emma- it cannot 
contemplate a pre-emptive move but 
must wait until h is asked for help. 


Moreover, to set up a proper force, with 
the appropriate logistics, the Americans 
. would need a base from which to 
operate. The only bases are in Arab 
Countries and none has yet shown any 
willingness or desire to stand up to 
President Saddam. Saudi Arabia has 
always been adamant that no foreign 
base will be allowed on its territory. This 
is as much a matter of national pride as 
of a bebef in tbe Middle East that a 
foreign military presence would in¬ 
evitably attract conflict 
Granting the Americans basing rights 
would he seen in Baghdad as deliberately 
provocative. Perhaps the best chance for 
the Americans would be an offer of a 
base in Egypt, which has very close ties 
with the United States and yesterday 
called on Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. 
American and Egyptian forces each year 
hold training exercises based on possible 
joint intervention in the Middle EasL 
Hie Pentagon has contingency plans 
for intervening in the Middle East to 
protect Western oil supplies and the 
30,000 American citizens Jiving in the 
region, 3,800 of them in Kuwait. Yet it 
does not have a property centralised 
rapidly deployable out-of-area capab¬ 
ility. The only country with such a a 
capability is France with a 47,000-strong 
Rapid Action Force. 

The Americans could lift two di¬ 


visions, the 82nd Airborne, based at Fort 
Bragg, North Carolina, and the # J01st 
Airborne, based at Fort Campbell, 
Kentucky, which could probably reach 
Saudi Arabia in 72 hours. These units arc 
on a normal 12-hour notice to mobilise. 
Both were used in the American 
invasion of Panama, but they are not 
heavily equipped and have only light 
armour. Their role would be to hold 
positions until heavy armoured units 
arrived. That would* take some time, 
however, because they could only be 
brought to the Gulf by sea. 

Pentagon officials said President 
Bush’s military options were limited and 
that it would take several weeks at least 
to deploy a significant coumertbrce. The 
naval force already in the Gulf and the 
Independence carrier battle group 
approaching from the Indian Ocean pose 
no threat to Iraqi ground forces. 

Another option is to use amphibious 
forces. There are two US combat Marine 
expeditionary units at present at sea. 
each numbering about 2,200 men. One is 
off Liberia in a four-vessel naval group, 
and the other is in tbe Pacific off the 
Philippines. There are also about fifteen 
"maritime prepositioning ships", based 
at Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean, 
which are stocked with everything from 
ammunition to food. 

Logistics and timing would be crucial 


if Iraq decided to move against Saudi 
Arabia. Dr Laffin said: “The Iraqis 
would not need to overrun Saudia 
Arabia. They wouldn’t be able to because 
it is such a large country. But all they 
have to do is cross the border and make 
for Riyadh, the capital. This is the nerve 
centre for the whole country so. psycho¬ 
logically, the Iraqis would have captured 
the whole country. From Riyadh they 
could dictate terms to the Saudis and 
hold control over the oil fields.” 

Also, several key installations would 
be vulnerable to precision attacks, 
among them the huge water desalination 
plants, some of which are relatively dose 
to the border with Kuwait. One is in the 
village of Ras al Khalji. 20 miles from 
the Kuwaiti border. Another is 40 or so 
miles from the Iraqi border in the 
military complex of Hafer al Batin, 
which includes an air and army base. 
There are also desalination plants at 
Jubail and Al Khubar, further down the 
Saudi coasL Jubail water is piped to 
Riyadh. Saudi Arabia is wholly depen¬ 
dent on desalination, but the defence of 
these facilities is reported to be minimal. 

Washington has another option 
because of the changed rircumstances in 
central Europe. It would be possible for 
the Americans to ship some of their 
6,000 tanks from West Germany to the 
Middle East, a far quicker option. 


Undoubtedly that would involve special 
political decisions. Bonn would have to 
agree but, since West Germany imports 
oil. it is unlikely to protest too much. 

Moscow, though, would also have to 
be intimately involved in the decision¬ 
making. The Soviet Union would have 
to be told that elements of US forces in 
West Germany were being mobilised for 
an out-of-area operation, and Moscow 
would have to agree with the potential 
use of force against Iraqi troops. Britain 
would also be expected to play a key role. 
Cyprus could be used as a transit base. 

The Saudis on their own could not 
hold back the Iraqis. The country is in 
the process of re-equipping its armed 
forces. Al present Saudi armour consists 
of 300 French AMX3Q. 50 .American 
M60A1 and 200 M60A3 battle tanks, all 
older generation vehicles. 

As a direct threat to targets in Iraq, the 
Saudis have CSS 2 "Dong Feng" (East 
Wind) intermediate-range ballistic mis¬ 
siles with conventional warheads sup¬ 
plied by the Chinese, but these are 
notoriously inaccurate. 

0 Artillery' deployed: The Iraqis have 
brought with them to Kuwait a number 
of artillery command and recon¬ 
naissance vehicles. Soviet ACRV2s, 
which, equipped with laser range-find¬ 
ers. provide computerised information 
for accurate artillery barrages. '/ 



puppet 
rulers may prove 
hard for Saddam 


PRESIDENT Saddam Hus¬ 
sein has had such an easy 
success with his seizure of 
Kuwait that be may be under¬ 
estimating the political diffi¬ 
culties he now faces. 

He has said he will with¬ 
draw in days, or perhaps 
weeks, as soon as a “genuine 
and free" national Kuwait 
government is established. He 
must, therefore, find a group 
of Kuwaitis who would agree 
to form a puppet government 
which might conceivably be 
recognised by other Arab 
states, and especially by Ku¬ 
wait's five fellow members of 
the Gulf Co-operation Coun¬ 
cil led by Saudi Arabia. The 
alternative would be outright 
annexation of Kuwait. 

Kuwait’s existence as an 
independent state depends on 
the al-Sabiah- family. They 
created it in the 18th century 
and it has survived through 
their determination to defend 
its borders, but above all 
through tbe diplomatic skills 
of the Kuwaiti emirs in per¬ 
suading much stronger out¬ 
side powers and neighbours 
that it was more in their 
interests that Kuwait should 
survive than to be swallowed 


By Peter Mansfield 

up by any one of them. This 
was what happened when 
Kuwait was first threatened by 
. an Iraqi takeover immediately 
after independence in 1961. £f 
the af-Sabab family is de¬ 
posed, Kuwait no longer has a 
raison dene and -the fiction 
that Iraq intervened on behalf 
of true Kuwaiti nationalists 
would be destroyed. 

The elements for a puppet 
regime do not exist Oppo¬ 
sition to the regime did exist 
and was of two kinds: middle- 
class liberals and islamir rad¬ 
icals or fundamentalists. 

The first are represented by 
those members of parliament 
who opposed its closure in 
1986 and the halTmeasures 
taken to restore it last June. 
Someare highly critical of tbe 
al-Sabahs, and include some 
representatives of the grand 

m mham femilwi!t w|wv»9«n. 

ciation with the administra¬ 
tion of an independent 
Kuwait goes bade as long as 
that of the family. But this 
does mean that they would be 
prepared to act as agents for 
President Saddam. . 

Hie other opposition ele¬ 
ment is even less likely ma¬ 
terial. Hie Islamic radicals 


A nation united 
in its adversity 

By Andrew McEwen, diplomatic editor 


THE valedictory telegram of a 
former British ambassador to 
Kuwait described the country 
as “a mercantile arrange¬ 
ment" in which every Kuwaiti 
was a shareholder and no 
citizen was allowed to lose 
money. 

However autocratic the al- 
Sabah family may have been, 
it ensured its people enjoyed 
the benefits of oil wealth, with 
generous welfare services. Its 
policies created an outward¬ 
looking society with a strong 
community feeling, even if its 
sense of nationhood was open 
to question. 

Diplomats and journalists 
who have lived there describe 
it as a more cohesive society 
than its divisions of national¬ 
ity, religion and wealth might 
suggest- Kuwaiti nationals 
make up only a third of the 
population of 1.8 million, yet 
account for virtually all the 
top positions and most pi the 
wealth. The religious divide is 
approximately 75 per cent 
Sunni Muslim. 25 per cent 
Shia Muslim in population 
terms, but tbe Sunnis are even 
more dominant in the eco¬ 
nomy. Far from exacerbating 
tensions, the invasion is ex¬ 
pected to reinforce national 

unity. . . __ 

If Baghdad shares these 
views, there are implications 
for its management of the 
country. It has stud that tt 
acted in support of a revolu- 
lionary movement and will 
withdraw within <teys or 
weeks. Few will have believed 
this, but it implies that Bagh¬ 
dad thinks it can msrall a 

puppet government If inis is 

indeed its pian-^ 
hope to attract knownKj 1 ^ 111 
figures to give it credibility. 

Peter Mansfield, authorof 
Kuwait. 

said this would be extremely 
difficult. None of the groui» 
the Iraqis might approach 
would be likely to co-operate. 
^fSirliament^t^^ 
would seem thc f ? es L^! 
didalc. because of ns resent- 
tneni against the al-Sabah 
family fOTisso‘ vin f ^ 
ionai assembly in 1986. Ehi 
Mr Mansfield sajdjhaun the 
face of Iraqi 

opposition had united behind 

tbe royal family. 

Few were mom cntical m 


the past than Ahmed Saa- 
doum, former Speaker of the 
assembly. But within hours of 
the invasion his wife was on 
the steps of tbe Kuwaiti 
embassy in London beseech¬ 
ing journalists to disregard 
Iraqi attempts to discredit the 
al-Sabah family. 

Two other groups whose 
loyalty might have been 
doubted were the substantial 
non-Kuwaiti . Shia Muslim 
population, and thousands of 
Iraqis resident in Kuwait. Mr 
Mansfield said that the Sbias 
were out of tbe question 
because some would be 
sympathetic to Iran, while the 
resident Iraqis tended to be 
oil-industry managers with no 
particular loyalty to President 
Saddam Hussein. 

This point was disputed by 
an Iraqi exile living in 
London, who said that there 
were 35,000 Iraqis in pro¬ 
fessional positions in Kuwait 
who were members of the 
Baath party and could form 
the nucleus of a government. 
Some were in the army. 

Hie long delay in announc¬ 
ing the names of the “transi¬ 
tional free government” has 
underlined Iraq’s difficulties 

and further weakened its 

credibility. Two former Brit¬ 
ish ambassadors to Kuwait 
feel, however, that Baghdad 
carts linle whether the gov¬ 
ernment is considered legiti¬ 
mate or not. **I can’t think of 
anv full-blooded Kuwaiti who 
would put himself forward 
(for the puppet government). 
But I don't think Saddam 
Hussein gives a damn " said 
Sir Archie Lamb; 

He pointed ont that the 
Baath socialist parly in Iraq 
had long said it wanted to 
bring down “the feudal re¬ 
gimes of the Gulf”. President 
Saddam should be seen in the 
same light as Hitler, except 
that he had been more open 
about his intentions. Resi¬ 
dent Saddam’s ambitions for 
the other emirates were not 
hidden. 

Sir John Wilton said the 
new government would he no 
more legitimate, but no less ef¬ 
fective, than those which ruled 
Eastern Europe until last year. 

“The puppet government will 
work because it will have Iraqi 
bayonets behind iL M 


were responsible for acts of 
assassination and sabotage at 
- the height of tbe Gulf war. 
Fifteen are still in jail and 
Kuwait has resolutely rejected 
afl the pressure from other 
extremists through acts of 
hijacking and hostage-taking 
to release them. They are 
almost all Shia Muslims and 
are mainly of Iranian origin. If 
they hale the al-Sabahs. they 
hate President Saddam much 
more: he stands for everything 
they most detest. 

There is an alternative for 
President Saddam- He could 
conceivably gather together a 
group of non-Kuwaiti Arabs 
who might be prepared to 
form a government. Some 
would be from the Gulf region 
and some northern Arabs: Pal¬ 
estinians. Egyptians, Lebanese 
and a few Iraqis. His argument 
would be that Kuwait is part 
of the united Arab world and 
belong to all Arabs. 

. This would not be very 
convincing but he has one 
great advantage, and this is the 
muted reaction -of the other 
Arabs. It was initially left to 
Morocco, Algeria and embat¬ 
tled Lebanon (under Syrian 
occupation) to denounce the 
invasion. The other members 
of. the. Gulf Co-operation 
Council, who have since con¬ 
demned the invasion, were 
hedging in the hope they could 
persuade Iraq to accept a 
compromise. But it is still 
difficult to see what means 
they have of persuading Presi¬ 
dent Saddam to abandon his 
demand for the removal of the 
at-Sabahs. This is now the 
crucial issue. 

The Arab foreign ministers 
have passed the responsibility 
to the Arab summit due to 
take place in Cairo this week¬ 
end. Win Kuwait be repre¬ 
sented at this summit by 
Sheikh Jaber al-Sabah, the 
emir, and will the council 
continue to recognise him and 
bis government? 

If they continue to do so and 
encourage him to set up a 
govenment-in-exile, this will 
not be enough to force an Iraqi 
withdrawal to be followed by 
the return of tbe al-Sabahs. 
But it would amount to total 
Arab rejection of Iraq's action. 

If they fail to support a 
Kuwaiti goveramentrin-exile 
they are undermining the 
Intimacy of thefr own re¬ 
gimes in the case of all the 
smaller sheikhdoms, where 
die ruling family in each case 
is the raison fibre of the state. 
Iran, for example, has a long¬ 
standing claim to Bahrain. 
The question of whether the 
emir will still be regarded as 
the legitimate ruler of Kuwait 
in tbe rest of the Arabian pe¬ 
ninsula will be of crucial 
importance in coming weeks. 



Invasion joy: Iraqis carrying banners and photographs of President Saddam throng Baghdad's streets to celebrate the invasion of Kuwait 


Peter Mansfield is author of 
Kuwait, Vanguard of the Gulf. 


Gulf states maintain silence 


From Reuter in Cairo 


IN THE United Arab Emir¬ 
ates the silence was deafening. 
By noon yesterday, radio and 
television had still not men¬ 
tioned tbe Iraqi invasion. As 
in other Gulf states, the first 
most people heard of it was 
from foreign radio stations. 

“How can they do that in 
the late 20th century when a 
fellow state has been invaded? 
What do they think they are 
going to achieve?" asked one 
resident. Along with Kuwait, 
the United Arab Emirates is 
accused by Iraq of undermin¬ 
ing world oil prices by 
overproducing. 

King Fahd of Saudi Arabia 
appealed for calm on the day 
of the invasion, but did not 
say why this was necessary. 
Not once was the word inva¬ 
sion used. When the story 


broke. Gulf residents Socked 
to big hotels equipped with 
international television and 
news agency teleprinter ser¬ 
vices. Gulf newspapers finally 
put the news on their front 
pages yesterday, 24 hours after 
Iraqi tanks rolled into Kuwait. 

In Bahrain, state radio still 
ignored the invasion yester¬ 
day. In Saudi Arabia, media 
reaction was confused. On 
Thursday night, television 
carried an interview with the 
Kuwaiti ambassador in Wash¬ 
ington who described the in¬ 
vasion and appealed for help. 

But yesterday, Saudi news¬ 
papers merely reported that 
King Fahd was concerned to 
reduce tension between Ku¬ 
wait and Iraq, without stating 
the cause. One Saudi tele¬ 
vision report showed Kuwait's 


ruling al-Sabah family, who 
fled the invasion, “visiting" 
the kingdom, but did not say 
why they were there. 

None of Kuwait's Gulf al¬ 
lies — Saudi Arabia, the 
United Arab Emirates, Qatar, 
Oman and Bahrain — has 
condemned the invasion or 
threatened counter-action de¬ 
spite being linked in a joint 
defence pact. 

In contrast. Cairo’s press 
was outspoken in criticising 
the invasion. The semi-official 
al-Ahram chose Mood-red ink 
for its banner headline, “A 
terrifying Arab disaster". 

“This is the blackest day in 
the history of Arabs ... it 
returns them to tbe early days 
of Jahiliya (the age of bar¬ 
barism) when the sword ruled 
and the spilling of blood was 


the way to solve problems,” 
the newspaper declared. 

Saeed Sonbol, a columnist 
in Egypt's mass-circulation al- 
Akhbar, wrote: "It is strange 
that at a time when we call to 
end the Arab-Israeli conflict 
peacefully, we seek to solve 
the Kuwaiti-Iraqi dispute us¬ 
ing military force." 

There was muted support 
for Iraq in the Jordanian 
press. “If some are blaming 
Iraq ... we urge them not to 
disregard a long chain of 
positions taken against Iraqi 
interests,” Ad-Dusior said. 

• Broadcast boost: The BBC 
World Service has increased 
its broadcasts in Arabic 
because of the invasion, by 
one bour in the evening and 
balf an hour in its early 
morning programme. 



Izzat Ibrahim, left, vice-chairman of Iraq's ruling council, meeting Crown Prince Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz, Saudi 
Arabia's deputy prime minister, in Jedda yesterday. Mr Ibrahim's failed talks with Kuwait preceded the invasion 


Kuwait’s 
radio and 
TV go off 
the air 

From AFP and Reuter 

IN KUWAIT 

OFFICIAL Kuwait radio went 
off the air yesterday after 
repealed appeals for Arab and 
Western help to drive out 
invading Iraqi troops. 

The radio, staffed by gov¬ 
ernment loyalists, had’ been 
broadcasting calls for resis¬ 
tance. appeals for help and 
patriotic music since Iraq's 
invasion of Kuwait al dawn 
on Thursday. It went off the 
air at 2.30am, residents said. 

The radio was not broad¬ 
casting from Kuwait but from 
a neighbouring country that 
could well have been Saudi 
Arabia, a reliable source said. 
Crown Prince Saad al-Sabah, 
the prime minister, went on 
the air on Thursday to urge the 
people to resist. 

The state-run Kuwaiti tele¬ 
vision also abruptly stopped 
its programmes at iOam >es- 
terday. But a lone Kuwaiti 
radio station was still broad¬ 
casting more than 24 hours 
after the invasion, appealing 
desperately for Arab help. 
“Where are the Arab accords? 
Where arc the Gulf accords? 
Where are the Islamic ac¬ 
cords? This is the lime to 
implement them.” said Huna 
Kuwait (This is Kuwait). 

In a separate broadcast at 
1.50am the radio said that the 
Kuwaiti armed forces were 
continuing to light the inva¬ 
sion fiercelv. 


Baghdad troops consolidate position in Kuwait 



From Agenctes 

IN KUWAIT 

KUWAIT'S greatly outnumbered 
forces continued to battle against 
invading Iraqi troops yesterday, and 
the sounds of fighting echoed across 
the capital. 

Explosions heard between 6 am 
and 7am appeared to come from 
Shuwaikfa, as army barracks on the 
city outskirts where Kuwaiti forces 
have been resisting the invading 
Iraqi troops. 

A radio station broadcasting from 
a secret location urged Kuwaitis to 
repel the predawn invasion. “We 
say no to surrender... the Iraqis are 
the Tatars of the 20th century ” 
Huna Kuwait (This is Kuwait) 
declared in its earty morning 
broadcasts. 

The extent of Kuwaiti resistance 
was unclear. It appeared that the 


invasion army was consolidating its 
hold on the small Gulf state. 
Regional radio stations said that tbe 
Iraqis, backed by tanks, helicopter 
gunships and occasional jet fighter 
support, now controlled the coun¬ 
try’s main oil installations, situated 
to the south of Kuwait City. 

The city was under curfew, but 
from behind their windows res¬ 
idents watched a show of Iraqi force 
when 200 tanks danked through the 
capital on Thursday evening. Some 
tanks drew up along the seafront 
with their guns trained towards the 
Gulf where, further to the south. 
United Slates warships were on 
patrol. 

Among the first proclamations 
issued by the “provisional" govern¬ 
ment installed by Iraq was one 
seizing the assets of the emir Sheikh 
Jaber al-Sabah, Down Prince Saad 


al-Sabah, and the defence minister, 
Nawaf al-Jaber. It also confiscated 
the assets of the Kuwaiti envoys to 
the US, the United Nations and the 
Arab League, calling them “merce¬ 
naries of the defunct regime". 

The government, which Iraq has 
so for not identified by name, said 
that it was acting because the emir 
and his “clique" squandered money 
in the pursuit of pleasure, and 
deposited it with “suspect partners". 

“Our government warns foreign 
hanks in which they deposited their 
money against any tampering with 
this money in a manner banning the 
Kuwaiti people," a communique 
said. 

Occupying Iraqi troops have 
adopted tbe Sheraton hotel in a 
Kuwaiti suburb as their head¬ 
quarters, eschewing the government 
buildings they seized earlier on 


Thursday for the hotel's more 
comfortable lodgings. 

Most people seemed unaware of 
the revolutionary council that, 
according to the Iraqis, had taken 
over power. 

Apart from the fighting, scenes 
from the occupied city bordered on 
the bizarre. 

In one area on Thursday night 
about 30 Kuwaitis stood patiently in 
line, waiting to rent video-cassette 
movies for the night. The reason, in 
the words of one of them, was that 
most residents were staying at home 
and “sitting tight". 

Many cars were left in the streets, 
some not even parked but merely 
abandoned as if the drivers saw the 
approaching troops and fled. Roads 
and footpaths in pans of the city 
have been damaged and churned up 
■ by foe hundreds of Iraqi tanks that 


entered Kuwait Some of foe Iraqi 
troops drove around ‘.he capital in 
confiscated Kuwaiti police cars. 

At a roundabout troops milled 
about, sitting, eating and talking 
while rocket-launchers stood 
nearby. About !G0 soldiers wan¬ 
dered around outside the Sheraton. 
In the centre of Kuwait City, foe 
streets were largely deserted, it was 
only out in the suburbs that local 
residents dared to venture outside 
for long. 

The only sign of domestic unrest 
was spot panic-buying in foe super¬ 
markets. where residents shopped 
quickly and headed right home. 

In the city centre Iraqi troops were 
stationed at key government offices, 
which included the defence and 
information ministries, the Central 
Bank of Kuwait and foe National 
.Assembly- 









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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


WATERPROOF. 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Froms IanMurray in bonn . 

*ain to bp-reunited MMOa;?£ £?^ I>arKain « 1 ^ of fee’five 
planned; SSrS b ® eo "WJnsi&utaL 

.-a pan-German ^^^fiwaimiversaiy ofi 
government capable of ending the.fell of Ejrich Honecfcer- as 
the msecunty and uacenamty the hanfliiwcoinmuiiistniler, 
jmicb is dwtemining what is “d almost a. month: before 
leu of the East German econ- that , of die opening 
0my v^ K * ra * s ®g fears of Berlin-WalL , 

MGther mass exodus from Horde Maizfem made his 
east to west announcement as the; treaty- 

' Theeariy date was nronosed aBMd'Mtidi sets 

by Lothar de Maizitre. the out the system forthe election 
East Gennan prime ministers by.-wfichjmne : aiiwn partfci- 

and quickly -accepted bv *“1. “= ^Piggybacked" into 
Helmut Kohl, the West Ger- I ^ r ^ an5 * nl ***& the. help of 
man chancellor, who is likely ■ “Berparties. Theamuge- 
to become the first nostwar me ntbco®is. the government 
chancellor of a united Ger- P? rt,es ’ and effectively blocks 
many as aiesult of the chance. “* communists from gaining 
wn,. -n>. • ,. £ '’ • even a tiny handful of seats. - 

'SSMXaSfi 

Maiztere said in^feaJnLr 6 ^eariierdatem^ the wishes 
satd m East B«lm of the people in both counr 

Jwuld^hefn^? tries. Astride .unity process 

^? our ^ e would rtduce the tran&ional 

OctSL tl ^ agreement .last month 

^ daIe on the external aspects of 
was already fixed for elections reunification, HerrKoUlaid,. 

■ • . ' ■■ ■ ' drawing attention to his per- r 

T7 r L • sonal diplomatic triumph in 

Kaiinria’c persuading President ,Gorb- ' 
liaUI IU d a achev-to lift objections to 
o An Germanntembershipof Nato. 

MIU snoiua Herrjde Maizfere also .said 

n .«<--■ that the \way to quick unity 

T21C& lTlSll" had been Cleared bytheagrec- 
iavc u "“ mentwrthfcfr Gorbachev. J 
Lusaka — The son ofPresf- Volker Jftube, general seb- 
dent Kattnda must be dunged retary ofthe Christian Demo- 
with the murder of a young crats, - said fee’chtaceUbr's 
woman here last September, a party was convinced. 1 theear- . 
Zambian coroner ruled yies^ tier date “will qtridldy end the 
terday. The public prosecutor uncertainty which many of ■■ 
will now decide whether to our. compatriots in East Ger- " 


prosecute. The enquiry found 
that the death of Tabeth 
Mwanza, aged 20, who was 
shot through the back of the 
head, was murder. Mr 
Kambarage Kaunda, aged 25, 
told the enquiry; “I admi t' I 
.fired the fetal shot which 
killed her.” But he said he' 
acted in self defence. [Reuter) 

Singh’s day 

Delhi — Vjsfawaaaib Pmtqi 1 


many fed."-.-' 

-. Ah October election is a. 
serious blow; to the. «Hm 
remaining chances of victory 
for Oskar Lafonlaine, the 
Social Democrat' (SPD) can¬ 
didate for chancellor. JJerr 
Lafontaine showed his dis¬ 
appointment at being out¬ 
manoeuvred once again, 
saying that the.change was 
nothing bdt a pankr move 
designed -to-deny doctors a 
considered mid balanced vote 


Singh, the fndian prnntMnin- °® the frmtre of Germany. .V= 
isieri wona unanimous vote Tte SPD inEast Germany, 
of confidence fipm-his party an rm^ppy member of Herr 
yesterday, consobdatinghjs tie Mahmre's coalitiqn, was 
position in fee minority gov- equally festitased. li accused 
erument after, sacking Devi the prime ministerofasudden 
Lai, his deputy. (AP) . change -ofdirection^ brought 

about by again bowing to the 

Lightning deaths 'SSMfffiJSSK 

West Palm Beach, Florida — theejeetion. . 


Barbara Buchanan, aged 31; 
and her daughter Michelle 
died when lightning appar- 


The Greens, who already 
risk losing their presence in 
fee Bundestag in the election. 


ently struck a pond and trav- denounced the move as. bring 
di ed up their fishing lines.' the kind, of thing which hap- 


Buchanan’s niece, eged II, 
who was hurled into the water, 
survived. (AP) 

Soyuz success 

Moscow — The Soviet Soyuz 
TM-10 spacecraft docked yes¬ 
terday at the Mir space station 
carrying two cosmonauts to 
take over from two others who 
have been living and working 
there for alm ost six months. 


pened in a dictatorship. The 
opposition's only chance ;iof 
string an early election is to 
block the idea jn the 
Buhdest^.- 

Although Herr Kohl stands 
togaia fiom early dections, it 
is also- nevertheless 1 true feat 
the lack of firm, experieiiced 
government in East Germany 
is a key fector in its plun^ng 
financial fortunes. 

• Forces redactions: The 


The spacecraft had lifted off 403.000 allied troops in Ger- 
on Wednesday. (AFP) many ought to be reduced by 

half by . ihe end of fee century. 

Rubbish fears 

East Berlin — McDonald's, said yesterday. . 
the fast-food chain, which He added that fee united 
wants to set up in East Berlin, German . army, numbering 
has promised to help formers 370,000 men,' would be made i 
by buying their produce. But up of 310,000 West Germans 1 


East Gennan politicians want and 60,000 East Germans. 
McDonald's to be banned. However,, no, more than 


saying its throw-away plastic 
canons will cause huge dis¬ 
posal problems. (Remer) 

Leading article, page 11 


30,000 of the youngest mem¬ 
bers of fee. present East Ger¬ 
man people’s army can expect 
to be integrated into the i 
i Bundeswehr, he said 


Baker offers aid 
to Mongolians 

From Catherine Sampson in Peking 


JAMES Baker, the US Sec¬ 
retary of State, found time to 
voice American ..support for 
Mongolia’s fledgeling demo¬ 
cracy before rushing off to 

Moscow yesterday, his visit 

cut short by fee Iraqi invasion 
of Kuwait. 

During his visit, Mr Baker 
offered Mongolia a $1.1 mil¬ 
lion f£595,000> US aid pack¬ 
age. He said feat “as Mongolia 
moves forward, to implement 
its reforms, fee United Stales 
wants to be of assistance . 

“I think the comroitmenftp 
reform is real herehe fflid, 
after discussing w 1 * 
golians the results of last 
week's fin* multi-party 
lions, which maintained fee 
communist Mongolia Peo¬ 
ple’s Revolutionary . Party in 

power, but gave a significant 
voice to opposition parties; m 
fee country’s legislature, the 
Liule HuraL 

Mr Baker had time to pose 
while drawing the string or a 
traditional bow and arrow 
before leaving, but had to 
abandon his plans to go 
hunting ibex in fee Mongolian 
wilds. His sudden and un¬ 


expected departure at mid- 
afternoon yesterday leaves his 
hosts with something of an 
anti-climax on their hands as 
they had made elaborate: pre¬ 
parations for their first high- 
level- US guest since fee two 
countries established dip¬ 
lomatic relations in 1987. 

Whatever their disappoint¬ 
ment, however.-Mr Baker said 
what Mongolians had been 
waiting to hear.. “We would 
like to grant Mongolia most 
favoured nation status as soon 
as we are satisfiedwith respect 
to the question of emigra¬ 
tion,” he said at a press 
conference before his depar¬ 
ture yesterday. Freedom of 
emigration is; fee main ai- 
terion on which sach trading 
status is awarded - by the 
United States. ; .. 

Foreign observers say that 
Mongolia, wife a- population 
of two- million, does- not 

appear to be fife of people who 
cannot waitio get out 

Mongolians are deeply at¬ 
tached to their- country and 
would rather • feat. foreigners 
came to thtm to give them a 
htipfeghand.; v 



OVERSEAS NEWS 


Cambodia 

guerrillas 



f T.. Vl ........J,.,., •*r 

'§fjl 'll* % y-0 

mm&mm'wbm 


Hi,. 

. 

> i, . . . .i.; 


5 - 881,1,1 Christopher Columbus' ships which sailed to America, being prepared i_ 

Huelva, Spain, yesterday for a two-year journey around Europe and America to mark fee 500th anniversary of the discovery of fee New World 


Hungarian MPs elect Goncz as first president 


From Ernest Beck 

7 - IN BUDAPEST 

ARPAD Goncz, a writer who lan¬ 
guished for six years in prison after 
the Soviet invasion of Hungary in 
1956, yesterday, swore fee oath of 
office as fee-first president of the new 
; Democratic Republic of Hungary. 

Mr Goncz, aged 68, who has served 
as interim president since May and is 


a member of fee opposition Alliance 
of Free Democrats, was elected by an 
overwhelming majority in par¬ 
liament, receiving support from all six 
parties represented. 

MPs were empowered to choose fee 
bead of slate after fee invalidation, 
because of a poor turnout, of last 
weekend’s national referendum on 
whether parliament or the people 
should elect him. In an emotional ac¬ 


ceptance speech Mr Goncz said he 
would continue to work for and def¬ 
end the ideals of freedom, democracy 
and human rights which had shaped 
his life. He said his nomination was 
not so much for him personally but 
for all those who served prison terms 
and fought with him in fee past 40 
years of communism. 

It was a dramatic moment for Mr 
Goncz. who served six years of a life 


term imposed in 1958 before being 
freed under a general amnesty. While 
he was in prison he taught himself 
English after obtaining a copy of 
Churchill's memoirs, and later be¬ 
came the first Hungarian translator of 
the works of William Faulkner. 

While the post of president is 
largely ceremonial. Mr Goncz is likely 
to use his prestige to become the 
conscience of fee nation. 


From Associated Press 
IN BANGKOK 

AFTER a two-month delay, 
fee Khmer Rouge agreed yes¬ 
terday to fee formation of a 
supreme national council as 
part of a peace settlement wife 
fee Cambodian government. 
The country’s other two guer¬ 
rilla factions agreed to fee 
council in June; but fee 
Khmer Rouge said it was not 
being treated as an equal and 
boycotted the plan. 

Khieu Samphan, of the 
Khmer Rouge leadership, said 
yesterday on Khmer Rouge 
radio that the group would 
participate “in fee meeting of 
all Cambodian parties ... to 
discuss the composition of fee 
supreme national council in a 
reconciliation spirit to most 
speedily set up this council”. 

But Hun Sen, fee Cam¬ 
bodian prime minister, has 
said the council's composition 
has been decided and has 
rejected calls for new talks. 

In a joint statement last 
month, the ministers of the 
Association of South East 
Asian Nations (Asean) called 
for fee urgent formation ofthe 
council They noted that some 
proposals have called for fee 
council to work with fee 
United Nations in governing 
Cambodia in fee period before 
elections. 



...... . 'V?'- «* 

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r . ’"’C*?.. . 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 



Clifford Longley 


T hese arc the dosing days of 
the British Council of 
Churches. Staff compacts 
expire next month, and after 48 
veaTS it will quietly die. Immed¬ 
iately out of the ashes will rise a 
new of institutions, and 
Christianity in Britain will begin 
to take a new shape. 

This change was one of the 
reasonsgiven by Dr Runcie tor the 
early announcement of his retire¬ 
ment. He is president of the BCC. 
and he wants his successor to be in 
position to play a leading role 
from the start in what is to follow. 
This also seems to be one of the 
main factors in the choice of his 
successor, and for the decision to 
announce the appointment so 
soon. 

These two factors are linked to 
a third: the official launch of the 
“decade of evangelism” next 
January. The new ecumenical 
institutions in Britain will be 
crucial to the decade of evan¬ 
gelism. which has been widely 
cited as another reason for Dr 
Carey's selection. However, the 
appointment has so for been seen 
exclusively in an Anglican rather 
than an ecumenical context. Yet 
the Crown Appointments Com¬ 
mission approached a cross-sec¬ 
tion of Roman Catholic and Free 
Church leaders for their views, 
and all emphasised that the next 
Archbishop of Canterbury should 
be someone with whom they could 
work closely in the new inter¬ 
church structures, and in bringing 
about the decade of evangelism. 

So three things are happening at^ 
the same time, but only one of 
them, the appointment of Dr 
Carey, has been widely reported. 
The other two provide the context 
needed to make complete sense of 
it. The Church of England has 
been accused many times of 
merely paying lip-service to ecu¬ 
menism while doing its own thing, 
but for once, with Dr Carey's 
appointment a key decision 
affecting the church's internal life 
has been strongly influenced by 
ecumenical considerations. 

These developments have been 
neglected even inside the 
churches, not least because their 
significance is hard to pin down. 
The new institutions have 
strangely coy — and to journalists' 
eyes off-putting — titles: Churches 
Together in England, Action of 
Churches Together in Scotland, 
and Churches Together in Wales. 
There will also be a new umbrella 
body called the Council of 
Churches for Britain and Ireland, 
about which the only thing that 
can be said for certain is that it will 
be very different from the British 
Council of Churches. 

These four bodies have been 
labelled “ecumenical instru¬ 
ments" and the negotiations lead¬ 
ing to their establishment have 
been called the Inter-Church Pro¬ 
cess, or sometimes, with scant 
attention to grammar, “Not 
Strangers but Pilgrims". At the 
heart of this impenetrable forest of 


...and moreover 

Matthew Parris 


T hose requiring proof of 
the socialist bias of the 
BBC need go no further 
than its coverage of the World¬ 
wide Fund for Nature con¬ 
troversy. Not once has the case 
against the giant panda been 
put. What do pandas expect? A 
meal ticket for life? Everyone is 
blaming the Worldwide Fund 
for Nature. Why is nobody 
blaming the panda? 

Responsibility for the im¬ 
minent demise of this ludicrous 
species should be placed 
squarely where it belongs: on 
the panda. By their own in¬ 
dolence and fussiness they have 
got themselves into this: and 
now they won't lift a paw to get 
themselves out. As Confucius 
put it: “Buck stop at desk of 
panda." 

So they are on their way oul 
Well, who isn't? In the long 
term, as Keynes said, we are all 
extinct. Lei us have an end to 
the wildlife dependency culture. 
Lei the message go out loud and 
clear to the rest of the furry 
flotsam and feathered jetsam, 
scrounging flora and couch- 
potatoes of the animal king¬ 
dom: the party's oxer. 

Readers of this column mav 
have noticed before my hostility 
to these sacred green cow?. But 
so far I have only scratched the 
surface of the great shambling 
Huffy heap of inadequacy which' 
is the giant panda. Caw' bless • 
you Prince Philip, but you arc 
out of your depth on this one. 
Lei me put you straight. Your 
Royal Highness: Ten Thin .cr 
You Didn't Know About 
Pandas ... 

O They are not cuddly at all. 
Their adorable "sun glasses" are 
a trick. They have foul, grumpy 
natures. They smelj. 

• They are the world's ultimate 
fusspots about food. Thev 
refuse to cat leftovers. They are 
actually carnivores but arc too 
idle to catch anything, and have 
opted instead for bamboo. 

• But their digestions arc not 
designed for bamboo. So a 
panda has to eat about 401b of it 
a day to keep going. Bamboo 
dies after flowering. The pandas 
do not appear to have thought 
ol this, and expect western 
chanties to organise relief 
supplies. 

9 Pandas have no sense of fun 
and none of community. Dis¬ 
liking the company even of 


other pandas, they have no 
family life. Pandas cannot re¬ 
turn affection. 

O They will do nothing to help 
themselves. They refuse to try 
new diets, adapt to new habi¬ 
tats. or learn circus tricks or 
television acts. 

19 Among expensive requests to 
the Worldwide Fund for Na¬ 
ture. these lovable welfare junk¬ 
ies are now demanding "bam¬ 
boo corridors" between the 
patches of their habitat. Other- 
w ise they refuse to travel. 

O Their fur is host to a mul¬ 
titude of small vermin. 

©They arc horribly prim about 
sex. They reject perfectly 
acceptablc mates, or sulk jus’t 
when the other is ready for 
romance. This is disastrous for 
panda procreation, as the fe¬ 
male is on heat for only one or 
two days in the year. 

© In the unlikely event that 
they do mate, the period of 
gesiation is interminable, the 
result a single, bald, half-formed 
mouse of a thing, which the 
mother then rolls on and 
squashes. The father doesn't 
want to know. Pandas make 
useless parents. 

© Never once has a panda been 
known to express gratitude tor 
western efforts to save it. They 
take our bamboo leaves then 
spit in our faces. 

Frankly, this shower are going 
nowhere. Pandas are not pulling 
their weight. 1 did not »ote lor 
Mrs Thatcher to featherbed a 
load of furry scroungers who 
think the world ow-es them a 
li'-ing. As Alan Walters says. 
"There’s no such thing as n free 
bamboo shoot." We don't sub¬ 
sidise uneconomic coal mines, 
so why should we subsidise 
uneconomic pandas? 

Ninety-nine point nine per 
cent of the species that the earth 
has ever supported are now 
extinct. These johnny-come- 
taiely species don't know they 
arc bom. We humans were a 
young species once. And there 
were no charitable trusts to 
mollycoddle us when wc were 
clobbered with ice-ages, show¬ 
ered b\ molten lava and chased 
h\ mammoths. No Sir! Wc got 
on f<ur bikes and evolved. 

So my advice to the BBC and 
the Worldwide Fund for Nature 
is ditch pandas and get into rats. 
Rats arc smart. Rats are survi¬ 
vors. All about rats on Mondav. 


Abba Eban believes his country has a crucial role in forcing Saddam Hussein to back down 

Why Arabs must look to Israel 

- ..... __,_:_.«_.— i - - v._ 1 _• _ tu. 


jargon is the name Swanwick. 
from the place in Derbyshire 
where it all started to come 
together. The crucial moment - 
people who were there can still tell 
you exactly what they were doing 
at the lime - was on September 3. 
19S7. when Cardinal Basil Hume 
dramatically announced that the 
Roman Catholics would after all 
take part. Until then it had seemed 
they might refuse to join, thwart¬ 
ing the whole exercise. 

If Christianity has much of a 
future in Britain, h can no longer 
be left to depend on the Church of 
England alone. The C of E is still 
the largest and the richest of the 
churches, and its established sta¬ 
tus gives it an anchor in English 
society which could still be valu¬ 
able. but by itselfit has not proved 
equal to ihe challenge of secu¬ 
larism. Its once easily assumed 
leadership of British Christianity 
is now having to gi ve way to some¬ 
thing more like equal partnership 
with the other heavyweights. 

The British Council ofChurchcs 
was mainly a channel through 
which the Church of England 
could relate to the Church of 
Scotland and the Free Churches, 
so the decision to wind it up was 
an admission that there is no 
longer any sense in excluding the 
Roman Catholic Church. On most 
reckonings texcept weekly church 
attendance) the Roman Catholic 
Church is second to the C of E 
within England: in Britain as a 
whole, it is clearly the predomi¬ 
nant Christian institution land 
even more so if Ireland were 
included). Yet for theological and 
historical reasons, it is bard for 
the others to come to terms with. 

Dr Carey is ideally suited to 
head the Anglican presence in this 
new arrangement. Even his loudly 
declared support for the ordina¬ 
tion of women may turn to his 
advantage, for it will protect him 
from the charge, somewhat 
debilitating to Dr Runcie’s ecu¬ 
menical efforts, that he is a secret 
Romaniser trying to fashion deals 
with Rome that would betray the 
C of E's primary beliefs. Dr Carey 
can be as warm to the Roman 
Catholic Church as he likes — and 
he is pretty warm already — 
without arousing such suspicions. 

The decade of evangelism 
started life as a decade of evangeli¬ 
sation. the preferred word in 
Roman Catholic circles, and it 
was announced by the Pope as a 
global preparation for the end of 
the millennium. He invited the 
otherchurchestojoin.andin 198$ 
the Lambeth Conference pledged 
Anglican participation. Most 
oLher churches have made a 
similar commitment, and one of 
the first tasks for the new institu¬ 
tions will be to pick up the baton 
and run with it. Which way and 
how well they run may depend on 
the relationship between the new 
Archbishop of Canterbury and the 
Roman Catholic Church. All the 
signs so far suggest that it will 
work out famously. 


D anger and opportunity of¬ 
ten go hand in hand. They 
now meet in the Gulf The 
danger is self-evident. A ruthless 
dictator is on the rampage, 
contemptuous of neighbouring 
sovereignties, regional peace and 
international order. Unless Sad¬ 
dam Hussein is checked early in 
his course, he will spread his 
devastation until the chance of 
redress is lost. 

Historic analogies are rarely 
perfect but this does not mean 
they are always irrelevant. The 
tragedy of the l930s was born of a 
deadly chain in which every 
unresisted episode brought man¬ 
kind closer to the precipice. The 
Rhineland. Ethiopia, Austria, 
Czechoslovakia, Albania and Po¬ 
land were landmarks at any of 
which a robust resistance could 
have arrested the deadly mo¬ 
mentum. There is no such thing as 
a sialic or satisfied dictatorship. 

So much for the danger. 
Opportunity arises because Sad¬ 
dam Hussein is a Hitler only in 
malicious intent, not in power. 
This is where opportunity could 
transcend and neutralize the dan¬ 
ger. A victory for international 
civility is available here with not a 
fraction of the cost incurred by 
hesitant counsels a half century 
ago. All the conditions are ripe for 
enclosing this tyrant in a water¬ 
tight quarantine affecting his econ¬ 
omy. his diplomatic relations, his 
regional status and his military 


options. 

That all the major powers have 
condemned the Iraqi aggression 
and demanded withdrawal 
illlustraies how profoundly peres¬ 
troika and the democratic revolu¬ 
tion in Eastern and Central Europe 
have widened the effective scope 
of collective action on behalf of 
international peace and security. A 
joint approach by Washington and 
Moscow, backed try all Europe, 
Egypt and Israel, without cold-war 
inhibitions, could be the central 
hope of a new Middle East It 
could be that Saddam Hussein is 
trumpeting the pride that goes 
before the falL 

To say that the Arab world is 
divided would be to flatter 
Saddam Hussein too much. Those 
led by President Mubarak, in this 
case comprising Syria, Saudi Ara¬ 
bia, Jordan and the pragmatic and 
realistic part of the Palestinian 
establishment, are the dominant 
consensus. Saddam Hussein is the 
lonely deviation. He can be con¬ 
tained and brought to heel. 

If Kuwait is left to its fete, who 
would vouch for the oil-rich Saudi 
Arabia, for the Emirates and for a 
Syria whose leader is beginning to 
demonstrate the prudence and 
restraint which led to the 1974 
Syrian-lsraeli disengagement? Can 
Jordan doubt that its integrity is 
safeguarded by Israel's deterrent 
power, not by the illusory Bagh¬ 
dad-Amman alliance? King Hus¬ 
sein should look westward across 


the narrow river for his kingdom s 
safety, not eastward toward the 
Gulf. And nothing will be lost by 
Israel making its deterrent inten¬ 
tion clear. . . 

Meanwhile, it would be grotes¬ 
quely rash to interpret the Bagh- 
dad-Kuwait situation as a reason 
- or excuse — for m a in t aining a 
deadlock in the Israeli-Palestinian 
peace process. The sane Israeli 
view is that expressed yesterday by 
Yitzhak Rabin: “I predict that 
further stalemates in our relations 
with the Palestinians in the terri¬ 
tories will impel the Arabs to look 
increasingly toward Iraq for 
inspiration... I refer to Jordan, to 
Saudi Arabia and to the Palestin¬ 
ians themselves. v ” 

Saddam's invasion of a helpless 
Kuwait has a more sensational 
sound than the laborious search 
for a PaJestinian-Israeii settle¬ 
ment Yet Iraq is not Israel main 
problem. It does not affect our 
structure, it does not impinge 
negatively on our economy or on 
our international relationships 
and it does not call for action 
beyond an increase- in vigilance 
and a serene and unprovocative 
projection of our own strength. 
That Iraq is not contiguous with 
Israel is immensely important, for 
it means that Saddam could attack 
us only by inaugurating an ex¬ 
change of missiles, which would 
expose him to untold devastation. 
The other theoretical options 
would be available only if he were 


to seek and obtain a strong base in 
Jordan or Syria. 

This would mean multiplying 
his adversaries, and fate cannot 
realistically believe that he would 
be able to avoid encountering 
Israel away from his own ground. 
Saddam has already created a 
common security interest which 
Israel shares with Egypt, Jordan, 
and even Saudi Arabia and Syria— 
indeed with all those in this region 
whose major interest is stability. 
What prevents this shared interest 
from being pot to work is the 
continuing Palestinian deadlock. 
Israel does not have the option of a 
one-subject agenda. Deterring 
Saddam is vital, but it is iioi a fuH- 
time job. Our strategic co-opera¬ 
tion agreements with America are. 
more relevant than they seemed a 
lew weeks ago when it appeared 
that perestroika and glasnost had 
made strategic calculations ob¬ 
solete, but the containment of 
Saddam must fell chiefly - on 
broader international shoulders. 

The American secretary of state, 
James Baker, should be actively 
encouraged to proceed with the 
Israel i-Palestinian-Egypti an dia¬ 
logue that he proposed some 
months ago. It is ludicrous, in the 
shadow of starkly ominous events, 
to find that dialogue obstructed by 
pilpuliStk trivialities about whe¬ 
ther authentic Palestinian leaders 
who have a home in Ramaflah and 
an office in Jerusalem may partici¬ 
pate, or only those who qualify by 


hen one 
small 
ne leads 



As the temperature nudges 100, 
Alan Franks reports on a chance 
discovery that has turned world 
weather predictions upside down 







C haos is reigning in the 
American scientific es¬ 
tablishment This is not 
the standard turbulence 
of disciplines at tvar among them¬ 
selves and with others, but the 
phenomenon which becoming ac¬ 
cepted as a governing force in 
widely diverse areas of research. 
Its sole constant is seeming ran¬ 
domness. and its consequent abil¬ 
ity to thwart projections by even 
the most credible scientific models. 

N owhere is this truer than in the 
field of meteorology, which chaos 
theory threatens'to reduce to 
fatuity through the nolion, known 
as the Butterfly Effect, that an 
insect baiting its wings and 
disturbing the air in China today 
can next month transform the 
siorm systems in New York, or 
indeed the temperature of a 
London August. If chaology is 
taken to its logical extremes, ihen 
all our predictions, ihe best and 
the worst, about global warming 
must be rendered meaningless, 
since its central tenet is that there 
is no such thing as a reliable 
prediction. 

It is. appropriately enough, in 
the business of weather forecasting 
that chaos theory has its origins. In 
his book Chaos published three 


Blue Riband 

T he increasingly fraught 
attempts to have the Blue 
Riband Trophy returned to 
Britain have received an un- 
c-.peeved boost. A close relative of 
Harold Holes, the Tory MP who in 
l g 35 donated the 42in cilt-and- 
silver trophj for the fastest cross- 
■inc of the North Atlantic, has 
supported the claim by owners of 
the catamaran ScaCat Hmcrspeed 
Great Britain. 

Since the £10 million vessel 
made the crossing in June in three 
days, seven hours and -5 minutes 
(breaking the record sc! by the 
liner United Slates in 1 °52 1 . the 
American Merchant Marine Mu¬ 
seum in New York has refused to 
hand it oxer, arguing that Hales 
intended it to go only to the 
“greyhounds” of the north At¬ 
lantic passenger trade. "The cata¬ 
maran did not carry passengers." 
says the museum's lawyer. Peter 
Clarke. "Il was just a publicity 
slum." 

Although lawyers for the Blue 
Riband trustees have ruled that 
the trophy should be h3nded over 
to Sea Containers, the company 
which owns ihe catamaran, the 
museum and United States Lines 
insist that the original trust deed 
and Hales's autobiography sup¬ 
port their cause. 

Former naval commander 
Robin Kent, a nephew of Hales 
and one of only two surviving 
relatives, disagrees. “Hoverspeed 
Great Britain has fulfilled all the 
conditions.” he says. "The mu¬ 
seum is being churiish.The trophy 
must return to Briiain." Ken!, 
who saw action during the Falk¬ 
land* war as a Sea Harrier pilot, 
believes his unde would want the 


years ago and now enjoying huge 
influence in the United States, the 
American science writer James 
Gleick tells the story of the 
dogged, if eccentric researcher 
Edward Lorenz, whose allegiances 
switched from mathematics to 
meteorology as a result of his 
experience as a weather forecaster 
for the Army Air Corps during the 
second world war. 

In the early 1960s he con¬ 
structed an elaborate “toy wea¬ 
ther" machine which would give 
out daily records of the conditions 
it was simulating. While it could 
not hope to match the real globe 
for complexity of atmospheric 
conditions, it none the less had a 
“weather” of its own. and one 
which seemed to be doing more 
than a passingly good imitation of 
the world beyond. If you could 
decipher the print-outs, you could 
deduce the pattern of the prevail¬ 
ing wind and the rotation of the 
cyclones. Whatever its deficien¬ 
cies. the device was compelling 
enough to attract a weather eye 
from his fellow meteorologists and 
graduate students. 

To begin with, the behaviour of 
the Lorenz's "weather'’ appeared 
to conform to his intuition — and 
the evidence of his computer 


trophy returned. “It would be nice 
if it could come home. He would 
like that.” 

Clarke, however, refuses to 
budge, though he adds: "If the 
QE2 were to go across and beat the 
record wc would have absolutely 
no problem whatever in turning it 
over.” How about it. Cunard? 

© Darlington residents could be 
forgiven had they taken to the 
streets on Thursday to welcome the 
first ram for weeks. On one of t he 
hottest days an record, the 
Northern Echo published the 
following forecast: "Occasional 
wintry showers. TisibiUty: go/jd 
but poor m showers. Wind: severe, 
gale (.‘ice 9. Sea state: High." ".J 
computer error, "says the paper. 


print-outs — that over a period of 
time the weather will repeat itself 
in a more or less familiar series of 
patterns. Except that, rather like 
the comparable view of history, 
these repetitions were never quite 
exact There was a pattern, cer¬ 
tainly, but there were disturbances 
too. It was, in Gleick’s words, an 
orderly disorder. 

Then, one day in 1961. wanting 
to scrutinise one particular se¬ 
quence, Lorenz decided to save 
time by picking up the program 
halfway through, rather than start¬ 
ing at the beginning. To feed the 
machine its original conditions, he 
typed the numbers from the 
previous print-ouL 

“When he returned an hour 
later," says Gleick, “he saw some¬ 
thing unexpected, something that 
planted a seed for a new science. 
This new run should exactly have 
duplicated the old. Lorenz had 
copied the numbers into the 
machine himself. The program 
had not changed. Yet as he stared 
at the new print-out. he saw his 
weather diverging so rapidly from 
the pattern of the last run that, 
within just a few months, all 
resemblance had disappeared. He 
looked at one set of numbers, then 
back at the other. He might as well 





have chosen two random weathers 
out of a haL“ 

The crux of the matter was this: 
the computer’s memory stored its 
figures to six decimal places, while 
the print-outs, to save space, gave 
them to only three. Lorenz had 
keyed in the abbreviated forms on 
the assumption that the difference 
was negligible. Yet the tiny dis¬ 
crepancies had proliferated, fed off 
themselves, and in a relatively 
short period of time had become 
momentous. 

Here was the origin, or chrysalis 
of the Butterfly Effect ■ which 
underpins the theory of chaos not 
only in meteorology but in the 
other predictive sciences. Gleick 
describes it thus: “Forsmall pieces 
of weather — and to a global 
forecaster, small can mean 
thunderstorms and blizzards — 
any prediction deteriorates rap¬ 
idly. Errors and uncertainties 
multiply, cascading upward 
through a chain of turbulent 
features, from dust devils and 
squalls up to continent-size eddies 
that only satellites can see.” This 
realisation has led to the abandon¬ 
ment of long-range weather¬ 
forecasting. 

After Lorenz, the idea that 
chaos must be a critical factor in 


be red the warning. “No!” I blurted 
out. “Your hernia operation!’* 
Habgood immediately desisted, 
perhaps saving himself a further 
trip to hospital. 


Dog eats ice 


DIARY 


Tidal wave 

T oo much fresh salmon is not 
usually a cause for com¬ 
plaint. especially from vic¬ 
tims of National Health Service 
catering, But groans of “Oh no. 
not salmon again" can be heard 
echoing through the wards of the 
Bordens General Hospital at Mel¬ 
rose after the delivery to its 
kitchen of 170 prime fish seized 
from poachers on the River 
Tweed. The hospital chef has been 
searching the recipe books for 
way-out salmon recipes — pref¬ 
erably those enabling it io be 
served looking and tasting like 
something else. 

Raymond Blanc, chef at Lc 
Manoir aux Quaire Saisons near 
Oxford, is aghast at such sacrilege. 
“Poached, very simply in a vcgl 
etable stock, is the perfect wav of 
serving salmon." he says. “And 
that would be ideal for people who 
are convalescing. Rich creamv 
sauces? Definitely not." M Blanc 
calculates that 170 fish will pro- 
v ide roughly 10 meals each for the 


hospital's 400-plus patients. 
Couldn’t they do a deal — ship the 
remaining salmon to Oxford in 
exchange for bangers and beef? 

Order of the elbow 

P ushy journalists are not 
popular with anyone, least of 
all churchmen, but the Arch¬ 
bishop of York has reason to be 
grateful to one. Researching a 
book on an outsider's view of 
British life, the American Richard 
Critchfield interviewed Dr Hah- 
good recently at Bishoplhorpc. his 
palace outside York. 

Critchfield had been warned in 
advance to go easy because 
Habgood was recovering from a 
hernia operation. Nevertheless, he 
found himself spending two hours 
at Bishoplhorpc. not least because 
Habgood insisted on showing him 
the portrait gallery of previous 
archbishops, talking animatedly 
about this one who had been 
beheaded and that one who had 
suffered untold tribulation. When 
Critchfield finally returned to his 
text in the grounds, the engine 
would not start because of a flat 
battery. 

“There was nothing to do but 
push." he says. “I went round to 
the back of the taxi, and so did the 
archbishop. Just in time l remem- 


A s temperatures continue to 
soar, dogs willing in the 
heat will be glad to hear that 
at least American ice-cream 
manufacturers have their interests 
at heart. Associated Ice Cream of 
Westerville, Ohio, has developed 
a brand of ice-cream specially for 
dogs called Frosty Paws. Available 
in a variety of flavours and three 
sizes for small, medium and large 
dogs. Frosty Paws is proving 
popular: two-thirds of American' 
dog owners occasionally give their 
pets ice-cream as a treat. 

Marketing man Frederick 
Marsh hopes to introduce a simi¬ 
lar product in Britain. “I think it’s 

you're Suck a 
fowl if ^ rifcnru| 


having been expelled from the 
West Rank . The solution, of the 
Palestinian representation pro!* 
lem should lie in normal inter¬ 
national practice, which tells us. 
that aS peoples have a right to be 
represented by emissaries of therir 
choice, and that the criterion is not 
virtue but effectiveness. 

Mr Baker's proposal for a Cairo 
dialogue is the most- innocuous 
and lenient, the safest and least 
hazardous proposal ever submit-' 
ted to Israel by any foreign power. 
It could be buiU into a community 
structure in which Israelis, Pales¬ 
tinians and Jordanians could find 
a way of-maintaining a separate 
juridical - and cultural identity 
while closely integrating in all 
other domains. What Europe can 
best offer Israel and rts neighbours 
is the example of its own Commu¬ 
nity structure. 

We are approaching an age in 
which hot a single European, East 
or West, will be living in a society 
not based on equality and consent 
Saddam's squalid manoeuvre, 
must not only be resisted by! 
righteous encirclement, it most be 
discredited by competing models: 
of national freedom, social har¬ 
mony and institutionalised re¬ 
gional co-operation. Only thus can 
we Middle Eastern nations emerge 
from deadlock and flow with the 
movement and impulse of the 
modern age. 

The : author Israeli foreign 
minister, 1966-74. 


deliberations beyond the state of 
the weather gained a broader 
acceptance. Above that chaos 
there might well appear some 
over-arching scheme, r but. the 
working- of the chaos itself had 
first to be addressed. Physiologists 
investigating the causes of sudden 
heart deaths found both order and 
chaos, as did ecologists analysing 
patterns of gypsy moth popula¬ 
tions, economists poring over, old 
stock price .data, and, in their 
various ways, mathematicians, 
chemists, physicists and biologists. 

Chaos is, of course, what you' 
make of it. Fbr the meticulous 
who “leave nothing to chance" it 
is an irritant, a ghost in the 
machine whose presence is the 
more damnable because it cannot 
even be believed in. For the 
laissez-faire, the lazy, thebtfrnbler 
and the bamboozled, itsitsiifea 
mighty sump into which;"all 
charges of shoddy reseaitfr^and 
poor methodology can be made to 
vanish. “I hear what you say. but 
you see. you weren’t reckoning 
with the Chaos Factor. - " : 


T he Americans, if goes, 
without saying, rave' 
made a virtue of chaos.;? 
They may not have wres¬ 
tled it into explicabflity. but they.' 
have imposed a son of raider on its 
academic movements. There are 
Chaos journals and Chao* Con¬ 
ferences, and costly Chaos ie-' 
search programmes for the Central.. 
Intelligence Agency and -the 
department pf energy, with spe¬ 
cial, presumably chaotic, units set 
up to handle the financing. There 
are students who make their first 
allegiance to . Chaos, and \}heir. 
secondtotbe specialism, although 
sceptics wifi argue that it has been 
ever thus. At the University of Los : 
Alamos there is now a centre for 
nonlinear studies to oversee work 
onChaos andits related problems. 

In Gleick’s vjew,20th-«ntury 
science will be remembered for 
three things: relativity, quantum 
mechanics, and Chaos*. Jh is noth¬ 
ing less than the thiiid great 
revolution in tbe physical sci- ' 
ences, and. like the two .that 
went before, it refutes Newtonian 
principles. “The simplest systems 
are now seen to create extraor¬ 
dinarily difficult problems of 
predictability ...only a. new kind 
of science could begin to cross the 
great gulf between knowledge of 
what one thing does —- one water 
molecule, one cell of heart tissue, 
one neuron -r and what millions of 
them will do." ' ' . 

I still say today is going ta be a 
scorcher. 


All we need then to com 
the picture is postmen fa 
ankle-snapping dogs by disgu 

themselves as Mr Whippy. 

• Amid the 90th birthday frii 
to the Queen Mother, the 
putana Rifles Reunion .-Is 
at ion. comprising members ti 
Indian Army’s oldest regih 
has dedicated Rajpurana ft 
News 1990 to "Queen Elide 
... Last Empress of India’'. ‘ 
title is very important to us." 

Mainr Anthnnir 








a good idea,” he says. “I would* 
suggest s variety with no colouring 

hLw? ,Uves 10 int0 a “ount 
hadth eonram.*; Marsh plans to 

twJS suggestion to Pedigree 
Petfoods. It is owned by Mars." 

0Ul * “ which WW 

a Mars ice-cream bar." 


--: . <viMg-c;mp£Tor 

week in the mess." Tonight t 
Rajputs will Be drinking' i 
former Empress. 

Blue is green 

F inally conceding tha; 
cold war is over. Lady 
Maitland, mdefatij 
champion of the nuclear dele 
is turning her gunfire from 
to Friends .of the Earth. Sh 
just launched an outfit i 
Conserve to promote the 
servative case for the env 
ment “It’s the government t 
leading tire way on feai 
IKirol, she says. “We wifi 
that the Conservatives an 
guardians of fete planet,” 

wfinSS? minisler W: 

Waldegrave and David Tri 

environment minister wifi 
ponstbility* for green issue¬ 
supporting the campaign, i 
certainly will not damage 
Olgas parliamentary ambt 
week she .ranwJJrS 

gs.rsr&'s; 

gWFatniiies for 

SSfJ* "? l disbanded 

simply going into cold stars 
just in case". -r 1 *" 3 























THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


11 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


1 Pennington Street; London El 9XN Telephone 071-782 5000 



UN’s opportunity for action over Iraq invasion 


< £’?^ ksand strategic reserves 

: w 11 ^ ® yen world more to 

be nervous about than queues at petrol pumps. 

should be kept in propcntfoiL 
countries’ economies arc 
: °° od than they were in 

- Si ?* “ U **9 ^ 1974 standards at 
• It 23 Ia ? fie al wtoch, provided there are 
no further upheavals in the Gulf; prices seem 

SteW 1 * is * sharp toSSfto 

shoX^nra™^ m bm thedamage 

vpitli5 C U K it ^t? tates> where figures released 
yesterday snowed unemployment at a two-year 
lugn, the economy was already showing signs 
of cyclical weakness verging in some states on 
recession. A S6per barrel increase in oil prices 
would, on OECD estimates, increase inflation 
oy * cent. Asa counter-measure, Japan and 
west Germany would be likely to raise interest 
rates. The United Stales has become so 
. dependent on Japanese investors to finance the 
budget deficit that the US Federal Reserve 
would then be unable to poll the economy out 
of recession by lowering American rates. 

Stagflation in the United States would mean 
bleak prospects for those who trade with h. The : 
repercussions would be felt across the Atlantic, 
particularly in Britain, where manufacturing 
exports would be affected by simultaneous 
rises in energy costs and sterling. The key - 
question is therefore whether the surge in on 
prices is temporary, or likely to hold. The 
answer, which will in part be determined by 
political reaction to the invasion of Kuwait, 
depends on the balance of supply and demand. 

The OPEC row over quotes “reflects ah' 
underlying glut, but withdrawal of 4.5 million 
barrels per day (mbd) in Iraqi and Kuwaiti oil 
production from the market would more than 
eliminate the 2.7 mbd production surplus. 
Now that it has stolen Kuwait’s capacity, Iraq’s 
interest lies in selling its newly-enhanced, 
production, albeit white forcing other Gulf 
producers at gunpoint to keep the price up by 


BLACK GOLD 


sticking rigidly to OPEC’s new quotas. That 
does not, however, mean that supplies will 
soon return to normal. Where Kuwaiti oil is 
concerned, Iraq may have difficulty in finding 
buyers because there is, to say the least, 
ambiguity about its legal title. Iraq’s own 
production of 3 mbd is already subject to an 
American import fen, and could soon be the 
object of a Nato ban and even a legally binding 
Security Council embargo. 

However, no embargo would be leak-proof 
Iraq’s o9 flows by three routes. Two pipelines 
carry 1.2 mbd from its northern Kirkuk field 
through Turkey, which is already under 
pressure to close them from the United States. 
Half as much again feeds into the Saudi 
pipeline to the Red Sea. That oil would be 
impossible to distinguish from Saudi oil; but 
were Saudia Arabia, to be bullied into passing 
off Iraq’s supply as its own, to get round an 
embargo, that, would imply compensatory cuts 
in ns own production. The rest goes by tanker, 
and would be vulnerable to naval blockade. 

- An embargo would keep oil prices at or 
above the new OPEC “floor 1 ’ of $21, but not so 
far above as seriously to damage the world 
economy. Most of the market shortfall could 
be made up by Venezuela and Nigeria. The 
world this weekend is not doomed to suffer 
another oil shock. But Saddam Hussein, by 
putting politics back into the oil market has 
still placed energy security firmly back on the 
longer term agenda. 

If demand for oil continues to rise at present 
rates, it will be up by 10 mbd within ten years. 
OPECs power will increase, because most of 
the extra supply will have to come from the 
Gulf countries: Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Kuwait 
have two-fifths of proven reserves. 

Tnvironmental and security concerns march 
hand in band. Planning for the next oil shock 
must begin now. Saddam’s aggression may 
have done the world an unintended service, 
both by awakening it to the danger of letting a 
dictator’s imperial ambitions set oil prices 
instead of the markets; and by offering a 
preview of a future unpaiatably dependent on 
the region he aims to dominate. 


A BIRTHDAY HONOURED 


The royal lady who reached her 90th 
anniversary today, and reached it in such 
splendid health and spirits, has earned many 
times over every cheer and tribute that she has 
lately received. No royal birthday is a solitary .. 
event, this one feast of alt 

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother is now. so much a part of the nation’s 
life that she might have been bom to it Yetshe 
could not have guessed, when she married the 
Duke of York in April 1923, what strange, 
chance would bring them to the throne. The 
transition was not easy. The wound of the 
Abdication took time to heal, and in a sense 
never did. She is said to have felt the pain more 
deeply than any other member of the royal 
family. 

Queen Elizabeth’s first great public test came 
onlythree years later. She and the King rose to 
' the occasion of war and lightened the nation’s 
darkest hour. Even at the worst times they were 
in London, sharing the dangers, subject to the 
same fears. This remains the foundation of the 
respect in which she is still held, half a century 
on. From then, and through the long years of 
widowhood, the affection she has inspired has 
steadily increased and shows .no sign of 
diminution. 

The bond between the Qneen Mother and 
the nation is rooted in two quite distinct 
qualities, her instinct for the place and purpose 
of the monarchy and her personal warmth. 
Modem European kings may cycle through 
their realms, but many forget that kingship in 
the day of democracy must offer an aloofness, a 
focus of distant respect and affection separate 
from the heavy brigade of politics. Monarchy 
is for those who, resigned to being governed, 
more or less relish.the thought ofbeing reigned 
over. The allure of that focus is powerful, and it 
is hardly surprising that many, weary of the 


spots and stains of politics, turn to a family free 
of them. 

The Qneen Mother knows that in constitu¬ 
tional practice she is.a mere symbol, but that 
symbols are not just decorations; they can be a 
vital carapace over amation’s life.' The french 
rid themselves of their last monarch 120 years 
ago, and have spent much time since devising 
ever more elaborate rituals with which to 
surround their otherwise convenient political 
system — as do democratic Americans. Even 
dictators such as Bokassa pathetically need to 
proclaim a “royal” quality, to present them¬ 
selves as figures above politics whom all 
history would remember. “Is it not passing 
brave to be a King, And ride in triumph 
through PersepoIisT’ 

- No such thoughts trouble the Queen Mother. 
Yet the ease and good humour with which she 
shoulders her royal position and an unceasing 
round of engagements have formed a role 
model of royal behaviour the smile, the careful 
speech, the gracious wave, the ability to betray 
no trace of controversy, no hint of humbug or 
tedium. It is this that has rendered her more 
than passing regal and made her — in the 
original sense — truly popular. 

Lytton Strachey’s account of the death of 
Queen Victoria in 1901 included a striking 
reminder of what was obvious but forgotten. 
He said that “the vast majority of her subjects 
could not remember a time when she was not 
reigning over them”. Today, the vast majority 
of Britons cannot remember a time when the 
Queen Mother was not among them. As her 
progeny have personified, and continue to 
personify, each generation of British life, so she 
is today the personification of great- 
grandmotherhood In every sense hers is a 
remarkable achievement May she have many 
more years to enjoy it. 


ENGLAND’S PLEASANT PASTURES 


The derision of the environment secretary, 
Chris Patten, in the apparently small matter of 
Donnington village in Berkshire, will be of 
significance not just for Bntisfr planmngbut 
for the fete of the whole “post-agnodtmal 
British landscape. He is being asked bya 
landowner to permit a new rettiement mopen 
country near Newbury. This request contra¬ 
dicts local and national planning principles 
which state that, other things being equal, new 
building should lake 

to existing settlements. The reason lor this 
principle is admirable: to avmd ribbon 
development despoiling ever more of Britain s 

° I The P amiment of the landowner, James 
Gladstone! is seductive, as is tot used by most 

lon^r^SS 0 for'alncul^^ 

to build houses there? Not only are they 
needed, but the profit from them wll enable 
SSmM his Stately home, Donnington 

^Gladstone goesJurther HetaMr, 
emoloved a fashionable architect, John Simp- 
f^ourcd bv conservationists for his 


is^IedS 

of 30 U houses ui ^ditton. The village 
English by woodland and a 

would he, sure ^ ble an out-and-out 

County of Berkshire. . 
credit to the * , ity 0 f modem (or post- 

5? ch ^Rritish^archJiecture, says Mr Glad- 
modern 2nthinkahfe can now safely be 
stone, that tij e U d pleasant land, he 

by England’s greet, 
ar SP e5 '. architects and its green and . 
h^builder* Of course developers 


' who in the past simply covered field upon field 
with pattern-book housing should be congratu¬ 
lated for worrying about the setting of their 
estates now. They should be encouraged to 
■ employ architects such as Mr Simpson and 
encouraged to exploit the English picturesque 
tradition. Those who own historic houses 
should also be assisted to maintain them, 
including help in making them more eco¬ 
nomic. All this is fair. 

But if ever there were a thin end of a 
dangerous wedge, this is it Like the phoney 
plea from the housing lobby for countryside 
planning rules to be relaxed to permit 
“affordable” housing for “local people”, so this 
proposal must be resisted. English country 
planning, working against ferocious dev¬ 
elopment pressures, has kept a simple integrity 
by resisting “planning gain"* as Mr Glad¬ 
stone’s blandishments are known. Planning 
gain gave London all its great monsters, mostly 
cheapjack skyscrapers in return for developer- 
financed road improvements (as at Euston, 
Victoria and Notting Hill). 

Such planning gain now threatens to gobble 
up the countryside in synthetic suburban¬ 
isation, in an uninterrupted sequence of golf 
courses, theme parks, architect-designed vil- 


around existing settlements, as there is plenty 
of land (much of it publicly owned) within 
towns, for developers and their architects to 
exercise their talents. There is no “need” to 
despoil the countryside. Where towns can be 
renewed time and again, the countryside, once 
built over, is lost to public enjoyment. The 
English landscape is under far greater pressure 
thqn that of France or Germany. It is intricate, 
fragile, vulnerable — and vulnerable above all 
to exceptions to the roles. Donnington must 
not come to pass. 


From Lady Fox 
Sir. The purpose of the United 
Nations Organisation is to main¬ 
tain international peace and sec¬ 
urity and to that end to lake effec¬ 
tive collective measures for the 
suppression of aggression. By 
unanimous vote ofits 14 members 
the Security Council in its resolu¬ 
tion of August 2 has made a de¬ 
termination that there exists a 
breach of the peace and security as 
regards the Iraqi invasion of Kuwaii. 

Article 42 of the UN Charter 
authorises the Security Council, 
should it consider economic mea¬ 
sures inadequate, to Lake such 
action by air. sea or land forces as 
may be necessary to restore inter¬ 
national peace and security. By 
article 43 all UN members under¬ 
take to make available to the 
Security Council on its call and in 
accordance with special agree¬ 
ments, armed forces, assistance 
and facilities including rights of 
passage necessary for the purpose 
of maintaining international peace 
and security. Article 47 provides 
for a military staff committee 
composed of the chiefs of staff of 
the permanent members of the 
Security Council (China, France. 
Great Britain, USA, USSR) to co¬ 
ordinate the application of armed 
force by the Security Council. 

By reason of the Cold War and 
the USSR veto no such special 
agreements have been concluded 
by UN member states and no 
collective military action by de¬ 
cision of the Security Council has 
ever been taken. Fear of loss of 
sovereign control of armed force 
has deterred states from commit¬ 
ting themselves to joint collective 
peace-keeping measures against 
territorial annexation by force. 

Yet today no civilised nation 
regards war as a valid method of 
territorial enlargement of its 
boundaries. The change in pol¬ 
itical climate is shown by Mr 
Gorbachev in his speech to the 
UN General Assembly on Decem¬ 
ber 7. 1988. indicating Soviet 
willingness to enter into special 
agreements in accordance with 
article 43. 


The UN handling of the Iraqi 
aggression is critical to its survival 
as a viable international body, is it 
not then lime for peace-abiding 
Slates to stand up for their beliefs, 
to take one limited step forward 
and combine to defeat territorial 
annexation by force? 

The long-term outcome of the 
present crisis should be the 
establishment of effective UN 
collective enforcement powers by 
the conclusion of special frame¬ 
work agreements by member 
stales. The reshaping of Nato and 
the Warsaw Pact should be taken 
into account in the drafting of 
these agreements which will re¬ 
quire constitutional ramification 
by national legislatures. 

In the short term to achieve the 
withdrawal of President Saddam 
Hussein and his Iraqi army within 
its own established boundaries (in 
parallel with economic sanctions), 
some adaptation of UN proce¬ 
dures employed in response to the 
invasion of South Korea in 1950 
should be worked out. On the 
recommendation of the Security 
Council member states should 
provide immediate national con¬ 
tingents of armed forces for a 
unified command under a des¬ 
ignated UN commander. 

The present international out¬ 
rage should be seen as a unique 
opportunity to implement the UN 
Charter’s procedures for collective 
military measures against terri¬ 
torial annexation by force and to 
demonstrate, once and for all. to 
dictators like President Saddam 
Hussein that territorial aggression 
and political aggrandisement by 
force cannot succeed. To do so will 
provide the international commu¬ 
nity (particularly the smaller 
states) with the effective law- 
enforcement power which it has 
long lacked and which minimum 
considerations of order, law and 
justice require. 

Yours faithfully. 

HAZEL FOX (Editor). 

The British Institute of Inter¬ 
national and Comparative Law, 
Charles Clore House. 

17 Russell Square. WC1. 


From Mr Jim Sillars. 

MPfor Glasgow Gown 
(Scottish National Parly) 

Sir, On July 24 I wrote to the 
Foreign Secretary urging him to 
call a meeting of the UN Security 
Council because, given ihe history 
of Saddam Hussein and the frac¬ 
tured nature of the Arab world at 
present, I saw no alternative to 
UN action if he was to be stopped 
from invading Kuwait. My views 
were ignored. 

Now Kuwait is suffering the 
barbarity of invasion by a man 
whose record of atrocity and abuse 
of human rights marks him out as 
an evil individual. 

It is in the interest of none that 
Saddam Hussein should become 
master of the Arab states in the 
Gulf and have his hands on Opec's 
main oil taps. Surely the Security 
Council will go further than its 
plaintive and weak request issued 
today that Iraq should withdraw 
and that both sides should resume 
negotiations. Surely the UK gov¬ 
ernment should push for a stron¬ 
ger line. 

Kuwait has been an exemplary 
member of the international 
community. If it is allowed to be 
devoured by an aggressor then the 
UN will suffer a humiliation of the 
same kind, and perhaps with the 
same consequences, as befell the 
League of Nations when it too 
proved inadequate in the face of 
aggression against small defence¬ 
less nations. 

What we need from the UN is 
an orchestration of world outrage 
and wrath directly solidly and 
comprehensively against Iraq, and 
backed by effective political, 
financial and economic sanctions 
until Kuwait resumes it rightful 
place as a peaceful sovereign 
nation. 

Yours etc., 

JIM SILLARS 
(Scottish National Party 
spokesman on foreign affairs). 
House of Commons. 

August 2. 


Experts reflect on errors in the Craig-Bentley case 


From Mr John Parris 
Sir. I am the only one of those 
involved in the 1952 Craig and 
Bentley case still alive, apart from 
Craig himself. I appeared for him 
at the trial. I am delighted that 
Bernard Levin (article. July 30) 
has taken an interest in the case. 

Before I too die, I would like to 
make three important points 
about the case: 

1. My client, Christopher Craig, 
aged 16, told me that after Bentley, 
aged 19, bad been arrested, the 
police sent him across the rooftop 
to try and get the gun from Craig. 
He went and when within ten feet 
of Craig, Craig threatened to shoot 
him. 

I told my client that I did not 
propose to adduce this in evidence 
since it showed him in a bad light 
but I sought his consent and 
obtained it to tell Frank Cassells. 
Bentley's defence counsel, about it 
so that he could elicit this in cross- 
examination. This I did. Frank 
. failed to make use of this, which 
clearly showed that, far from 
inciting Craig to shoot, Bentley 
tried to get the gun off him. 

2. The words “Let him have it. 
Chris” were never spoken by 
Bentley. They come from the only 
previous case of joint liability this 
century, where the words used, 
and which convicted and hanged 
the one who did not do the killing, 
were “Let him have it. he’s alone". 

3. Far from urging clemency for 
Bentley, which was the lie told by 
Lord Goddard in his old age to a 
journalist, he wrote a letter to 
Maxwell Fyfe — then known to the 
Bar as “the nearest thing to death 
in life” — in which he urged him to 
have Bentley executed. This is, no 
doubt, one of the reasons why the 
papers regarding the case are not 
to be released under the 30-year 
rule but only after 75 years. 

There are a vast number of 


other matters known to me about 
this case, including the deliberate 
deception of defence counsel by 
the police and the then Director of 
Public Prosecutions, which merit 
public attention. 

• The refusal to release the rele¬ 
vant papers until after 75 years 
indicates that the Home Office has 
certain knowledge that the execu¬ 
tion of Derek Bentley was judicial 
murder. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN PARRIS, 

PO Box 8, Carterton. Oxford. 

July 30. 

From His Honour Anthony 
Bahington 

Sir, My only connection with the 
Craig and Bentley trial is that 36 
years ago I assisted the late H. 
Montgomery; Hyde in writing a 
book about it. Bernard Levin, in 
his article on July 30, says there is 
now “more and more evidence” 
that Bentley never uttered the 
words “let him have it. Chris”, 
and further, “it is claimed that the 
bullet which killed PC Miles could 
not have fitted Craig's gun. but 
could have been fired from a 
police revolver”. 

I think we should be slow to 
condemn the trial as a miscarriage 
of justice, as Mr Levin does, until 
this new evidence is revealed and 
can be assessed. 

Craig and Bentley were tried at 
the Central Criminal Court in 
December, 1952. Lord Goddard, 
the trial judge, in his direction on 
law to the jury told them that they 
should only convict Bentley if they 
decided that he h3d known Craig 
was armed and that there had been 
a prior agreement between the two 
youths “to resist apprehension, 
even by violence, if necessary”. 

The jury had heard three police 
officers giving evidence that they 


had heard Bentley calling out to' 
Craig “let him have iu Chris” just 
before Craig opened fire with his 
revolver. They had also heard 
Bentley and Craig denying that 
these words were ever spoken. 
They were unanimously agreed, 
according to their verdict, both 
I hat Bentley had known Craig was 
armed and that the two of them 
had had an agreement to resist 
apprehension by force. 

As regards the bullet which 
killed PC Miles. Craig was armed 
with a .45 Colt revolver. When he 
was arrested all six chambers were 
filled, four with spent cartridges 
and two with mis-fired rounds. A 
forensic scientist testified that all 
the bullet-casings which were 
recovered at the scene were .45 
bullets except one, and even that 
could have been fired from Craig’s 
revolver. 

The medical evidence showed 
that Miles was killed by a bullet 
which had entered his head 
immediately above the left eye¬ 
brow. The prosecution witnesses 
spoke of Miles being shot at close 
range as he was moving towards 
Craig. Bentley in his statement 
wrote that he saw Craig firing at 
Miles, who immediately dropped 
with a lot of blood on his face. 
Craig himself said this in his 
evidence with regard to the killing, 

“I thought someone was rushing 
at me and I fired (a shot) to 
frighten him away". He claimed to 
have fired nine shots in all. 

There was no suggestion at Ihe 
trial either that a second shot had 
been heard at the moment PC 
Miles was killed or that any of the 
police who were then in the 
vicinity were armed. 

Yours failhfullv, 

ANTHONY BABINGTON, 

3 Gledhow Gardens, 

Kensington, SW5. 

August 1. 


Death of Ian Gow 

From Mr G. Lauder-Frost 
Sir. The latest IRA outrage. the 
murder of Ian Gow, MP (report. 
July 31), once again shows that the 
much-discredited Anglo-Irish 
Agreement has achieved nothing. 
Moreoever, the Government of 
the Irish republic is undoubtedly 
giving moral support to the IRA 
by maintaining its claims, written 
into the constitution, on United 
Kingdom sovereign territory, as in 
the case of Ulster. 

Is it not time that our Conser¬ 
vative Government dealt firmly 
with both the IRA by reintroduc¬ 
ing the death penalty for acts of 
terrorism, and the Irish govern¬ 
ment, by insisting that it writes out 
ofrits constitution claims on its 
neighbour’s territory and by show¬ 
ing real intent on co-operation for 
extraditions and border security. 

Yours faithfully. 

G. LAUDER-FROST (Chairman, 
Foreign Affairs Committee), 

The Monday Gub, 

4 Orlando Road. SW4. 


From Mr Andrew Bryson 
Sir, It is tempting, but misleading, 
to see the death of Ian Gow. MP. 
presented as a case of the IRA 
versus democracy (editorial. July 
31). What The Times would call 
democracy is lacking in the region 
the IRA is fighting about. 

The Catholic alienation which 
feels the IRA is directly linked to 
the 70-year-old boycott of North¬ 
ern Ireland by the Labour and 
Conservative parties. The latter 1 
has begun to dismantle its boycott, 
thanks partly to the influence of 
Ian Gow, a role which has gone 
unmentioned in the press tributes. 

But only when both parties of 
stale are fully accountable to the 
people of the province will we be 
i n a position to argue with the IR A 
about democracy, as distinct from 
self-determination. 

Yours faithfully. 

ANDREW BRYSON 
(London Secretary. Institute for 
Representative Government in 
Northern Ireland). 

16 Northampton Park. Nl. 

August 1. 


Baptism bar 

From Mrs Margot Thompson 
Sir, Mr Frank Williams (July 20) 
states that in the prayer book 
service of baptism, the god¬ 
parents are told that Christ prom¬ 
ised to grant the child the things 
for which they have prayed. This 
scriptural promise is not men¬ 
tioned in the new Alternative 
Service of baptism, and nor are a 
number of other matters — such as 
the prayer book passages requiring 
the god-parents to recite the 
Creed, and spelling out in detail 
their commitments to give the 
child a Christian education. 

Thus in the “modern” service 


the scriptural and rational basis of 
baptism is either ignored or played 
down. 

A more faithful and thoughtful 
reliance upon the Book of Com¬ 
mon Prayer for baptismal services 
would go far to remedy the 
problems which are prompting 
some groups to seek to control and 
limit the application of infant 
baptism. 

Yours faithfully. 

MARGOT THOMPSON 
(Honorary Secretary). 

The Prayer Book Society. 

St James Gariickhythe, 

Gariick Hill, EC4. 

July 26. 


Teachers 9 pay 

From Mrs Bridget Robbie 
Sir, When the Inner London 
Education Authority banded over 
to the London boroughs on March 
31 they took ihe trouble to send a 
certificate of appreciation to all 
teachers working for them. 

Oh that their appreciation had 
extended to passing on the re¬ 
quired information to our new 
employers, so that they could pay 
us our fell wages. I have been 
battling since May with the Bor¬ 
ough of Lambeth and still, after 
numerous phone calls, my fourth 
visit and many promises, am short 
of nearly £2,000. 

Yours faithfully. 

BRIDGET ROBBIE, 

The Garden Cottage, 

Downe Court, Downe, 

Nr Orpington, Kent 
July 25. 

Education funds 

From Councillor C. J. P. Vereker 
Sir. In trying to prove that not 
enough fends are being released 
from central education depart¬ 
ments to schools Mr D. Lcafe 
(July 26) highlights the dangers of 
oversimplifying statistics. 

Of the total of 7,534 people 
shown in Warwickshire's commu¬ 
nity charge circular as working in 
education, all but 475 work in 
schools and colleges (those who do 
not include the youth and careers 
services). Moreover, of the in¬ 
crease of 50 non-leaching staff. 43 
work in schools. Of the remaining 
seven, four are for government- 
funded posts. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN VEREKER (Chairman. 
Policy and Resources Committee), 
Warwickshire County Council. 
Shire Hall. Warwick. 


Restrictions on 
right to roam 

From the Chairman of the Open 
Spaces Society 

Sir, The Government, in its 
statement on common land (re¬ 
port July 27. l3ter editions) has 
broken its party's 1987 manifesto 
pledge. The promise was to “leg¬ 
islate to safeguard common land 
on the basis of the Common Land 
Forum”. Last week’s statement 
was contrary to the forum report. 

The forum recommended a 
public right to roam on ail the 1.3 
million acres of common in 
England and Wales, subject to 
com monsense regulations and by¬ 
law’s. as part of a management 
scheme overseen by an association 
comprising the owners, com¬ 
moners and local authorities. If a 
management association wanted a 
scheme outside the forum's model 
it would apply to the secretary of 
state, who would have to be 
satisfied that the peculiar circum¬ 
stances of that common justified a 
special scheme. 

But the Government has not 
endorsed the forum’s national 
right to roam. Instead it stresses 
the circumstances in which access 
may be restricted, for “conserva¬ 
tion” or “other existing uses”. 
These are euphemisms for the 
handful of grouse-moor owners 
who have vociferously fought 
access ever since the forum pro¬ 
posed ii. 

The Government warns man¬ 
agement associations to agree 
restrictions on access locally, in¬ 
stead of referring them to the 
secretary of state. The public will 
have no chance to object and we 
will lose our present customary 
access without gaining a right to 
roam. 

Paradoxically, therefore, al¬ 
though we have led the campaign 
for a neiv law for common land, 
we would fight legislation as now 
proposed by Government. If it 
cannot deliver the forum's recom¬ 
mendations. it should not tamper 
with commons legislation at all. 
but should leave it to a future, 
more sympathetic, administra¬ 
tion. 

Yours faithfully. 

RODNEY LEGG. Chairman. 

The Open Spaces Society. 

25a Bell Street, 

Henley-on-Thames. 

Oxfordshire. 

July 30. 

Cool and fresh 

From Mr E. tt'. Bishop 

Sir. Henry Stanhope (article. Julv 
2/) omits or overlooks several 
aids and adjuncts to food 
preservation in those ''primitive'* 
days, such as the gauze cover to 
prevent blue-bottles alighting on 
the meat and the outdoor meat 
safe, preferably on the north side 
of the house. 

As for butter and milk, we used 
porous day pots to keep them 
fresh and cool. .And I recall that in 
India in the 20s and even in 
Cyprus in the 50s we had a daily 
delivery of ice to replenish the ice- 
chest 

Such are the ways man endeav¬ 
ours to counter adversity. 

Yours faithfully. 

E. W. BISHOP. 

78 Bassett Green Road, 

Swaythling. 

Southampton, Hampshire. 

July 30. 

Film restoration 

From Mr Ian Martin 
Sir. Geoff Brown's article on film 
restoration (July 31) was fascinat¬ 
ing, bm I think it should have 
noted the significant contribution 
of Thames Siienis which was 
responsible for the performance of 
Napoleon in 1980. 

Spurred on by the success of 
Napoleon, Thames Television has 
sponsored the presentation of 
silent films with live orchestra 
every year since. Some of the films 
had to be restored - Ben Hur . for 
instance, the Thames Silent of 
1987. had its ttvo-sirip Techni¬ 
color sequences and original tints 
put back. But the event is restora¬ 
tion of another and very im¬ 
portant kind — it has returned the 
films to their audience. 

Yours eta, 

IAN MARTIN 

(Head of Music and Arts). 

Thames Television. 

306-316 Euston Road. NW!. 

August 1. 

Suitable dress 

From Mr Colin V. Cripps 

Sir, In many countries in which 
the climate is normally more 
benevolent than our own, the 
standard for male business dress 
excludes the wearing of a jacket If 
it is acceptable in these countries 
where other business standards 
are as demanding as our own. why 
should it not be acceptable here in 
hot weather? 

Most of us are hesitant to 
discard our jackets when attending 
a business meeting, despite the 
fact that wc do not wear them at 
home, in the car, on the train or in 
the office. What we need is some 
guidance (approval?) from such 
august bodies as the Institute of 
Directors or the CBI which will 
relieve us of this burden. 

Youre faithfully. 

COLIN V. CRIPPS. 

Wevview. Upper Guildown Road. 
Guildford. Surrey. 

August l. 


Letters to the Editor should carry 
a daytime telephone number. Thev 
may be sent to a fax number ~ 
(071) 782 5046. 


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Obituaries 


DONALD 

WORMELL 


SHEIKH FAHD al-AHMAD al-SABAH 


COURT CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE The Princess Royal, Colonel-in- 

Augusl 3: The Queen this Chid 1 . Royal Corps of Signals, 
rooming opened an Exhibition loda y visited the Army Appren- 
to mark the 90ih Birthday of * ices * College at Harrogate and 


Sheikh Fahdcd-Ahmad al-Sabah, half 
brother of the Emir of Kuwait and a 
prominent figure in world football and 
the Olympics movement was failed on 
August 2, aged 45. He was bom on 
June 10,1945. 


Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother in the Guildhall. 
Windsor. 


Her Majesty was received by 
the Mayor of the Royal Borough 
of Windsor and Maidenhead 
(Councillor Robin Austin). 

' The Hon Mary Morrison and 
Sir Kenneth Scott were in 
attendance. 


The Prince Edward this evening 
attended a production of Peace 
Child at the Shaw Theatre, 
London. 

Lieutenant Colonel Sean 
O'Dwyer was in attendance. 


was received by Her Majesty's 
Lord-Lieutenant for North 
Yorkshire (Sir Marcus Worsley, 
Bt). 

This afternoon Her Royal 
Highness visited the Royal Sig¬ 
nals Adventure Training Centre 
at Whemside and was received 
by Her Majesty's Lord-Lieuten¬ 
ant for Cumbria (Sir Charles 
Graham. Bt). 

Mrs Charles Ritchie was in 
attendance. 


Queen Elizabeth the Queen 

Mother celebrates her 90th 
birthday today. 


Marriages 


Mr J -D.P. George 
and Miss [VJ>. Crofton 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, July 28, 1990, in 
Winchester Cathedral, of Julian, 
elder son of Mr and Mrs John 
George, of Castle Eaton, 
Wiltshire, and Nicola, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Melville Crofton, 
of Winchester. The Right 
Reverend Donald Arden and 
the Dean of Winchester, the 
Very Reverend Trevor Beeson, 
officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Gillian Hughes, the 
Hon Freya Crofton, Thomasina 
Churchward, Henry Crofton. 
and George Crofton. Mr Simon 
Phillips was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon is being spent 
abroad. 


General Harry Datzell Payne, of 
New York. USA. and Mrs 
Michael Wyatt, of Dun church 
Lodge Stud, Newmarket. The 
Rev Christopher Counauld 
officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Isabel Archer, | 
Catherine Hildyard. Virginia 


THE death of Sheikh Fahd after being 
severely wounded in the fighting 
around the Dasman royal palace in 
Kuwait City which followed the Iraqi 
invasion has robbed international 
sport of one of its most influential and 
benign leaders. Without exaggeration 
Sheikh Fabd, was, behind the scenes, 
one of the half-dozen most powerful 
voices in world sport Elected to the 
International Olympic Committee in 
1981, he was president of the Olympic 
Council of Asia, being re-elected last 
year not without controversy, and was 
one of the leading figures in negotiat¬ 
ing a harmonious Olympic Games in 
Seoul, South Korea, in 1988, free of 
boycott. His dexterous and non¬ 
partisan work in both the Olympic 
movement and in football, in which 
he was president of the Kuwait 
Football Association, and. since 
April, a vice-president of FIFA, the 
international governing body, enabled 
him to exercise a healing touch on 
many provocative issues. 


marriage by her mET« 5 /n the always volatile pohticU 
attended by Isabel Archer, relationships within sport. Sheikh 
Catherine Hildyard. Virginia Fahd was a catalyst for unification 
Lancaster, Sophie Mackie, and between East and West: a middleman, 
Thomas and Henry Eastham. assisted by immense Kuwaiti wealth, 
Captain Mark Hams was best ab j e t0 harness the sporting power of 

A reception was held at The *«:*** is ironic *** *? e 
Cavalry and Guards Club, and well have played a part in ensuring the 
the honeymoon will be spent in participation in the Seoul Olympic 
the Far East. Games of Iran and Iraq, who were 

MpIVV c!w,v» then conflict. His ability to be tough 

aSd^iltnSning behind an outwardly elegant and 

The marriage took place on July subdued manner made him both a 
28. 1990, at St Marv’s Church, valuable friend and an awkward 



The sheikh rebuking his footballers during the 1982 World Cop 


Mr J.V.K. SHewicz 
and Miss A.R. Fleming 
The marriage took place on July 
28. 1990, at St Mary’s Church, 


Bucklebury. between Jarema | opponent. He survived a period of 


Silewicz. elder son of Mr and embarrassment 


financial 


M^jor MLR. Good 
and Mbs A .MX. Dated! Payne 
The marriage took place on 
Friday. August 3, at St Paul's 
Church, Knightsbridge. of 
Major Marcus Good, 15th/19th 
The King's Royal Hussars, son 
of Mr and Mrs Derek Good, of 
Middle Bean Hall. Worcester¬ 
shire. and Miss Alicia Dalzell 
Payne, daughter of Major 


Mrs Zdzislaw Silewicz, °H administration of Kuwaiti football. 


Kensington, and Alison 
Fleming, daughter of Mr and 


but lay low and re-emerged more 


Mrs James Fleming, of 
Martston, Berkshire. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Jessica Ganes, 
Catriona Fleming. Juliana 
Parker, and Beth Park. 

The reception was held at the 
home of the bride. 


0 f influential than before. He decided. 


unexpectedly, to stand for re-election 
as president of the Olympic Council 
of Asia last year, when Zhenliang He 
of China was the favoured candidate. 
The crushing of the Tiananmen 
students' rebellion last year, and its 
embarrassment to Chinese sporting 
leaders, had left Sheikh Fahd in a key 
position for negotiating the calm 


continuation of next month's Asian 
Games in Beijing. 

Sheikh Fahd is particularly remem¬ 
bered for an incident during the 1982 
World Cup fi nals in Spain, when a 
match at Valladolid between Kuwait 
and France was held up for nine 
minutes because of protests by the 
Kuwaiti players against a goal by 


France, who eventually won 4-1. The 
Kuwaitis stopped playing, when they 
heard a whistle — blown in the crowd, 
not by the referee. Sheikh Fahd, 
gesticulating, left the main tribune 
and went to the touchline: not to call 
his players off the field, as was widely 
but inaccurately, reported, but to tell 
his captain to get on with the game. 

Before he became knowaabroad for 
his sporting interests Shetth Fahd had 
taken a no less, keen involvement in 
politics, being something of a mav¬ 
erick among the numerous, more 
conventional members of. Kuwait’s 
ruling family. Privately, indeed, he 
had expressed criticism of his family 
and his idealistic, emotional nature 
led him to feet frustration, partly 
explaining why he later switched so 
eagerly to taking a high profile in 
sport, a subject of passionate interest 
to the majority of Kuwaitis. His death 
now will be keenly felt, especially 
among the younger generation of 
Kuwaitis. 

Sheikh Fahd sympathised with the 
Palestinians' cause- and fought as a 
commando officer on their side in the 
1967 Arab-Israeii wan He had to do so 
unofficially since such. active 
participation by a sheikh was unheard 
of. He was wounded and taken 
prisoner; difficult negotiations were 
required before he could be repatri¬ 
ated in 1968. 

A keen racehorse owner. Sheikh 
Fabd kept horses in training in 
England, and was a committed Anglo¬ 
phile. He had been .educated in this 
country and later had military train¬ 
ing at Mons. He joined the Kuwaiti 
army in 1962, but resigned in 1972, 
though he kept up a close relationship 
with his counties military institu¬ 
tions. In his personal fife he was noted 
■for his liberalism, being insistent, for 
instance, that his only daughter, Bibi, 
should have the same educational 
opportunities as his five sons. He had 
one wife, Fadila. ■' 1 


Professor. Donald Wormed, 
who held the Chair afLaunat 
Trinity College. DMbffrff 
years, has died aged 82. He 
was bom on January 5,1908. 




PROFESSOR NORBERT ELIAS 


Appointments 


Latest wills 


Latest appointments include: 
Mr Keith Topley to be the 
Senior Master of the Queen's 
Bench Division, to succeed Mr 
Ian Warren upon his retirement 
on September 30. 

The following to be Recorders, 
assigned to the Wales and 
Chester Circuit: 

Mr David John Hale, Mr John 
David Jenldns. QC, Mr Ian 
Patrick Morphy, Mr Gerald 
Alexander Lenin Price, Mr 
Anthony John Seys Llewellyn. 


Lady Anstey. of Southwell. Not- ; 
unghamshire, wile of Sir John 
Anstey. (eft estate valued at 
£32,750 neL 


Professor Norbert Elias, 
sociologist, died in Amsterdam 
on August I aged 93. He was 
bom on June 23,1897. 


THERE can be few precedents 


Mr Norman James LHley. of for anyone achieving inidlec- 
Amplefonh, North Yorkshire, tual celebrity as late in life as 


left estate valued at £331,798 
net. Also his wife, Susan Caro¬ 
line Lllley, who left estate 
valued at £1,086,661 net, and 
their son. Mark New lands 
Lilley. who left estate valued at 
£786,450 neL He died intestate. 
The family died in an plane 
crash in France. 


the sociologist Norbert Elias. 
The book which eventually 
made him famous. Cher den 
Process der Zivilisation (in 
English. The Civilising Pro¬ 
cess). was published obscurely 
in Switzerland in 1939 and 
sank almost without trace. 


retirement age, and the flow 
cominued right up to his 
Studien tiber die Deutschen. 
published (this time at a 
highly appropriate moment) 
only last year. 

Ail of Elias’s later work 
refers back in varying ways to 
the theory of civilising "pro¬ 
cesses, which he first depicted 
in detail as a long-term trend 
in European society since the 
Middle Ages. The first volume 
of his magnum opus was a 
study of the development of 
manners, through books of 


Royal College of 
Physicians of 
Edinburgh 


Thai was not the most pro- courtesy and civility from 
pitious moment for the Tannhauser through Erasmus 


publication of a two-volume to the mid-19th century. It 
work in German, by a Jew, on, depicts in often excruciating 



generations; but he was writ- already 57, he was appointed 
ing in the 1930s, and had a to a post at Leicester. There, 


strong sense of the fragility of with Qya Neustadt, helntilt up 
these gradually constructed a very large department of 


of all things, civilisation. AI- detail how over the centuries 
though the book was reissued more restrictive standards 


in 1969. and attracted a came to govern how people 
following among German and ate, how they blew their noses. 


This concent is made 
clearer in the second volume. 


controls. Later work explored 
many other kinds of civilisa¬ 
tion in the history of human¬ 
ity as a whole. 

Norbert Elias was born in 
Breslau, Germany, today’s 
Wroclaw, Poland. After ser¬ 
vice in the first world war, he 
studied medicine and philos¬ 
ophy there, taking his doc¬ 
torate in the latter discipline. 
His studies were interrupted 
by the great inflation, but in 
the mid-1920s he took up 
studies in sociology at Heidel¬ 
berg, frequenting Marianne 
Weber’s salon and becoming 
close friends with Kari Mann- 


sodology. Many now prom¬ 
inent British sociologisls were, 
either colleagues — for exam¬ 
ple Antony Giddens and John 
Goidthorpe — or students in 
Leicester. Elias’s influence is 
still seen at Leicester in the 
well-known work of Professor 
Eric Dunning and his team on 
modern sports and football 
hooliganism. Elias’s major in¬ 
fluence, however, has been in' 
Germany and . the 
Netherlands, where his work 
has inspired a very active and : 
diverse research tradition. 


The following have been elected 
fellows: 



Dutch sociologists, Ihe two 
volumes did not appear in 
English translation until 1978 
and 1982. What is perhaps 


how they handled defecation 
and urination and nakedness. 
It is fun to read. But the 
underlying concern is not just 


which advances a theory of heira, with whom he moved to 
state-formation in Europe — Frankfurt in 1929 as Mann- 


even more remarkable about with how these matters were 
Elias's career is that all of his moved behind the scenes of 


other books were published 
after he had reached normal 


moved behind the scenes of one another, he argued, the 
social life, but how violence, moulding of their personality 


too, had become more bidden. 


showing how rulers gradually heim's assistant 
made good their claim to a In 1933 he sought exile first 
monopoly over the legitimate in Paris then in London and 
use of violence. When people Cambridge. The Civilising 
are forced to live at peace with Process was largely written in 
one another, he argued, the England. Elias eked out an 
moulding of their personality existence on the fringes of 
also changes gradually over academic life until 1954 when. 


European sociologists gath¬ 
ered in Amsterdam to honour. 
Elias on his 90th birthday, 
when Queen Beatrix conferred 
on him the Insignia of a ; 
Commander of the Order of 
Orange-Nassau. West Ger- j 
many awarded, him the 
Grosskreuz der Bundes- j 
verdienstordens. Elias never I 
married. - .] 


AFTER spells of teaching at 
Cambridge as a. Fellow of St 
• John's from 1933 to' 1936 and 
at University College.. Swan¬ 
sea, Donald Wormefr won a 
fellowship at Trinity Colleger, 
Dublin in 1939.' Fellowships 
there 'in-those days were by 
open competition and. can- ^ 
didates had to deliver a public * 
lecture in front of the college 
board. He chose to speak on 
Homer and, by a stroke of 
fortune; he was able to refer to 
the very relevant discovery 
tire previous day of Linear B 
tablets at Pyles, which, as he 
was later to recall, be read 
about in The. Times as. be 
: stepped off the steam packet ax 
Dun Laogfaafre. h was because 
of this, he daimed. that the 
board ‘^ihougbthe was on the 
ball”. - 

WonnelPs promise was 
quickly rewarded wijb 'thc 
chair of Latin in*1942, and he 
then remained in Dublin, 
apart from service in the Air 
Ministry and the Foreign Of¬ 
fice during the second world 
war, for tire rest of his career. 

A* Trinity he formed part, 
with the late H. W. Parke and 
W. B. Stanford, 'of'a for¬ 
midable triumvirate of u 
classics professors. - p 

Public Ohuor from 1952 to 
1969, he was increasingly 
involved with, college admin- 
istratioiL- culminating in the 
vice provo5tririp> during J973- 
4. Trinity’s smooth transition 
from its isolationist 'position 
'in the pro- and immediately 
post-war years to the main¬ 
stream role , in Irish intefleo 
tual life was due in no smaH 
part to his diplomatic skips 
and wise judgmental a time of 
rapid change for the college. 

The administrative kradin- 
evitaMy lessened time for 
research, bat he wrote - on 
Lucretius, Ovid mid Virgil, 
and collaborated wiih H. W. 
Parke .in TheDefpfucOrade 
(two vote 1956), th^tandard ' A 
work on its subject. Jta retire- * 
merit he completed an edition 
ofOvid’s Fasti(W7%) with the 
help ,of his pupil Edward 
Courtney. 

Donald WannelFs early 
career had been, spent in 
England. Educated at the 
Perse School, Cambridge, be 
then won a scholarship to St 
John’s College, His command 
of Greek and Latin, and his 
sensitive appreciation of 
classical literature, matured 
rapidly and he held the Sandys 
studentship-in l93fr.He,chosC 
to widen his experience in the 
United States^ no common 
move for dassitists ra the 
1930s but typical ;iof the 
cosmopolitanism be .wa* to 
show throughout his life. ;He A 
also did research in Munich 
before the second world war. 

WcrnneH was a quiet and 
dignified, .man, Of enormous 
learning leavened by a light 
touch and a ready wit. He had 
a great, zest for life and an 
infectious sense of furuHe is 
survived by his wife, Daphne, 
his devoted partner for almost 
50 years, and by three sons 
and one daughter. 


i-’'-;/ '“ar-sJ ■* 
f"‘ r . ’ r r 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


Church services tomorrow ^ versaries 


Mr RA. Freeman 
and Miss S.E. Hamilton 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard Andrew, youn¬ 
ger son of the late Mr Harold 
Freeman and of Mrs Freeman, 
of Piddinghoe, Sussex, and 
Susanna Eve, eldest daughter of 
Sir Richard and Lady Hamilton, 
of Walton, Warwick. 


Eighth Sunday 
after Trinity 


voices fBvTd). Adomniustc (Hand! L The fDcringJ, O salniaris haslia (Franck), Fr 


Rev W JtJSiTT. 


N Kavanagh: 6.15 E& ft. 


ALL HALLOWS BY THE TOWER: 11S ST MARYLEBONE, Maryiebone Road, 


Mr C.M.D. Ross-Roberts 
and Miss L.A. Johnson 
The engagement is announced | 
between Christopher, only son . 
of Mr and Mrs Ivor Ross- 
Roberts. of Eaton Socon. 
Cambridgeshire, and Lisa, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Peter 
Johnson, of Les Buttes, St John, 
Jersey. 


C&nterbury Cathedral: S HC: 
9.30 M; 11 S Euch. St Oswald 
Service (Wegener). View me 
Lord (Lloyd). The Rev Dr C A 
Lewis; 12.30. 9lh/12lh Lancers 
Memorial Service: I Queen's 
Regimental Association Service 
of Remembrance, The Rev G 
Glew, 3.15 E. Responses 
(Moore). Stanford In B flat. 
Zadok the Priest (Handel); 6.30 
Sermon & Compline, The Rev 
N Baidock. 


Euch. Canon P Delaney. 

ALL SAINTS, Margaret Sum. WL g, 
5.15 LM: If HM. Missa Simile ea 


Wl: 8 HCi 11 S Euch. Man (Merbedoe), 
Dr T Mania; 6.30 Mining of Healing. 
The Rev D Lawson. 


rcpium (Victoria). Vigjfcue (Byrd), The ST MARY-LE-STRAND (WRNS 
Rev C A Jones: 6 E & B. Thc Second Church), Suand WC£ 11 S Communion, 
Service (Gibbons), I saw her beautiful as a Thc Rev O Clarke. 


do** iWiliam. The Rev p McCreary. 
ALL SOULS. Langtuun Place. Wl: tl 
Preb R Boms; 6.30 The Rev Dr J Stoll. 


ST MATTHEW’S. Great PfcuxSt, 5WI:8 
HC: iOSEuch. Mass (Murray). The Rev 
M Hayes; 630 LM. 


CHELSEA OLD CHURCH. Old Church ST MICHAEL’S, Chester Souare. SWl; 
Sitccl SW3: S HC; II Parish Commit- 8.15 HC; II MP, The Rev NTayloq 7 ES 
m.».PrebCELThomsaw.6E.Preface &HC. 


ST PAUL'S, Onslow 


CHRIST CHURCH CHELSEA, SW3:8 Morning Service. Mr J 


HC; 11 S Euch. The Rev S AcUnd. 
GROSV’ENOR CHAPEL South Aodley 
Slrrec 11 S Euch. Fr D Campbell. 

HOLY TRINITY. Brampton Road, 


SW7: ](U0 


Flight Lieutenant RAH. Scott 
and Dr M. Gupta 
The engagement is announced . 
between Robert Alastair Howie, 
son of Mr and Mrs J. A. Scott, of 
Newington. Edinburgh, and l 
Minakshi. daughter of Dr and , 
Mrs K,C. Gupta, of Highbury, 
London. i 


Dr N.P.M. Sacks 
and Dr AJ. Volger 
The engagement is announced i 
between Nigel Philip Michael, I 
son of Mrs M. Sacks, of 
Melbourne, Australia, and Dr 
R.H.B. Sacks, of Binegurra, 
Australia, and Annette 
Jacqueline, elder daughter of Dr 
and Mrs H.C. Volger. of 
Sittingboume. KenL 


York Minster 8. S.45 HC: 10 S 
Euch. O taste and see (Neswick), 
Missa Resunreclionis (Han¬ 
cock). Canon R Mayland; 11.30 
M, Responses (Shephard). 
Sowerby in D & C. There is a 
stream (Hallock); 4 E. Glouces¬ 
ter Service (Howells). Lord thou 
hast been our Tefuge (Bairstow). 
The Very Rev J Southgate. 

St Paul’s Cathedral: 8 HC; 10.30 
M. Responses (Rose). Jubilate 
(Travers). Surasion in G. The 
Rev C Hill: I1.3Q HC. Schubert 
in C To thee O Lord 
(Rachmaninoff); 3.15 E. Wood 
in F. Hail gladdening Light 
(Wood). The Right Rev j 
Brown. 


ST PAUL’S. Wilton Place.SWl: 8,9 HQ 
11 S Euch. The Rev C OouruukL 
ST PETER'S. Eaton Square. 5WI: 8.15 
HC, 10 Family Mass II SM. O Qoam 


SW7:11 HC. Prcb I T C 0 CdlmK 6 JO Gioriosura (Vtooiia). The Rev D Smith. 


ES. The Rev N K Lee. 


ST STEPHEN'S, Gloucester Road. SW7: 


HOLY TRINITY. Prince Consort Road. 8.9 LM; 11 SM, Mien Simile est regaum 
SWJ: 8J0 HC; II HC, the Bishop of (Lohol. Simile e*l tegmnn (Guerrero). 
Fulham. Gloria PStni (Tallis), Father CCNvat; 6 E 

AB. Father J Town. 


Fulham. 

HOLY TRINITY. Sloane Street SWl: 
8.30.12.10 HC; 10.30S Euch, The Rev K 
L Yates. 

st Bartholomew the great. 


ST VEDAST, Foster Uae, ECi I] SM, 
The Rector. 

THE ANNUNCIATION, Bryanson 


Smiihfiefd. ECI:9HC. II HCJLBaptism. Street Wl: II SM, Missa Octo vocum 
The Rector. 6 JO E. The Rector. (Kas&ler), O nata Inxdc lumiae (Tallis); 6 

ST BRIDE'S. Fleet Street EC4: II M & LM&B. 

Euch. Second Service (Gibbons). Short - 

c£difWST COLUMBA*SCHURCH OFSCOT- 
ISmith). £ Tho .1 will Shim LAND. PomSmetSWI: II Tte.RevJH 


TODAY: Vice-Admiral _ Sir 
Patrick Bayly. 76; Mr David 
Bedford, composer, 53; Mr Wil¬ 
liam Cooper, novelist, 80; Dr 
John Cunningham, MP, 51; Sir 
Rustam Feroze, obstetrician 
and gynaecologist, 70; Professor 

H.L. Freeman, psychiatrist, ®i; 
Sir George- Godbcr, former 
chairman. Health Education 
Council, 82; Air Marshal Sir 
Victor Groom, 92. 

Miss Georgina Hale, actress, 
47; General Sir. Reginald 
Hewetson, 82; Sir Harold n 
Hobson, drama critic, 86; Mr 
Martin Jarvis, actor, 49; Mrs 
Rachel Jones, former chairman. 
Broadcasting Council for Wales, 
82; Mr David Lange, CH, 
former Prime Minister of New 
Zeal and, 48; Mr Simon Preston, 
organist 52; Mr John Spalding, 
former chief executive, Halifax 
BuSding Society, 66; Mr Peter 
Squires, rugby player, 39; Sir 
Rodney Swiss, dentist, 86. 


iSmithi. tVc*lc> in E.Thou will keep him 
iWejIoi. The Rev W Boulton. 


Mdudoc; 6 JO The Rev W A Cairns. 


ST CUTHBERTS. Philbeach Gardens CRO^roURTCHURCHOFSOOT- 


SWS: 10 HC: 11 S Eudt Gibbons in F. 
The Rev J Vine. 


LAND. Coveni Garden, WCi 11.15, 
6 JO The Rev A G Bowie 1120 HC. 


ST GEORGE’S. Bloomsbury. WCIr 10 ASSUACPTrON, Warwick Street 


Eueh.FrM Day-6.30 EP. 

ST GEORGE’S. Hanover Square. Wl; 


Wl: 11 Mua O 
(Viuoha), Alma t 


Mr D.R. Urea 
and Dr E.F. Kelly 
The engagement is announced 
between David, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs Michael Urcn. or 
Temerden. Kent, and Elizabeth, 
only daughter of foe late Mr and 
Mrs Robert Fox. 


Westminster Abbey: 8 HC; 10 
M. Responses (Beanie). Jubilate 
Deo (Britten). Lift up your 
heads (Mathias). Sister H Mar- 
key; 11.15 Abbey Euch. Missa 
Brevis (Palestrina), Tanium 
ergo (Nicholson), Canon A Har¬ 
vey; 3 £, Responses (Piccolo), St 
Paul's Service (Howells), Prayer 
of St Francis fCabena), Canon A 
Harvey. 5.45 Organ Duct Re¬ 
cital: 6.30 ES. Canon A Harvev. 


8.30 HC: 11 5 Eucksiwrt Sorioe 

(Taih5).tf%e t$vc me (Tallis), The Rector. FARM STREET, Wl: 11 LM. 


ST GILES-IN-THE-FIELDS. St Giles 


High St WC2:8.12.7- ■ 5 HC: 11 MP.The 5W7: 7. 8.9. tO. 11 Mass. CoDorcda Mass 


Rev p j GaUtwray. 6J0 EP. The Rev P j IMozari). immutet Aueehs (ftJesmjia). 
Gallowav. J2J0, 430, 7; 3 V * B, Beaethc n a 

ST JAMES'S Piccadilly. Wl:8.30HC: 11 BreY “ Ave N 

S Euch; EP l“8*r). 

CTMMES-S.^G^xkns.WaSHC; KiS^SL? 1 B 


(Mozart). Immitici Aneefais (Mamna). 
I2J0. ATO, 7; 3 V*B. Bcnedicna 
Dominus (Palestrina). 

ST ETHELDREDA-S. Ely Place: II SM, 
Missa Brevis (Berkeley), Ave Maria 
(El8*r). 

OUR LADY OF VICTORIES. Katriag- 


of Healing. The Rev B Neman. 


gkmosum est 


HC; lu Parnh Euch with Children's ^ 


Southwark Cathedral: 9 HC; 11 
Huch, The Provost; 3 E. 
Westminster Cathedral: 7. 8. 9. 

10.30 SM. 12, 5.30. 7; 2.30 
Organ Recital: 3.30 V & B. 

St George’s Cathedral. South¬ 
wark: 8. l0 (Children's). 6 LM; 

11.30 HM. 


6J ° EVm0& AMERICAN CHURCH IN LONDON, 
ST JOHN THE BAPTIST. Hollaod Rd. I^™"£ ourt Rd. Wl: II The Rev 


P aefay. consonant ptiyaaanjsM 
beau or um. AminHosMUL Kuwait: 
L C-L M Ho-Chlu. consultant 


The following have been elected 
fellows of the College (Under 
Laws Cap 11,9): 


MMiancun. Queen EUzMwtfi Kos- 
Mtal. Hone Kong; C ZanttHuta&. 
airecmr «r invasive cansiotoov dftwt- 


nrem. Nicosia CencrtoH^MLaj. 
cypna: S J wait, sealer weturer. 
department of environmental ana 
occupational mwucute. university of 
AOertfeen; J M Connor, professor of 
n»(di«u vbwUcs and director of toe 
WM Of ScotJena regional genetics 
service. Strathclyde- 
T S Sinclair, consultant physician 
and . UMroenieroiogiai. Aberdeen 
Royal Infirmary: L A Kay. consultant 
hawnAtntogist. nt»a| tnUrntary. 
summand: C Devatoasnn. coraulunt 
ncurotogix in emirate nospuab, S|naa- 
borc D m MdwU. oon au t tfliu ndK^ 


W A WJ*"- s M 

Karachi. Pakistan; M v Khun. 
Cotleve or Phyncu m and Surgeons or 
^uuan. Karachi: F Elani. College Of 


Mr D.W. Wells 
and Miss EX. Clasper 
The engagement is announced 
between David, son of Mr and 
Mrs Gordon Wells.of Newbury, 
Berkshire, and Emma, daughter 
oFMr and Mrs Harry Clasper, of 
St- Germain-En-Laye, France, 
and Datcheu Berkshire. 


Greek Orthodox Cathedral of 
the Divine Wisdom. Moscow 
Rd, W2: 9.30 M: ]i Divine 
Utuigy. 


" ■ ■ - ■ ■■ ■ in*, ortr 1 nuiiduu i\u, t aiiUm 

V.,4: HUM; n SM, FrG BnctaU6 V St gff ^ ^ 

0 hmJUE & 3 VaSla11 R4 HINDE^REET METHODIST 
ST JOHNTS WOOD CHURCH. NWS: 8 fBURCH. Wl; H TbeRev L Griffilhs: 
HC:9.30 Pamh Communmn; 11S Euch, « R ^wjL 

The Rev A WalVcf KENSINGTON TEMPLE, (Chariy. 

ST LUKES. Chelsea, SW3:8.12.IS HC; 

ia30 S Euch. RvkJ in four voices. Attonsm. 23ft Bowl Ser- 

Junorom Mimae [Byttl), The Rev M Lewis; 6J0, Hraling Servjcc, 

ft*** « 30 E, O naia lux (TaUi^.Tbe 


Rev M Buicheis. 
ST MARK’S. Re 


115 Part Rd, NWI: 8 


KENSINGTON URC, ABen Street. W& 
11 . 6.30 The Rev PLovein. 


TOMORROW: Professor Ndl 
Armstrong, first man on the 
moon, 60; the Right Rev A.H, 
AttwelL former Bishop of Sodfor 
and Man, 70; Mr Billy Bingham 
football manager, 59; Professor 
Sir Michael Drury, former presi¬ 
dent. Royal College of General 
Practitioners, 64; Mtyor-Gen- 
eral W.H. Hargreaves, phy¬ 
sician, 82; Miss Jacquetta 
Hawkes. archaeologist 80; Miss 
Joan Hickson, actress, 84; Mr 
Alan Howard, actor, S3. 

P«er Inge, 55; Sir 
Michael Kerry, QC, former 
Procurator General and Trea¬ 
sury Solicitor. 67; Mr Ben 
Mdlichip, chairman. Football 
Association. 76; Mr Rodney 
Jattisscm, yatchsman, 47; Mr 
K.P. Prarson, headmaster, 
H«ngt s School, Edin- 
bur^h, 49; Sir Eric Pouniain, 
chairman. Tarmac, 57; profes- 

ESrJflirBfis- 

n 


Today 

BIRTHS; John Tradescant, gar¬ 
dener. Meopham, Kent, 1608; 
Edward Irving, founder of the 
' Catholic Apostolic Church. 
Dumfries. 1792; Forty Bysshe 
Shefly. field -Place, Horsham, 
Sussex. 1792; WJl Hudson, 
writer and naturalist, near Bue¬ 
nos Aires, 1841; Knut Hamsun, 
novelist and poet. Nobel laure¬ 
ate 1920, Lam. Norway; 1859; 
Sir Harry Lauder, music hall 
. entertainer, Edinburgh, 1870. 
DEATHS: Simon-de Momford, 
Earl of Leicester, tilled at the 
battle of Evesham, 1265; Wil- 
hatn Cecil, Baron Burgh lev, 
statesman, London, 1598; John 
Bacon, sculptor, London, 1799; 
Hans Christian Andersen, 
Copenhagen, 1875; Baron Carl 
Auer von Webbach, chemist 
and physcist, Treibach, Austria, 
1929; Rodney (“Gypsy") SmiX 
«w»ngelist, at sea, 1947;-Roy 
Thomson, 1st Baron "Thomson 
1976 1, newspaper Proprietor, 


Tomorrow 

B T RTHS; John Wrottesley. 2nd 

PaMant, short story writer. 
MiromesniL France. 1850; Con¬ 
rad Aiken, novelist and docl 
S j'afiaah, Georgia, 1889; Har- 
ow Hott, prone minister of 
Attflraha 1966-67, Sydn^f 

DEATHS: James Gibbs, arehi- 
Broderick 

nrim^ But of GtiildfonL 
prime minister I770-8r 

“drairal of the fleet. 

thor of ?Sl Cb ^*3** co-aa- 
(1848) T^ urusl Manifesto 

U848), London, 1895 ; 

1^- London, 

ntinister JT 

MOTroe, Los Angeles. lOfi**- 

^gard Burton, actor, GcnS^ 


6^.:;/.;- ■'V*- 


’ C T- 






a - '- ,w 


~ j> ^ .‘.TW 

■ -I" *' 




* 


HC; 10 Familv Smnunion; U S Euch. REGENT SQUARE PRESBYTERIAN 


Sy ni-. Royal 

SSSSWara or lrcUnd: P s Klncakl- 
ggjU?.- P MW t unl jt. Royal Melbourne 
ffiShfc Aumiia: a s wuuaim. 


mnoana: h s wuuams. 

S&!& H mbi iii a 


Tomorrow’s royal 
engagement 


Russian Orthodox Cathedral of 
the Dormition of the Mother of 
God. Ennismore Gdns. 5W'7: 
10.30 Divine Liturgy. 

Serbian Orthodox Cathedral or 
St Sawa. Lancaster Rd. Wi; 
10.30 Divine Liturgy. 


(Mcrbeckei. -riit R e v J Humble. 


URC, Tavistodt Place, WCl: 11 Mn p 


ST MARGARETS. Wcsuniusier. SWl: __ _ 

ll SEucfa, MvfcaDominral Rubbra j. We SALVATION ARMY (Regent HaDK 


aaii (or ih> lovmg kindness fMcKicL Oxford Si Wl: 11. 6J0 M^jorA MrsC 
Locus isie (Bruckncrt. The Dean. Hum; 3 Music 

ST MARTIN-1 N THE-RELDS. WCl 8, ST JOH0TS WOOD URC NW& 11 The 
IZ30. 7.30 HC. 9.4< Euch. Canon W RcvU Da lies. 

Ndungams 11 JO Visitors’ Sen icc. Precss WESLEYS CHAPEL, City Road. EC2: 
iRcspoiwes (Tomkins). O sin* joyfully 11 Morning Senact wiih HC The Rev Dr 
\BnMsml. Thc \ ‘car, L-15 Chinese Sen ice GE Bamn, The Rev J E Richanbon. 


Service dinner 


The Nudear Test Ban Treatv 

^^d^Britam,USA r SS 


Dw»e^LS3«,rs jISsi. iS 

asm 


M S F^oootu, Kjjachj. paloalSsA 
vU HOWUU. Karachi: n b Betmert. 


“j* "raw*- 

pvunca, vwveraUy of jurenmen. 


The Prince of Wales will visit 
the Prince of Wales’s Summer 
School in Civil Architecture at 
Magdalen College, Oxford, at 


GUARDS CHAPEL. Weffinjtan Bar¬ 
racks. SWl: 11 HC. Grail on cmnoque 
(VinonaL Wood in C minor. Lei all 
mortal flesh keep silence (Bairsuren. The 
Rev s P PaneUe. The Grenadier Guards. 
ST CLEMENT DANES (RaF Chcrch) 
WC£ 9 HCi 11 Euch. Mass for four 


H,. 5 A, WESTMINSTER CENTRAL HAa 

asa ****>= 1 >■ 6jft "■o 


nuWiBgrvK, • „„ „ WESTMINSTER CHAPEL BuddsK- 

^5S>\‘S?SiS3£:’ l ll?:S «■ <u» ^ B-E 

K. The Rev 6.30 E, The Vicar. tvr*rriifTTJTTTfi l urnnni r ci u i l i- i . 

5TMARV3, BOurucSirm.SWl ; 9, P.4S, 52 ISSSX 

« LM: II HM. Gaudem in reels La 


Em«x Army Cadet Force 
2®*®“* Boddye, County 
j^mmandam, and OBkxdiof 

cSa^pIsr 18 ..^' 

sa. I sjs- 

*P 0 ty oommandanL presided' 

®ndtire principal guests were 

*** c *P taia 


Wax Chandlers’ 

Company 

TTi» _. 


■'SriS'awSg; 

Upper Wav5* N ‘ P * 


• .- r-fi '■ 

POWELL * Oh 

... 

' ■»: J 
;i-f janenart' 
■.mr 

RttEV - OP 
;• ’ASMW ^ 

.1 --CT.. JO*** u 

poor .w.!*: 
Lrc’l' ■ 
TDHIMi 

v fNu« 

v.-< W 

saivhncv • 

Itii * 


TOrti* - On *n*M 

C/fi» r’nt r rf 

watts*-Cn-^rt 1 

„ aau^ir* 
xer Minm*. 


BO» - 

nuo:iM 2reL 
D: ! 

Al’.nc CiTTT 


mLWLTnrai 

ni96n*.-n. 


BAILEY - Or. A je 
MAUN*' fL- - 
d Ar.’tr as: + • : 
Fi>nuunea 
her Dc<v 
n vann w : 
lunrrjtL 
bul flrtftBfW* 
Arthritis 
C^unrti. 4; ■ 
•..-•noon wc; v 
Tr# lh .r. 
FuunCUWn. i- 

F;j*e Itr.-er* 


CAMEKON - On 

v.ic** .• 
T or-rxsr-*. rx 
Dra: 

•Cdnar.- anfi 
Eawina - - 


DALTON - 

joJin tsrtx... 
hu«*Uiio re v 

• tV*»lMjOe 

on iwsl awv 

a uoos on s 
Ciuunnt: t ■ 
Soo*. o: i 
ar>d?£rt. Qu:-* 


FAUtCMDt - 

I«0 oner - 
*■ 

Fur»;«i 

Mamas. ~ 

7 \ if* »:r*, ■ t, - 

rtll.liWM fiv l 

!>v 

in .ii-is a fcV 
TrtMWf? 
Aurm.-*!wa-xre 
Av-ur \ 


AUGUS1 




A shart-JL 
'trike in 1 
.tpneea t.i 
pt*ot li'hry 


UWH.t Jlf ! 


■*Tfck«L 


Apparent] 

•’'trcew * 








































































































































































ANNOUNCEMENTS & PERSONAL 


-TTwtp in uie by the 
grte Ezra rrad the Law lq 
O wn from .dawn to nooiT 

-BUS “* 

- NOwniah * ; 3 G3WB. 


AW ttJW WJi. - On August i« 

1 JL5S“^ Mj “ p niuy HosduIl 
-Camorwse. l0 hobM^S 
5 ««W»J Md AMuHah^S 
daugnie r. Anayah Ayisha. f- 

Wmw aster for i££ 

SSSSS,. ShOTra - « 


Mansoor. Shemnui t^uJS- 8 M- KtrfcjairKic. 3 

Mpoatyah, "*“ ■ j jL*™? . Court. Locfcswe. 

«M--OnAu9uaand i«n .^"“"CcasPW & 

(n*e e«usi ani "SJLvOn August 2nd. 

. Clive. two sons. Cram tC .. j^fobrtb Graham, she of the 


t»a a" I!h toSTwiSlr ««? - On August 2nd. 
House. New AntwuT suddenly but peacefully, 

Dumfries. c£T Hughes! rSS^ a ' <* Aklsvronh, 

Oilites M.C.O.L. ilometiv ChNIeaham. much loved 

K O 8.B."ft& JS55 l 5S ot Martin. mother of 

Christina aMaShfw Oirtstahel and Rosalind and 

andl^«SS4.&L ??!r Cranny of BecB. T«sa and 

s> ^22 l.S 52! iamUy ,unwaJ 

■ on Tuesday. Augurtra^fo ®‘ Akhworth. August 10 th at 

m. rSwuSiteJ 2 pm. Flowers to Norman 

NewAbbBraiSihSSi Trottman Hughes. 

[nends raspecUvelJ^iiSl ^^^ e0ch ‘ ,rt: tf** 511 

to attend. Family {lowers 6 ° 388 ' 

but donations If WUUMIBOW - On July 3is L 
“S“*2*0 MlHe Curie Fund after a long woes*. Bunty 


STUDENT 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 


HAPFY Anrinnsy Mum *• 
Dad. Hope ter many mere hap- 
_BV y«jrv pmi. 


HOVSE for sair CokMMer tCaano 
3 bedroom detached. »m par 
den. £80,000 Tel: 0806*2399 
ITALIA VO ptolen. roagfc Photo. 
video* of Italy. Ctannuu. 
Mourn) wanted 0274 480463 


SERVICES 


FOR SALE 


MM FISHER MTMBUCTKMs j LMITE0 supply of old york Slone 


HMD ctass cueninr. 45/4$ 
Cham Farm Hi. kwi 071 26? 
6066. w/e oat- gap (hoi. 
Men 4065 eso in demand. 

WHEN In London roil a v law. 

tv by day. wiwK. rnanui. Ouick 

delivery Top TV 07 1 7204469 


NANNY TIMES 


. Ctlve. two sons. Crthgo^S 

"fd Liam Joihua. ThanK 
«affat Kings CoW™ 
a^&wwatws Hosotui ' 
lOOIWAN - On August lw 
«p Anne and cnvV * 
datRfiWr.-Ceorguia. a agn- 

JS^ anarrMl ^S^ 

“WWW’ On July soui at the 
UridOWtog. London. u> 

SJSSS.““ . K,a,ar0 - • 

On August 2nd. at SI 

. ■ Ctieunsfoni. to 

■ w nSK? e tn 7 and 

a daughter, Sarah 

^Lowse. 9 sfeler far Joanna 


SMnL peacefully 
» King Edward VR HwpiJaL 
Dearly roerfched 
Aubrey. 

“BWKerLaura. sister Anne. 
DhDttwr>bvlaw Terence and 

' P?.r!2L r ' teces »«*ews. 
lunwal Dmate. Memorial 
Venice to be announced 

KJWJAU. -'On July 30th 

iwt in Vancouver B.C, 

ESS' 1 tn & C 00 ***) *» 

peace.in the love of her 
family Nkk. Saran. Simon. 
Ntauaes and seven 
grandchildren. ™ 


J Tt»« ^T^rgood fnond and 

sartna.ns* 

^Jemma and Zoe. Ud.. Alpine Eutipment 

9^ jQlv SBU ' 5P TOa,t3 ^- Funeral Service 

^“Wiia. lo 2L_6°““* Green 

^*™a (nee Rufleri and CrenraJortum (East Chanel} 

son - Cameron °"J*«lnesday August 8th 

Patnot Stuart, a brother for . 1 ®f° tL E ' 4e **"■ Enquiries 

Angus. toLeverton & Sons 071-387 

- On August 2nd. in* 0 now ers please, do- 

Nkola m*e ScKuuue) and • 22^22. 111 Ueu lo 81 Joseph's 
Julian, a daughter, at The ffig* 0 *- Mare Street. ■ 

Pontand Hospital, a steier Hartaiey. London E8 «SA. 


(Margareti. of Cooham. 
Surrey. Dearty loved wife of 
the [ale Eric. Sadly missed 
mother of Undy and Mandy 
and grandmother of David 
and Andrew. Family flowers 
only, but donations ir desired 
to The Asthma Campaign 
which with all enquiries c/o 
James & Thomas Lid. F/D. 
Mill Rd_ Cotoham KTU3AL. 

WTUJE On August 3rd 
1990. at Chacombe House 
Nursing Home. Dorolhy. in 
her 99th year.’ Funeral 
Service on Wednesday 
August 8th M 3.30 pm at 
Oakley Wood Crematorium. , 
war - Wellesbaume. 

Warwickshire. Flowers 
Please lo Trtnder Funeral 
Service. 122 Middleton 
Road. Banbury. Oxen. 




. from Aftoniem DtpsomaniaBi 

KAREN, greetmgs from Wales. 
Send me (horotuie DUXUXD. 
Love always 8 M _ 


vtdual to hrto m nunaolng ! 
house hold M 2 boys. 2 3 6 its I 
cv/uury romr Hayer 468 I 
sidle RfL Prtncrlon M. USA 


LAW und er gr a d seefcs Summer | WANTED 1 

vac aswnmenl. Please phone I _ ... 1 

ROh Macron . 0788 622468 ^ —— 

MANY TMJUOU St Jude and SI "SSf?'SSf'iZFUS* 


Anthony for prayers answered 
C.D. 


mill 


rural, lade and tel 071 622 

8079. 


MAKEFMCE - On August IsL 
erewctL - On August 3rd. at peaceiiiuy after long years of 


Kwbarn GeneraL lo Vtctona m health. Sterne, of Steep 
and M innow, a son. Toby Acre. Wraxsdi. Devoted 
Prtw - Jonathan. 9 brother for husband of Joy and greatly 
' toved lather and grandfather 

■UY - Od August 2nd 1990. to Anthony. JaneL Mia and 
to Pippa tn^e Vtncej & Mark. NpU and father In-law to 
a son, James Mark Curwoi. ■ 5°9er. Funeral Service al 
ROOT-Oo July 27th 1990 at Soulh Bnsuu Crematortum 
g George's HosoliaL ?li Toesa^ August 7th at 
Tooting, to Lucy (nee Parker] “? ,a ° Please no flowers, 
and Nicholas, a Brat son Donations if you wish to The 
< Max Charles Peter. Childrens* Society. 

As* 1 * 1 . lst "WnR-WERRY- On August 


■ 1990. 10 Jazz and DUnpie. a 


3rd 1990. at home. Derek. 

- - leaving his wife Vera and lus 

On August 3nll990. four children Emma. Julian, 

to E^nina lute Rain) and Andrew and Christopher. 
GeraM. thefr first child a son. For funeral details please 
WARO-On July 3fst 1990. to contact Mrs Mamn-Sperry. 
Sarah inte Moms) °"il NlgeL (0780) 41002S. 

a daughter. Rosanna. &«teter m u_ „ 

for Katherine. MITCHELL - On August 1st 

1990. in hospital. James 
• - (Jtm). aged . 73 years, of 

I - v Charlton Mackndl. 

MARRIAGES I Somerset, /ormerty of Lefty 

Green. Herts.. devoted 
Mrrnr „ husband of Owen, Funeral. 

■OSTOC1LCARFCjm.lt - On Service at Charlton Adam 
August 2nd. at Winchester, Church on Tuesday August 
Dr. Michael Bostodc to Mrs 7th at u 30 am. No flowers. 
Anne Carpenter. Enquiries and if desired 

• donations for Kidney 

I — 1 — — ■■■ ■ v Research c/o W Jk. Forsey A 

t^SSSRL. I SZ^sorJST* 


(^^JARWAGES^J 

•OSTOOLCARFEMTER - On 

August 2nd. al Winchester, 
Dr. Michael Bostodc to Mrs 
Anne Carpenter. 


GOLDEN I 

ANN IVERSARIES I 

RUAIK-On August 2nd 1990. 

BEU_-WATERFHXD - On 

. flii ond *Z|v| iQAn -1 55. BetOVCfl 

-Montevideo; Ian Bcdlo Ruth 
warerfMM. 4a Ftfher Lane. 

iHmw sim mamw Ufiorgma. Treosmu son of 

“ n * KMn - Nottt - RoMn'Blakedey and dearest 

• • . brother of Kevin and Pippa. 

I 1 . fc. ' Funeral enquiries to L. 

DEATHS ^ 5 . L*- ^ toz w> 

BAILEY - On August 1st 1990. RtttHTON - On August 3rd 
Mariorie (BUD. beloved wife . 19g 0- The Right Reverend 
of Artie Bailey and mother of Dom Dyfrtg Rushlofi O&B^ 

Fernanda Rolle. She gave formerly Abbot of , 

her body for medical Prmknash. peacefully In Ms 1 

research so there wit] be no *»*ep- Funeral at Prtnknash I 

funeraL No flowers mease. Abbey Thursday August 9th 
but donations If desired to at li am. 


DEATHS 


Mariorie (BUD. beloved wife . t«0. The Right Reverend 

of Artie Bailey and mother of Dom Dyfrtg Rushlofi OSA. 

Fernanda Rolle. She gave formerly Abbot of 

her body for medical Prmknash. peacefully In Ms 

research so there win be no »KeP- Funeral at Prtnknash 

funeraL Mo flowers please. Abbey Thursday August 9th 

but donations if desired to at 11 am. 

Arthritis mid RheumaUsm __ 

Council. 41 Eagle Street SMC - On August 1st 1990 


London WC1R AAR. or to 
The British Heart 
Foundation. 102 GMuonter 
Pfaoe. London W1H4DH. - 


Birth and Death nonces 
may be accepted over the 
telephone. 

For publication the 

foBowing day 
please telephone 
by 5.00 pm 

Monday 10 Thursday. , 
4pm Friday. j 
9JOam-1.00pm Saturday | 
for Monday's paper. 

071 481 4000 ! 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


HR A MU p. HSaantMM with 
lo announce ttw cngagentwii of 
her younaesl dtughlv. Sharon 
Kim. lo Doctor Thomas 
LLewctyn PtiUttps. etdest son of 
Doctors J. K. A E. PIUUhM. i 


nun SCHOOL 1943. Form V. 
contact Cnarico. 28212 Bngoa 
HU) Rond. Euorne. Orroon. 
97406. USA. 


SMKY-DINK + Luc the Luc 
. are tying me knot. Nothing's 
gonna stop them nowti 


WHWtOW - masON. The wed¬ 
ding of Elaine ABson winrow 
and Steven Michael Rotaon 
lakeo place today. Lore and bc« 
wishes from both families. 


STUDENT 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 


TH O NEWSPAPERS LTD. Ree- 
oRnnend dial before reptytng to 
. •ny o«tvertte*nJ«rmm«se col. 

nrans. please take an normal 
. nrecmmonaiy mrasom. » 
Times Newspapers Lid. cannot 
be held rwoonsfbte for any ac¬ 
tion or mss resuWno prom an 
advertbemem carried in time 
couuma. __ 

AMBLU generous price paid 
for spare a&mfle vouchers. 
Richard aftr6p<n 071 6036378 

'AUVU stud, seeks unfv 
BmPegiw sponsor, rrievam 
vacation work OTV3 422S6S. 
AMORICULVMIE. S ooaiWMff «* 
students, an mas tree work. 
Ooropmnre roles0483 233338 


METRO Mayfair 1 OL two years 
old. 14.000 ratio £3.990. Tel: 

021 468,2645 _ 

MM , Roadster 1973 AComie su 
verb an round onslnal condi- 
lion- Tel- 0344 TTEOSg IDsrig) 
MOL. Ibank you lor everything- I 
love you so much, datre. 
NEW Casta S.F.4Q00 dWQt dia¬ 
ry. £40. Tct GDMl OBI 748 
1933 _ 

NKH - Happy EUrUuUy. besl 
wishes from Ian and Henry. 
RACHEL CANUCK, Happy 21*1 
on 7th AuguoL Love from ad 
Itef Frosts. 

RUMBLE Man- 27 seeks lemp 
o/am top SeM/Oci anyudno le- 
Oal conmlerod. 0787 474S7I 
ROOMS, remotes pref er r ed. Fuu 
laclUtes. Facma smsthsm 
Comm. 081 677 9305 anyUme 
Hr W L OCK HOLMES. Basil 
RalMmne videos wanted, will 
pay. Phone Jaoon 062887S399 
SICDC deepest umpaihy over In 
dia. um b the uevmnisig-Happy 
Birthday Bbaheen. 

SFELUNS KM book -Concern of 
Modem Phytecs* £9 rrp £12.60 
Mr Metna 081 332 9922 
ST ANDREWS ■ Central - 2 room 
flat. All rtec m c. snared warden. 
Tab 0534 77107 
■TOUT; WeU done Joanna on 
your ouaUflcauon - Family 
Conors luiaUons _ 

STUDOfT seeks ctW emoloytnenl 
until Ort (career after unirersi- 
ly? >. C Porcas 0621 816919 




VAIWY. Lawrence m ngr ah on 
your half cennnr 6th auo. Jac- 
queliiie CJirfalotrfier Anwrala 
WANTED - 2 b e diwan IW Cen¬ 
tral London respond Mr female 


WORDS warned for-,- FVfvale of 
Die Buffs. DS NeW. 1 HHI View 
Gardens. HX3 7BT. 


BIRTHDAYS 


ELKE happy birthday. Nor as old 
as the QM. See you m Madrid. 
Lave OovaanL 

HMD MCKMAN MAGUIRE Of 

Newark, congratulations- love 
and beat wishes on your 21 st 
Birthday. 


SERVICES 


CAMERON - on August 2nd 
1990. suddenly -in Hobart. 
Tasmania. J*m« Stewart. 
Dear husband of Rosanna 
fGotrlan) and father, of 
Edwins and Jsm»- 

DALTON - On July SIS *990 
John • Brendan, beloved 
husband of Va). Remnero 
Mass wBi take plan . al 
* Downside Abbey. Stratton* 
on-the-Fosse, on .Monday 
August 6th at 12 noon. 
EnqulrteslD AJ. Wakcay and 
Sons. 91 East Street. 
Bndport. Dorset. 


Noriibs David- -■Bridger SmmSiw32Sif! i£Sk 

OftE. of Prospects Combo. 

Oxford: as-resutt. of a road Attnacttve sum cooaoe Eaw 

jeonhe. his daughters - gB fc-Ss3S JSSg; 6— 

vntato ™i MWIK. Ten end duel. Can- 
Oaahny- and hy . gratxd atioui for suver wadding 1 

KS&ddren^Srt - 

grandriiUdren. A valiant "r™ - Canayn' and John 
£y mr t iinumi Mr ili-ii Weddmo Congratulations • 

w aL. 

Church. Stonesfleld. on F I*2- 

u&fiSAs nacai? 

lor the National Trust for 0888 

Engiand -and Wales c/o 


AT LAamL—An introduction 
Agency that understands how 
much you hate the (nought of 
going lexe there... Surely, only 
desperate people go lo agcnciet. 
donT UHy7..Wroegil We are 
Sara Eden IniroducUOftt. wBere 
attractive. mimigenL baatnere 
& pre tea Bton ol people come 10 
be (niroauced to gcogle lust like 
themselves. Windsor 0783 830 
360. 11 could change your life 




FOR SALE 


TICKETS 
FOR SALE 

When responding lo 
advertisements readers 
are advised lo csiaoilsh 
the face value and full 
details of tickets before 
entering into any 
commitment. 

BIRTHDAY 

newspapers 

1642-1990 

The Ultra Mock and Uv «i*u 

efietee 01 original newspapers in 
BieUK. 

Also Sunday wperefrom 1915. 
Heady lor presenuik n. 
same day despatch £17 SO. 

REMEMBER WHEN 
368 Brighton Road. 

Soulh Croydon, Sunvy. 
081-688 6323 
Accegs/Vlsa areepted. 


ALL TICKETS 

Pnanum. Saigon. Lcs MB. 
Aspects. Cats. 

Rolling Slone*. Prince. 
Fleetwood Mac, Bowk. 
Nigel Kennedy 
Charity ShH Id 

PIC'S ALL SOLD OCT SHOWS 
AND SPOUTING EVENTS 

071 323 44S0. 

24 Hours on 0860 654143. 


COWES WEEK 

60 ft motor yacht with 
captain A crew. 
Highest International 
standard*. 

For corporate or private 
charter. Single day or 
Mode booking!, 

Tel (0590) 682379 
Fax (0590) 683664 


A MRTM-DATE Newspaper pre¬ 
sentations. Original. From £16. 
Open Saturday. (07271 43g77. 

ALL TICKETS bouttil A sold. 
Phantom. Saigon. Ascoi A 
crickel. All sold out events. Tel: 
071-287 8894/0. 071-437 

4245. Fax 071-734 0660 


rwvmo- (rein £ 1 7.oo per muotc 

yard Tel: 0942 866266 

OFFICIAL agency lor ticket* al 
aoorovrd once*. Inc Cats. 
Slones. N Kennedy. FleelwOOd 
Mac eir. CCs 07 1 83a 2755. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


F1AMO SALE. new-, resitted and 
digital Free rautegue Piano 
Workshop Ltd. aOA Higngale 
Rd IJW5. 07 1 967 7671. 


ANIMALS & BIRDS 


FIC LOVERS Vwinamese Pol Bri¬ 
bed pigo 1ST Ule. lo good hornet 
Only. i0327) 842212. 


SATURDAY 

RENDEZVOUS 


TIMES NEWSPAPERS LTD. r.- 
serve* me nghi 10 refuse an* 
adveiusement pul forward lor 
pubHcaiton in ihew column* 
The use of a Box number is r<*r- 
onunended wrwn adsctlising. 
Bel ore replying 10 any adirr 
tccfnenl in Uicsc cnhrmtis. 
ptcese lake all normal prrccu 
tionary measure*, as Tuna 
Nrwvoapcrs Lid cannot Oc held 
responsible (or am ortion or 
loss resulting from an ad'.rrUMv 
ment earned in uiese columns . 


PERFECT 

MATCH 

DINNER 

EVENINGS. 

For single business ana 
pram.ionj| pte.'Ur. 

Join u* ana make new inends 
of Uie opposite sox 

Call 071-722 72C*. 


ALL YOU 
NEED IS LOVE. 

Bui wlwrelogo [oUndIt? 

Call Jennifer Wills 
ai Matches 
Introduction Service 
071-287 0935. 


SATURDAY 

RENDEZVOUS 


DRAWING 
DOWN THE 
MOON 

The thinking, person's 
■niroduciton agyncx. 
“An utmaricL pcixomliwd 
scTkice” The Time* 

For pinfciMonal. cic>iii*i: anj 
business people ii* ing in 
London andS. Earn 
Foi j fnerJli amuiniio .1 
ptiuni-lah) 

071-937 88S0. 

93S 2151 

Eiubtotej wn. McmtkiABIA 


THE 

CHAMPAGNE 

SET 


Aiiracm*? 

WeU edurplea ? 

Lnbdifsably unailoclwd ? 

Cnampagne lasuims. dinner 
panies. nails. waiersporiN 
ddi-,. gckaninq arid more .. 
Inlcreslcd 7 
Call 

THE CHAMPAGNE SET 

C'-I-SsJ 11:: 

Mon BFn 9am opm. 

6ji Sim 2 pm 


WE DONT 
BITE! 

So why not risk 
a call to 

SOCIAL 

BUTTERFLIES 

Personal 

Introductions and 
exciting events for 
very special, 
attractive, 
professional people. 
071-736 1421 


Newsprints from £7X0. The 
quality service. Press Archives 
Tel (07321 63355. 


ggrj 


IP! 







ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Greco * Co.. St tfigti SireeL 
Eynstnra. Oxford 0X8 I HE. 

SALMON - On August 3rd. 
peacefully- Lady Wendy Cnee 

r %S5 M Sk 

ESKr- s£tee GU £ nS S. m'KKSB 

WSSSSStJt ■ 

followed by cremation. No Green, nwii. 

flowers by reooesLdonations - '_ . _ . 

in Itcu to R-N.L.L c/o. Hon. SREWMNC - On Angi^ajd. 


Treasurer. Board • of 
Administration. Bulwer 
Avenue. A Thanksgtvlng 
Service to be announced 
later. 


Waller Shewring. Classics 
Master of Ampteforth 
CoUege. York. Requiem Mass 
at Amplefarth AWo on 
Monday August 61h at 10am. 


LLB (Homi AngUa CoUege 
Chelmsford 1985-90, Joanne 

DYLAN UK arignals required by 
recenlty ransacked midnu de» 
wee, oaaa 7isooe _ 

CJWLC Annual 3 £3. Rupert 
books £3. Early tatguias. TeL 
York 400045 

.EDWARDS tnankyeu on for work 
tog uralnstv during our wm- 
dtog day. Love cam a Nlaia 

ESCORT 1100 . B rag. very good 
rend. 1 year MOT. £2.l00ana 
Medway (0654) 2B1B76 

FLAT wonted. South London 
double bednn. lounge. RUcften 
£90040 pw, Tel: 0620 4296 

NATTY Both Birthday. 10/8/90. 
Mirtnei Horrlwn: HoinUands 
H*L nartmgron. Lovg ihs lamflv 


WHnnour those who g»e 
Itiafr lives Kxoorcountiy. But wtai 
_tf ItoM who stand the same j 
tonromoax TOBl-.. ttw 

The&tedcesMBnlWWRR 
SocKtv ores fcr men and mocn 
hum msovccsiMb Maying 


For ttw etdariy and mgtdaOy 
■In our homes and centra#. 
PLEASE HBJ 1 US 2 Cara* by 
segMtRi rfn s sM sa saw g 
lasdog a legacy tor Mm hdara. 



ANEW 

FLAME? 

You couM rind one al 
CANDLEBL'RNCRS 
Personal lnirodiictunis and 
Enchanted Evenings leu 1 v «y 
attractive and discerning 1 
profeauorul people 

071 -371 5535. 

ARE YOU seeking a Hoang rela¬ 
tionship?. Uwn why nol contact 
The Three Cram, the proles- ! 
sKxial cream e and business 
peoples introduction agency. 
Telephone 081 959 8799. 

DECENT Guy. 40. 611. slim. Nth 
Yorks CoasL very south(uL 
rhanonallr. warm and humor¬ 
ous. loieiUgenL financially 
vsecure, emotionally undam 
aged, stable, no Ues and many 
friends, broad interests lexceol 
■ceru Requests the company of 
an articulate, sparkling girl of 
30/35 Vrs- ull. eWganl. self as¬ 
sured. to snare stimulating and 
glamorous llfe-stsle and lo m- 
joy lltc support of gentle man of 
high standards. No catches! 
Photo please lo BOX A88 

Dflum PARTUS ff you Ye pro¬ 
fessional. single. 25+ and like 
tuning out in good restaurants 
wiui stimulating company, call 
oai 306 92&S. oaf 36? 1896 

GREAT Looker. Grout legs Croat 
cook Seeks weal gentleman 10 
enhance nol so great social life. 
Reply 10 BOX B74 


HEATHER JENNER ■ The Mar¬ 
riage Bureau ie«. 1939 Mem¬ 
ber SMB J Why not tel our 
experience help you fmd a part¬ 
ner? 124 New Bond SI. W1. 
071-629 9634. __ 

I AM A GRADUATE ex-Naval offi¬ 
cer aged 32. wM-rcad and trav¬ 
elled. interested in music, 
children and possUHy writing. If 
you are a chaste girl. Ule 204- 
Ish. with a sense of humour and 
adventure who. like me. has 
been angle loo long, then please 
wnte 10 John. BOX 890 


MeOMHGtBLE Lothario. 38. sot 
vent and wed educated, and 
thinks there should be more 
laughter In life, would love 1 # 
hear from like-minded Ladies. 
40-sowi. who would eniov an 
occasional light hearted dalli¬ 
ance. London. Kenl. Surrey 
area Photo appreciated. Reply 
lo BOX AS6 

JANUS INTRODUCTION Bureau. 
Professional and nationwide. 
Est 1982. Member ASIA. Free 
brochure. TH: IOS6S1 52516 0 
Cuktu Avenue. Knuuford. 
Cheshire. 

LONDON Retired gentleman seeks 
friends for c om panionship and 
iraveL snare expenses. Reply to 
BOX AS2 


MX A MATCH Would >-00 like lo 
team or pursue your hobbies 
and Interests with like-minded 
people? We arrange lor groups 
of rontpaopte people 10 pursue a 
range of indoor and outdoor ac¬ 
tivities. including: saipng. Scu¬ 
ba. windsurfing, pottery, opera, 
painting, canoeing, country 
house weekends, bridge parlies, 
and many more activities. For 
more details phone Gerry on 
081 660 89S3. 


SWISS rGEfMMt speaking male. 
40-S-Sirs. sought by attractive 
Bntnn/5wtn lady lo share love 
of B ernese OBertand and much 
more. Reply 10 BOX BSO 


THE ULTIMATE in small, mode- 
to-measure marriage bureaux' 
tSTeJ.f Es«. i960 Katharine' 
Allen. IB Thayer Si. London 
W1M 5LP Tel 071-935 311& 

TOP PEOPLE are introduced 
■nrough us <E»t 1985) Cxoru 
Ull- Introductions OBI 763 
1799 or our Exclusive Parties 
10323)490636. Both 24 nr mes- 

_ sagrs. 

WE HEED MDi Real mmi To lorn 
our Gourmet Club u you are 
single. 30+ call the ladles al The 
Single Gourmet OTi 937 aszz. 

WIDOW. South of England, var¬ 
ied Interests, looking for inter¬ 
esting man «45 won sense of 
humour 1 needed to be doing 
thhlk Please send photograph. 
Rc«y to BOX B38 


COMBAT STRESS 

&£BWBlfcnflHM&mSoa«r 


13 Hmod RokJ. Lmtan. SW64QP. 
TAR-3710111 
Reg am* ho 

Ftumeify aw SOS Eoorty . 

*Gn Igr the BW|r md Maw far DM 
. Hun HAL 811- A 


announcements 


0 % FA ATC Why the Samaritans are 

O I the last people you should 

about people who are blind think of giving money to. 


august 4 On this Day 


A short-lived Metropolitan Police 
strike in support of a police union 
spread to Birmingham and Liver¬ 
pool where, out of a force of about 
1,500, more than 500 were on strike. 
Throughout the weekend, there was 
extensive looting. 


hooligans in 

LIVERPOOL 

Central Liverpool tonight represents 
a war zona and is I write this evening 
the report comes that there has been 
firing and wounds. Soldiers with steel 
helmets and fixed bayonets patrol the 
streets. Vast crowds gather and gaze 
on the scenes of last night's orgy of 
destruction ami $t._ George’s Half 
presents an impressive background 
to a (gugpr containing hundreds of 
soldiers. 

There are military lames contain¬ 
ing complements of a rmed meru 

awaiting any call that may be made, 
and grimmest and most significant of 
all, several tanks. Hundreds of yards 
of shop frontages in London-road, 
Bvrom-street, Scotland-road and 
elsewhere are boarded up or m 
process of being so protected, but. m 
most cases, the precaution has been 
taken too late, for last night boot 
stores, jewellers’ shops, fumiteae 
bouses, and big stores were smasneo, 
looted and wrecked. Today’s simile is 
that London-road is the Vpres of 

Liverpool , 

The trouble began late on F riday 
right when several shops were 
racked. The hooligans of the Scot- 


« of the depletion of the police 
ce and let themselves go. Last, 
[fat’s developments were worse 
In was anticipated, for ^ 

Mfiht that the presence in the 
Sof 100 soldiers might have a 
titary effect. 

Anarchy broke out, and_ even m 
.^pool’s unfortunate history of 
ike troubles the position, was 
latently never more Mnous. 
eets wwe crowded nrcre d^sdy 

^ usual and thCTewasafe^uyof 

Hthexaiofi iB the am. It was as 
ugh people were arfcmg what 
fht happen- Apprehension was. 


speedily justified. Soldiers were on 
guard at spots, where disturbance was 
deemed likely, and a cordon was 
- drawn across London-road where it 
faced St George’s Plateau. 

It was in London-road that the 
Etokm broke. Shortly before midnight 
there came reports. of looting in 
Scotland-road, Great Homer-street 
and parts of West Derby-road. The 
first signal was the attack on the 
premises of Mr. Latarche, jeweller, 
London-road,. where the-looters, after 
smashing the window, got away with 
the valuables. 

Gangs of youths and young men 
proceeded along the thoroughfare, 
stopping at first one shop and then 
another. The air resounded with the 
crash of large plate-glass windows. 
The looters carried pieces of iron, 
heavy stones and other missiles, 
which they used to demolish the 
panes, while in some cases the doors 
were prised open with the ease and 
ingenuity of the cracksman. Huge 
gaps in the windows having been 
made, tire youths, fearless of pieces of 
glass, jumped in and made a lightning 
sweep of the articles. The roadway 
was littered with goods, from watches 
to costumiers’ dummies. It was done 
quickly and only a short distance 
from the guard of soldiers. 

The position soon became woree. A 

city magistrate arrived and the 
soldiers made an advance up 
London-road with bayonets levelled. 
The marauders took to their heels up 
site strata, bat, with the most, daring 
audacity, quickly came into tire open 
again, after the troops had advanced 
up the road and resumed their 
smashing work. 

In one district, rough-looking 
women, out for loot, kept dose to the 
youths'and indicated which shops 
were fikely centres forspoiL Then the 
youths Went upon their work of 
apoKatiozu. 

Bayonet chargea were the order of 
the night, for ^white events were going 
forward in London-road, the Scot¬ 
land-road and Great Homer-street 
areas wra centres of similar trouble. 
Many shops, principally grocers, boot 
and clothing. establtehments, were 
being sacked, and in this locality the 
sum total of damage and loot was on a 
for greater scale than on the previous 
evening. So serious did the state of 
affairs become here- that a volley of 
rifle fire was tried 25 an expedient. It 
was between three and four o’clock, 
before there was any sign of matters 
subsiding, but tire areas had to be 
guarded throughout the night— 


* They want to work 
They need to live normal lives 
* They enjoy pleasure, leisure and holidays 

2 5dndON 1 LnndonAssoaafontatheB&idrnakeit 
afflOCiflON possible. Help us please with a donation 
FOR THE or covenant now and remember us with 
■ff ggjg.BLIND! a legacy lata: 

LONDON ASSOCIATION FOR THE BUND 

RefJT 14-16 Vfemey Road, LonOo/i SE16 3DZ. TR 071-732 S77I 


HAVE YOU 
MADE A WILL? 


mjsunde 


It’s written in plain English, gives down to earth 
practical guidance snows how wills present 
one of the easiest and most effective way to 
help people in need - and its free. 
Contact 

Lucille Goodwin 
Oxfam LG73 

FREEPOST, Oxford 0X2 7BR 
Tel: (0865| 510505. 


The Samantans otter a sympathetic ear to thousands 
of desperate and suicidal people each week. 

Leaving money to us in your will could help us 
continue providira comfort and understanding, 24 
hours a day. 365 days a year 
Your donation will keep this vital service going. So 
please, as a last thought think of the Samaritans first 
Write to Simon Amtson, 

The Samantans. Room B. 17 
Uxbridqe Road. Slough SU 15N 
for further details. 


The 
Samaritans 


Kidney 
Research 
Saves Lives 

Please help with a donaSon 
now and a legacy later 

NATIONAL 

caeca? 


RESEARCH 




Dtn-Tt «2 Lne UntL imaa SE1 



Fighting cancer 
on all fronts- 


Cystic Fibrosis 



to lift the sliadow 
of diabetes 

and the link with ■ Allthesearedosetyconnected 

■ Kidney (fisease with Diabetes. As the leading 

^ 7 , contributor to research we 

I Shortened we must And the cure for this 

span still incurable disease 

V Heart disease Vbur legacy will bee 

m wi—ii ii_ _ ■forever'reminder of 

I Amputations your will to help us 

■ Bfindness defeat diabetes. 


• 11 *•”! {1 v '31.vv r • vi.s.71 


10 Queen Anne Street London W1M0BD 

RECJ5rERE0O4ARnYN0-!rei99 


v>- •>/- 




rmr/T 


THE HEART RESEARCH 
CHARITY. 

Wa’re Bating me figra sgana nean 
ouasa by ftsnnig ranurci vm its 
(austtLprew f iwnctqifeaawwL 

Phm sand a donation to your 
rapMSi ata |sm Vtfww Psgss) ra 
to [be 8n3*ii Hnrl FounctsHon. 
UDGtoucwur Place. 
Loaded W1H4&H. 


ANIMALS 
IN NttD 



WORD-WATCHING 
Aasiren from page 22 

KOFTGARl 
(a) Work in which a 
pattern fraa.it on sted 
is inlaid wiih gold, from 
rbe L’rdn kaftan to bear 
+ gan making: **Ar- 
monr of ntravagsmly 
intricate koftgari was 
worn by lerrible 
Sikh horsemen." 
DOCIMASY 
(cl Scrutiny, applica¬ 
tion or tests, essay inp. 
examination nf dnigH. 
originally in Athens a 
judicial enquiry into 
the character and ante¬ 
cedents of applicants 
for public office. Irani 
tbc Greek dokimaotitt 
to examine: “The 
applications of chem¬ 
istry to docimasy.” 
SNOOL 

(a) One »bo Submits 
tamely to wrong or 
oppression, a tame, ab¬ 
ject, or mean-spirited 
person, a wet wimp, of 
oterare origmrYODT 
saoois in love, and 
cowards in nar^Frau 
maiden grace are 
banish’d far.” 

HUFFER 

tal a long roll or 
section of Frmcb bread 
with a sandwich filling, 
commonly met la pah 
food, perhaps, not 
probably, derived from 
a connection with 
huffk'uis, a sort of tea¬ 
cake formerly made in 

Kent, or with huIC a 

Gloucestershire word 

for Ifehl pastry or pie 
erwst- 


BEDSIT W14 Large, snort' 

kiicncn/guiw gw Inc Tel’ 

10am 4pmori 727 2777 . Alter 

OBwi OVl w; 491,5, _ 

CLAPMAM M/F lus 2 bed flal 
D'^1 rm. all nwd com. gun. 10 
ttim luite/raninton. min pi.g, 
£75 pw fici Q8I<»7J 7929 

CLAPHAM SOUTH 2 rain, im*. 
Oan OoutNc room In large gar- 
mm (La ail moo cons cto pw 
i-*cl Ai J|| immcu. TclrOHl 676 
4516 'Ml or 071 5B3 2469 -Oi 

HARLEY ST Wl Vdnday lo Fn- 
4aj Prof gem. Rrtnvnm 
l.drrte ■uTvlrf IwsKill.-r, CH. T\' 
in Munou, ilai C32o pm me. 
TcHephaiie: 07> 936 0292 

NW2 Modem : bod Hal. ail amc- 
niU« C2» - blits. TH: 071 
ZS2 7482 t24 hni 

OVAL Prof 25-30 M/F. Igr room 
In house. 9004 Dus/lube. LOIttV 
9dn All omra. £65 pw OMI 
07| 735 2225 

SE4 Prof M/F. N/S. single room, j 
nr bR au omemlm. £3b0 pcm. 
081-091 4045 _ 

*T MARCAM i, TwicKennam. 

O/H in Irg lux flat 3 mint. DP 
SO rmrft RirtHTWM. AU mod 
rnns Sull yovng Prof. tMO 
tvm lot Tel 081-89! 4669. 
STOKE MCWMCTON Boon, lor 
n/x in vouno family tne xluie 
all fata £60pw. 071 249 4739 
■WT m/f. !s/5. for tux room 
with tuttirm en yuile Nr luDe. 
£120 pw incl. 071-937 4067. 


ACCOMMODATION URGENTLY 

rrq lor Qly InsliluUonx. Call us 
MKh your propertlLt. lo tel 
KtAMjlDMwdn 301 499g 
ATTRACTIVE Houses and Flats 
tet tor discerning Tnunls und 
Landlords ui all London areas. 
Liptrumd A Co tMI-444 1166 

BATTERSEA Bngtil spacious 3 
Bed nw wltn ndn neuly redrr 
F/F kIL £240 pu 071-22d 
1912 or 0764 0*3796. 

BELGRAVIA 2 bedroom Mews, 
reception, dming UKOen. £275 
PW. Tel: 071-730 7992 _ 

BELSOaC PH Bright studio flat 
c .large main room, kll/dlner. . 
bam. sull single or couple. 
£!46pw TH. 071 794 3143. 

CHELSEA Immar Lux balruiy 
apl. Dble bednn. Horn recep. 
Litis, nortelv 071 351 Cm&S. 

CHELSEA self contained bed- 
and balhroom in luxurs- 
house Available Monday.Fn- 
day Suit professional needing 
London base £l20pw. Full lei 
rwq- 071 362 2292 tnes. 

CHISWICK Modern 3 bedroom 
Mat. spacious. Iirniuc raw. 
G>7H. dw/ol. nr shops s, lube, 
oulel area. £220 pw oat 560 
4736 eves or 081 99S 6630. 

COMPANY LET tdf con. flat fully 
eauipeed. Palace go ns. urr. 
£225 pw Ring 071 284 1744 
HOLBORN Mansion Mock. mod. 
orn. auiet L bed flat. turn. £250 
pu. Co tel. TH 0892 31057 
PALACE GARDENS TERRACE 
we Large tui. newly dec oral 
ed. in-mo room, dbl bedroom 
will* oath/WC en suite Weil lu¬ 
ted kitchen with bullet Dor. 
Cl80 pw Tel: 0763 8822S3. 

ST JOHNS WOOD Hparkxi* lux 
turn 3 bed (IM 2 bath BaKonv 
Cdh. E4Q0 pw 071 723 0644 
3W1 Comlortable rial, own en- 
iram l bed. I recep. Short let. 
£110 pw. Q71 B34 017B 

EW12. kneiy. mortoiE. lur- 
rushed3bed dal. long tel. pretty 
garden, near common A shops. 
Cl90 pw ncp. 0aie»73 6922. 

SW8 Lux HI 2 bed. 2 bth. all mod 
com. sorts cnirp with pool. Mr. 
Prknq £266pw. 071-2650246, 

W14 Lux smc flat F/F. 3 beds, 
d/s persons. OCH. £250pw. 
Tel 0474 82 3983 pm or w/e. 


(SITUATIONS WANTED 


OXFORD Lndrrtradmto seeks 
muHosTncni or volumarv work 
tn August Tel- 081514 Jsll. 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


CHARITY COMMISSION 
Chanty hamteen Femer Cancer 
Rnrarcn Fund iL'nlicrsliy Cd- 
legp Hospital 1 Grimier London 
Tile Ownin' Comrar^aoners pro- 
parr to nuke a Scheme lor mis 
Charilv. Cofnv? o( the drall 
Sciutik- mas u- obtained from 
tnem <rrl: 23927 112 LDi at M 
Alban's Howe. 57-60 
Hjymoriiet. London Stt'iv 4Q.X. 
and mas Dr seen ai Site Managers 
Ollier. L'tul Adminblrdilon Dr 
oartmenL UnlscnlW College. 
Hcnatiai. OMccuon and supon- 
Inns may be setil lo the Cvtnmib 
rmners wlihln one moiiUi nom 
lOdjy. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH COL BT 
OF JUSTICE 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
NO. 005076 OF 1990 
MR. JUSTICE \i\XLQTT 
IN THE MATTER OF 
AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION 
INSL RANGE SERVICE 

MOLDINGS LIMITED 
ANO IN THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1085 
NOTICE IS HEBEBV GJ\ rx ihal 
■he Order of itw High Court ot 
Justice iChanrrrv DiiKicm>ilaled 
2 3rd July 1990 ronlirralm ilw 
redurlwn of Uie Mure premium 
account ol Ihr ahocr c ran pan v be 
£105.000.000 was rrgislemt by 
iiu- Rroisirar el Coro Pan •<-, on 
26<h July 1990 
Daiefl Lhk> Jlh day ■ 

CH Auguyl 1990 
Herbert Smith. 

Wouing Hot&e. 

35 Cannon Sliivl, 

London EC4M 5SD 
Solinion 1-jr in.- 
.move named Company 
Ret 127 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


OONDOONE. nr Branlant. 2 bed. 
fully furnished cottage on river 
Drotme. Tennis, swimming. 
Itching. Tel OIO-S3 S3D3S134. 
Far 33 S3 04 5169. 


SELF-CATERING I 
ITALY j 

•rear • S/calenng Ponoraa by 
Uie sea from £ 189 Incl nights A 
7 nt» Occam For informaHan i 
CMOguv Islands tABTA 17726 1 
ATOL 07BI 0703 332661. 

f SOMERSET & AVON 11 


SHEPPAR Locality. Cbunlry cot- 
■ages al in* loot of Uh- Mendips 
Stem2 TourtM Board graded. 3 
Key nighty commended. Tete- 
POOfir <09341 B42179. 


DOMESTIC AND 
CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


JAPANESE CuImih- chef and 
Sushi chef We require two high 
clou Japanese cuisine cluiv 
wiui 5 years plus experience. 
Musi be able lo speak Japanese 
as well as engUsh Solan - circa 
El6.000 to £20000 p.a. Con- 
laci: Mr Ilo. al NesniLo Japa¬ 
nese Rrstauram. 265 Upper 
Street. London N1 2UQ. Tel 
071 339 9977 


IN THE HIGH COLKT 
OF JUSTICE 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
NO. D9KI65 OT 1990 
IN THE MATTER OF VIRGIN 
RETAIL LIMITED 
AND IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 19S5 
NOTICE IS HEREBY CIV EN Ihal 
I he Order ot toe High Court ol 
Jiejico iChanrery Di« luom dated 
23 July 1990 contlrmiuu lin- it- 
dixlKMi ni the capilal ol ih<- abet ■■ 
named Company from 
£22.000.000 lo £2.947.996 and 
Itw Minute .uproied bv Ihe High 
Court showina with respect lo Uh- 
capilal of Ihe Company os altered 
Ihe several particulars motored 
by Ihe above-mmlloned Acl were 
registered by the Rents'rur of 
Companies On 26 JuLv 19)0. 
Dated Uus 4ih day 
of Auguu 1990 

Freshdelds iJPJR/PJW/3B144L> 
wniietnars 
o£- Fleel Street 
London EC4Y IHS 
Sollciiors lor the above 
named Company 

CPL REALISATIONS LIMITED 
■tormerty Chipman Play 
and Leisure Limned) 

IN MEMBERS' VOLUNTARY 
LIQUIDATION 

'Company Number ; 217939?) 
NOTICE TO THE CREDITORS 
OF CPL REALISATIONS 
LIMITED 

On 3! July 1990 me company 
was placed In memns' votun 
lory liniiidaUon and DA Howell ot 
Price Waterhouse. Haywood 
House. Dumfries Place. Cardiff. 
CFi 4BA was appointed liquida¬ 
tor by me shareholders 
The inuidMor gives notice pursu- 
am lo Rule 4.I82A of ihe Insol¬ 
vency AC1 1986 lhal the creditors 
of the company must send details, 
in writing, or any claims against 
the company lo Ihe liquidator, al 
the above odd rest, by 31 Auausl 
1990 winch b ihe last day tor 
proving claims. The Uquidaicr 
ahe gives notice inai he will men 
make a final a Ctrl but ton lo credi¬ 
tors and that a creditor who does 
not make a claim dv the dale 
mentioned will not be included in 
in disuibunon. 

The company is able to gay all lb 
, known creditors in full, 
i Dale: 31 July 1990 
: DA HoweU. Liatodalar 


LEGAL NOTICES 


Procedure de cancoTdai prrir ii-. 
banque*. ,4 les cai'ves d'--p d i<in<- 
Canton dr Gene-. »■ 

Dcbilrkc BANQLE DE CREDIT 
INTERN ATtONAL. CENEV L*. EN 
LIOLIDATION 

CpNCORD. VTA1RE 
1 TROIS1EME ET QUA TRIE ME 
DlMDETvDES NON PEDCL> 
ECHfJb 

En roniomutp do ran as otf 
ronermonl la procedure dr- run 
rardal pour K-. bopgun el l—. 

romev d'epargne. lcs nnidnuie. 

viui n'onl pos iic percuv dens in 
delai do di» ,ind ite- Id (Llle rte 
mLveen paiemenl. -icrnn; isipaib- 
vanv aulre lumiallli.- .-ntro i-ju. 
tes (TiaiKii-. perdanls -1 
ccheques, selon I'arl j.p. .. 

rehcepuon dr- crrancicr-i aiam 
rlt dcslnltTMvs par le dlvidi urn- 
lortuiloiro i option do Ft 5.ix>:- 
Lev Detnd tie paiement fli-. .v-nn- 
ei 4enie dividenaos -vsni ectu:, 
depuLV le ler noiv-mbrr :-eb. 
mpecllvemenl In 28 fel ro-r 199.:. 
el !■-. vHdes non prrn.s soul 
etfcrfe en paiemml a lous |i-. 
rreanctcrv mil en loroni i.> 
domande ill relnunuinl l.< 
for mult- lOinU- a Id cnCuLilre Nu. 
22 dOmenl cerwJolis. 

2 FHOFOSTlNi DE PAIEMEINl 
FOR FAtTAIRC ASTI Cl PC DEN 
SEME. ftEME ET ’EVIL 
[■IV IDE NOES NON PCRCLM 
11 esl propose d lous In cnsincn-rs 
de teur v rover un monian* 
(erfJiuire. pour stunt- ji- imj' 
ramwe. regresemoni k- x 
evllllle des 5eme. oeme el ?..-nu- 

OiMdi-iuls noti p—tcik- vcnuni ■■ 

ecTieainven 1991 I99r.ii '.99s 
Lin dclsi dc nua’ni-v mol a>\ 
tours, os lu doip do la pri-M-m— 

pubiiraiicti. psi accc-rde ju*: 
(TiTinriep. p.iur lairo valuir !.->irs 
drolls, do la irunnrc indUun- r.. 

- ocr.sus Passe re doLil.-|| er.- 
prra.dc Li ri-rurllilon ■>! miv ■ i. 
parnnciii mirry-nidlesoes Jim.-ri 
J«me dlilderwfe, nen p.-r.-ijs 
erhus ro do paiomcnl lerlaiMiio 
■uii nip.- r-nirn . rrr.incier-. 
'culcmonr qul srr-jui 

vaLihlcmcnl .ruriixudam. te 
dHjid .1 I'adresva- suivonlc 
Banquede Credit InliYTUiidnnJ en 
Uquulauoji 

comiotdotaire. c/o DrlMItc i. 
Touche 4A 

Cose poslah-71H l215Cen<.(t- 15 
Genet, h- 3 aoul |9c»j 
□Klee Ues p-jutsuiics cl On 
lailliues. Gencu- 
Detoillc 4 Touche SA 
Manna tour 


[ TRUSTEE ACTS jj 

NClTliTE Is huriCi nun puimfuii 
lb s27 of the TRUSTEE Acl. 1-V9 
lhal any person hav inn .■ CX.MM 
aqaimt or an INTEREST m ihe 
ESTATE ot an- ro inc Mi'j-cl 
pervsn's whose names addrt-sw; 
and dCMJIPUons are-,^-i oui tKlua 
(v hereby required in send par 
rrcjlars in wrilinq al he. rLiiu nr 
inlerevi lo 1 !»- pr ru>n or Per^srr. 
mentioned in rrlalion lo the or 
Ceased person ranu nvd U-t-i-re 
Uto dale specKicd aster which 
dare the islaii- n| thi- iloc.-usrsj 
w Ui hedtslrlbip.rd ns ihe personal 
rrprev-nlullics amoin I Ik per 
• uie. enlim-d Iheielo haiina r. 
qarn only 10 Ihe clturp-. and In 
leresls of whirn Uiej hai e had 
nniire 


BRl'IN Reginald .Arthur of 
Salway. Bunslrua. Trmg. Herts 
duu on I 1 April 1 990 Part iiu 
lots to KMd RawnH. Sultcitorv ol 
|J A 15 Craven Mmi. London 
WCL’N 5AD. before 5 Or Inner 
1990. 


S.VB1HE- Anlhonv Lennav of 
Two Roots Cnrrrs Tree Averuje. 
Chalfonl SI Pel's Burk., died on 

30111 April 1990 Particular, lo 

Macdonald Storey. SoIh u u rs nt 
14/15 Craven Sired. London 
WC2TS SAD. tolote 5 CH IP Per 
1990 


BE RT Mr Leonard V irtnr rif 35 
Paul Bv me Home. Orchard 
Close. Fmchlev. London NJ died 
an24lh April 1090 Particulars re 
Charles Russell Solicitor*, -.u Hale- 
Court. Lincoln's Uvn. Loudon 
WC2A 3LL. bv-Iare 5Hi October 
1990. 


Hall. Mrs viola Florence Geral 
dine ot £3 Eaton Pi.vre. London 
SVv'l died on join August IW 
pameutors to Chaim Pwwll So- 
liClIute ot Hale Court Lincoln's 
Irui. London \v CCA 3LL. bcinr- 
62i OrtOhiT ;99fi 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


THEATRES 

CoutiBBed Irimi page 18 


WYMOtfAarS THEATRE 071 96? 
1116 CC 071 867 1511/071 379 
4444 mo bk9 reel 071 4979977 / 
081 741 9999 ibfcg (eel 
____ RICHARD HARRIS 
"Ml URNS TRIUMPH ART IN A 
M«NT OF THEATRICAL MAGIC" 

Dally Mall 

-The performance will be counted 

one or the reasT m London 
FOR YEARS” Observer 
■SLA M 

EDWARD DE SOUZA 
HAROLD INNOCENT 

• In PIRANDELLO'S 
■trever. civvuvcd. saUrtcal 
comeny" Standant 

HENRY IV 


AST GALLERIES 


ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS. 

WCAOIU.S WRECORDED 
INFO 07! 433 .1916 7 

Edwardian Palnl&s* from the 
RA'» eoaoctioB 222nd Sommer 
CaMbtUso. mu :a Au;. Qpi-n 
Doth 1&6 me. Sun 


ONEMAS 



CURZBN MAYFAIR Curaon St 
0?5 465 S865 PHILIPPE 

NOIRET hi CINEMA PAHADt- 
50 *PGi Projv at 1 CO I no! Sum 
3306 iO»M “Do not nln" 
t> Mail winiMT of Oscar for 
hevi foreign Him 

CURZON PHOENIX Phoenix Si. 
otf Chjnaa Craw Hd 071 240 
9661 PHILIPPE NOIRET in 
CINEMA PARAM90 (PCI Prom 
at I 00 I nol Sum 3 M 6 10 
8 40. lU'inlwr ol OSC AR for 
besl foreign illmk _ 

CURZON WEST EKO snaliAburv 
Avenue WI 071 439 4805 
Rosanna Aruueite Tom Hul. e 
IP BLACK RAINBOW tlSl Pi on 
al 1 45 mol Sum 3.55 6 OS 4 
8-25 


THE 


TIMES 


CLASSIFIED 

A selection of advertisements 
from today’s columns. 


WE HAVE A HUGE 
RANGE OF ALPINES 

and Rockery Planls 
especially Saxifrages. 
Sedums 


SAVE YOUR FISH 

from ihe dreaded Heron. We 
can supply a Lifelike decoy 
Heron to place beside your 
pool. 


THERE IS A VERY 
STRONG EMPHASIS 

on preseniauon. ami (or Uie 
very happy our portions are 
(ar tugger man most. 


SPECIALISTS 

In oM reproduction EngUsh 
fumilure. desks, tables, 
chairs «c. 


Got rich missing 
opportunities Just off the 
King's Road and dose to 
Sloane Square. 



RESTAURANT 

Without a written menu. 1 
whole you will be piwnlwl 
tvilh inleresllng and evcilino 
dlsh« from which in choose. 


TO Ihe Isle Of Wight Irom 
13in Augirsi Jnrludmg your 
serty crossing or car hire. 


RENT 

A superb lodge in qtorinus 
Cornish cciurilrvude We 
have 2 exccllenl golf 
course's 


Sho pa round ........-....-..................... Pace-16 

Antiques & Collect inn - Hage E7 

Enk-nainments —.—.——..— Pay;e 18 

Y achts, Boats Si V\ utersports ... Page 30 














































































































































Weekend Living.- In Town 


Changing face 


White 









as nature 




boysi 











F or at least a decade Hampshire 
county council has been the 
front-runner in public architec¬ 
ture, consistently producing new 
buildings and adapting old ones with 
imagination and flair. Nowhere are these 
talents seen to better advantage than at 
the new 43-acre police training head¬ 
quarters at Netley, on the east bank of 
Southampton Water, which cost almost 
£20 million and was opened last month 
by the Duchess of York. 

Here, until the 1960s. stood one of the 
grandest hospitals in the country, 
stretching a quarter of a mile, with its 
own quay, railway, laundry, school, 
workshops and even a gasworks. During 
the second world war American soldiers 
took to driving Jeeps along the endless 
corridors. Earlier, the Royal Victoria 
Hospital was a sanatorium for soldiers 
returning shattered from the Crimea. 
Florence Nightingale, however, consid¬ 
ered that architectural pomp had been 
put before the needs of the invalids. 

When the hospital closed in the 1960s, 
all the buildings -were demolished except 
for the clock tower and the psychiatric 
Mock, Victoria House, the only mental 

hospital ever built by the _ 

British Army. -pl 

The fust phase of the 1 He 

new police headquarters ClilTli 

comprised a glazed , . 

atrium in the courtyard SCUlpt 

of the old block, sup- beam < 

ported on tubular col- - ... 

limns which branched LOC 11K€ 

out with the grace of /'hipfr'n 
Gothic fan-vaulting. CIUCl 

Next, Ian Templeton, the - 

head of design at the county architect's 
department, blended in a large new block 
of laboratories for the fraud squad, a 
colour photographic processing unit, a 
technical services unit, a scene-of-crirae 
department, and a major incidents 
emergency suite. 

Each department insisted on being at 
ground level and the result was a block of 
solid building with a footprint consid¬ 
erably larger than the original Victoria 
House. Everyone is used to seeing 
conservatories and white marquees on 
spreading lawns, and this image was the 
key to Mr Templeton's solution. 
“Everyone exclaims; *What on earth is 
this?',” says David Hopwood, the 
superintendent in charge. But after the 
initial shock most people like the blend 
of okl and new. Mr Templeton thinks the 
idea of an all-white building “may have 
come from seeing a vast roof all covered 
in snow”. 

As the block of buildings is so large 
and dense it had to be top lit. The county 
architects long ago abandoned flat roofs 
but economy dictated the cheapest 


The cost 
eliminated 
sculpting the 
beam ends in 
the likeness of 
chief constables 


possible parallel gabies — in effect, little 
more than a warehouse. Mr Templeton 
was able to break the mould by choosing 
a beam system of German origin. Vier- 
endecL, on which the entire weight of the 
roof is supported at the apex on long, 
deep beams. When the sun shines from 
east to west the light falls on the beams 
rather than ihe people below. The beams 
are. in turn, carried on columns about 30 
io 40 yards apart so that walls and 
partitions can be moved as needs change. 

On the west front the beams project 
like prows beyond the gable ends. 
Initially, the intention was to sculpt the 
ends in the likeness of the county's chief 
constables- Budget considerations elimi¬ 
nated such flourishes, as well as the 
coloured glass intended for the end 
windows. But these windows are none 
the less intriguingly anthropomorphic, 
with the hint of faces with small panes 
like eyes at the sides and rounded chins. 

Further movement is created by 
stepping the gable ends back and forth 
like a series of organ pipes, the interplay 
heightened by the protruding trellis 
wails, planted inside with large yews, 
inside, the new Palmerston block as it 

_ is called, is laid out round 

a series of glass-topped 
COSl walkways with shingle 

IcltCd gardens and islands, 

, planted in the Japanese 

Dg tile manner. The aim is to 

rtHq in emulate the luxurious 

u _ green courtyards and 

QCSS OI walkways at ihe county's 

ictnMpc college of technology at 

JbLauiCb Famborough. More con- 

tentious is the new 
gymnasium block, already dubbed the 
“bottlebank”. The architect, Huw 
Thomas, is now in private practice 
winning bouquets for his accomplished 
bam conversions. Here he was deter¬ 
mined to dispense with the usual ugly 
gymnasium box, hence the sloping roofs. 
The facilities are first class. What jars are 
the strident exterior colours — virulent 
pea and bottle green, which clash with 
each other even more than with the 
countryside around. Thought is being 
given to toning down one of the colours. 
It cannot happen too soon. 

Hampshire police staff spend one or 
two days each month training here. “The 
aim," Mr Hopwood says, “is to create an 
atmosphere where people no longer feel 
forced to attend but want to come.” 

The money spent on the building has 
mea5nt cuts elsewhere, for example on 
improvements to police stations. But in 
creating a single complex for the whole 
county. Hampshire hopes to recoup 
some of the cost by inviting other forces 
to use iL - 

Marcus Binney 


Hals 










A quick dip iatothe 
options for pool % 
and beaeh-hateis 1 












**- !, **ii*-*j 
r./r'&S' 1 



1 ' Ji ; : A... Lkrf ■ ■ ' 


f V \ 


Mm 


dmii 


AS THE temperature soars, the 
dream of recap t uring those magic 
moments of childhood, splashing 
about in ponds, rivers, canals and 
lakes, becomes ever more seduc¬ 
tive. 

Butin an increasingly samnsed, 
i security-obsessed society, it. is 
difficult to find anything.; other 
than a chlorinated local swimming 
pool in which to cool down on a 
scorching afternoon. The natural 
places stffl exist, of couree, -but 
many of them are no-go areas, 
covered by bylaws and health 
warnings. The ones where swim¬ 
ming is officially allowed fre¬ 
quently have lifeguards on duty 
and. routine pollution checks. 

The three famous ponds in 
north London — Highgate Fond ' 
(for men), Kenwood POnd (for 
women) and Hampstead Pond . 
(mixed bathing). — are checked 
monthly to ensure that ‘ they 
conform to EC guidelines on 
natural bathing ponds. They also 
have their own lifeguards. Entry is 
free and the ponds are open all . 
week. 

Also in London is the Ser¬ 
pentine in Hyde Park. Membetsof 




M i ,1 


"5 




The main lake of 
theSeipentinein 
Hyde Park is v 
currently affected 
by the epidemic 
of blue-green algae 










£ T* ""T 






Walking tall in a £20 million temple of anti-crime: the new Hampshire police t raining headquarters alongside Southampton Water 


Starting new chapters 


Events in town 


THIS WEEKEND 



• Summer In the City: Week-long 
festival begins today with a free 
family day — music, dancing 
games. Punch and Judy. Rubik 
competitions. Events suitable for 
children aged 2-11 and parents. 
Fireworks on last day at 10.30pm. 
Barbican Centre. London EC2. 
until Aug IL Tomorrow 12.30- 
6pm. then daily from /Jam. five. 
Workshops £1. £2 (fi in her 
information 07J-63S 4141, extn 
2JS). 


streets. Nottingham . today noon to 
I lpm. tomorrow 2- 10pm. free. 

• Open air Scottish dancing: 
Groups and societies show their 
talents. Also Highland dancing, 
bands, and a piper. 

Paternoster Square. London EC4. 
today and each Saturday until Aug 
25. 6.30-Spm (information 0372 
7244S7). 


• British Transplant Games: 
Golf, volleyball, tennis, athletics, 
swimming and other competitive 
games — in aid of all organ 
transplants. 

Crystal Palace National Centre. 
London SE20. today 9am-6pm. 
tomorrow 9.30am-5.30pm. £1. 


% Bristol harbour regatta: Annual 
rally of more than 250 pleasure 
boats from regional boat dubs. 
Continous programme of events 
and displays in and around the 
harbour. 

Bristol city docks, today I-IOpm, 
tomorrow 1 -6pm. free. 


• Nottingham riverside and organ 
festival: Street fair, barrel organ, 
jazz, street theatre and. tonight at 
10.30pm. a fireworks display. 
Victoria Embankment and city 


• Enfield steam and country 
show: Steam engines, traditional 
and country crafts, pastimes and 
skills and a variety of other 
entertainments. 

Trent Park. Barnet, today, tomor¬ 
row 1 lant-6pm. £2.50. child£130. 

NEXT WEEK 


• The M a pa pa Acrobats: Kenya's 
famous entertainers on their first 
visit to Britain. 


Waterman’s Park. Waterman’s 
Arms, Brentford. Middlesex,.Mon- 
Wed. 8.30pm. £5.95 (box . office 
081-568-1176). 

• Facets of China: Exhibition of 
photographs taken by Keith 
Cardwell on an extensive tour; a 
limited edition of prints will be on, 
sale. 

Neal Street East. Neal Street, 
Covent Carden, London WC2. 
Mon to Aug 31 during normal 
opening hours. 

• Great British beer festival:. 
CAMRA's national festival. Pub. 
games and live music in the 
evening. 

Brighton Metropole Hotel, King 
Road, Brighton, Sussex. Tue-Fri 
during normal pub opening hour ,fc 

• Dream merchants: Important i 
exhibition (on loan from the 
International Museum of Photog¬ 
raphy in New York) about the 
making and selling of films in 
Hollywood’s golden age. 

Museum of the Moving Image. 
South Bank. London SEI (071- 
928 3535). Thurs until Sept 12. 

Judy frosfIaug 


the 147-year-old Serpentine dub 
swim “at their own risk? in the 
main lake, which is now affected 
by bhie-gxeea algae. There is, 
however, a lido area which is 
tidarinated and open from May to 
September at a cost of £2 for 
adults, £i children. • 

In Oxford the public can swim . 
in three small tributaries of die 
Thames atWolvercote, Tumbling 
Bay and Eongbridges. Wooden 
wens separate them.fipm other 
river users. . 

• -In Sutton Park, Birmingham, 
swimmers sometimes take a dip in 
Bracebridge Pool, despite notices 
prohibiting them from doing-so. . 
Since it is. regularly used fry a local - 
swimming dub, however, it tanot 
always possible to keep tbepublic 
out. The local council prefers 
swimmers to use the unhdatedfido 
in the park. Cost £1 J^CTadidts, 60p 
children.. 

'• For those who live on the coast 
but hate beaches, there are dozens 
of Natural rock pdols rockedaway, 
such as the oneat the south epdof 
Whitley Bay in Tyne and Wear. 

One of the problems of bathing 
in natural waters is the risk erf 
drowning as a result of the shock 
induced by sudden cold, according 
to file Royal Society for the 
Prevention of Accidents. Even 
during heatwaves the temperature 
beneath the surface can be 
“paratyticafly coItT. 

Other potential risks include a 
fetal virus, leptospirosis, carried 
by rats, which penetrates through 
the ears, eyes, ndse and throat of 
swimmers or tfirough cuts or 
abrasions, and causes Weil’s dis- • 
ease. There is also the notorious . 
blue-green algae which can cause 
illnesses ranging from skin rashes 
and eye irritation to vomiting, 
diarrhoea and fever. . 


SaixyBrompton ; 


Help: James Willing, personal caterer 


Cautious optimism: “Our chances of surviving are better, 1 ' says the association secretary, Janet Allen 


Easy living in the grand manner 


BRITAIN’S subscription libraries, 
some more than 200 years old. are 
an endangered species. However, 
after a year's campaign to make 
their services better known, the 
Association of Independent Li¬ 
braries has celebrated its first 
anniversary with optimism. 

The association comprises 12 
libraries from Newcastle upon 
Tyne to Penzance, which banded 
together to publicise their exis¬ 
tence and facilities. Eleven are 
housed in buildings of special 
architectural interest 

Founded between 1768 and 
1841, before the creation of the 
public library service in about 
1850, the subscription libraries 
combine care of their historic 
buildings and collections with 
stocking the latest publications. 

Unlike most other libraries, 
they are owned by their members. 
Annual subscriptions range from 
£5 to £80. The association's 
president is Lord Quinton, the 
former chairman of the British 
Library. 

Most of the libraries are valu¬ 
able buildings set in prime sites. 
Millions of pounds are needed for 
maintaining and restoring build¬ 
ings and keeping older stock in 
condition. 

Each library has a special 
character. Nearly all the books 
have been bought at the request of 
members, so the contents reveal 
much about those who have used 
the libraries over the decades. 

Janet Allan, the secretary of the 
association and the librarian of the 
Portico, in Manchester, says: "Be¬ 
tween all the libraries in the 
association there are more than 
one and three-quarter million 
books, many of them rare. 


Subscription libraries 
are gaining a higher 
profile, and not just 
because of their books 


“Because they have been so well 
read for over 100 years, a huge 
□umber of the volumes need 
conservation and re-binding. Here 
in Manchester, the early industrial 
pollution meant that acidity in the 
air made the paper very brittle. 

“We remove the binding, then 
wash each page separately in a 
special solution that cancels out 
the acidity. It's a slow process. 
Straightforward jobs we send out, 
difficult restoration we do here.” 

The largest and most famous of 
the group is the Londoa Library', 
in St James’s Square, with one 
million volumes. The Highgate 
Literary and Scientific Institution 
has internationally famous collec¬ 
tions of Samuel Coleridge. John 
Betjeman and of London history. 

In Belfast, the Linen Hall 
Library, operating from a former 
linen warehouse, has an impres¬ 
sive Irish and local-studies collec¬ 
tion and publishes a literary 
quarterly. The Linen Hall Review. 

The Leeds Library, founded in 
1768. is the oldest in the associ¬ 
ation and is now sited in an 1808 
classical building. Tavistock 
Subscription Library is the small¬ 
est, housed in a restored medieval 
abbey gateway with just 1,500 
books. 

In Nottingham the Subscription 
Library is in a 1752 rownhouse 
enclosed by a walled garden, in 
Penzance it is set in 3.5 acres of 


semi-tropical gardens. The Devon 
and Exeter Institution, in Exeter, 
has a mass of books, newspapers 
and maps relating to the south¬ 
west. 

Amenities at the Birmingham 
and Midlands Institute range from 
a theatre seating 300 to facilities 
for art exhibitions and banquets. 
Jn Newcastle upon Tyne, the 
Literary and Philosophical Soci¬ 
ety’, founded in 1793, is home to 
140.000 books, many of them old 
and rare, but much of the stock in 
Plymouth Proprietorial Library 
was destroyed during the blitz.' 
along with its original elegant 
building. The collection has been 
re-built and re-housed. 

Manchester's Portico Library is 
housed in a Georgian building 
with a domed and pillared in¬ 
terior. containing 25,000 books, 
mainly 19th century. Members 
can still dine in the reading room. 

There is particular pride in the 
collection of firai editions by- 
Elizabeth GaskelL the Manchester 
novelist, whose husband William 
was chairman of the Portico for 
more than 30 years. Mrs Allan 
says: “The public library service is 
becoming rundown, some librar¬ 
ies shutting on certain days during 
the week and most unable to 
afford as many books. More 
people are becoming aware of us 
and wc will be campaigning for 
further financial help. 

“Although we are still under 
threat, there is now a far better 
chance of our surviving to look 
after both the libraries and all 
those beautiful books, many of 
which are the only copies existing 
in public collections outside the 
British Library.” 

Bernard Silk 


IF you feel like a grand weekend, a 
stay in an Italian villa, or simply 
the pleasure of entertaining over¬ 
night guests at home without rhe 
stress of organising and catering, 
Selby’s, a small company which 
specialises in weekend house- 
parties. can arrange it all for you. 

Selby’s will rent a suitable 
manor house or French chateau, 
or its staff will slip quietly into 
your home, providing everything 
from meals and wine to cutlery 
and crockery to make your week¬ 
end as easy as possible." 

James Willing, aged 30 (Selby is 
his middle name), founded the 
company two-and-a-half years ago 
and has seen it grow from a one- 
man operation, in which he played 
cook, butler and housekeeper "for 
the weekend in other people’s 
homes, to a sophisticated business 
offering elaborate theme panics 
and weekends abroad. 

Planning parties for private and 
corporate diems forms a substan¬ 
tial part of the business, but Mr 
Willing, a former assistant man¬ 
ager af Prue Leith's outside cater¬ 
ing division. Leith's Good Food, 
says it is the organisation of 
private weekends which gives the 
company a specialist niche in the 
market. 


JOHN MANNING 



From the moment Selby’s arrives 
(in the shape of Mr Willing or. 
more often these days, one of his 
two partners. Gare Burrows or 
David Rich) there arc seemed 
soaps in the bathrooms and fresh 
flowers on the tables. 

“I used to kill myself doing 
everything on my own.” Mr 
Willing admits. “But now we 
always lake at least two people, 
because you can’t produce really 
wonderful meals and do all the 


Table manners: 


cleaning and tidying and other 
preparation yourself.” 

If the weekend staff cannot be 
accommodated on site, they will 
find lodgings nearby and return at 
7am on Saturday morning with 
the day’s newspapers, ready to 
serve a traditional English break¬ 
fast, or an American breakfast 
with blueberry pancakes and ma¬ 
ple syrup, or even, scrambled ess 
with caviar and brioches. 


Then they will pack you and- 
your guests off with a picnic lunch 

of ^ as chicken 

andleek tarts, salads, cheeses and 
breads, and you will come home to 
dinner - whether it's just a simple 

R ^ a P* e fitted 

wth fruit from your own orchard, 

elaborate!'"" 8 mUch 

“It’s up to the client to decide 
what they want, and 


suggestions,” says .Mr Willing.. .f 

Advance meetings, with clients 
will establish, whether there is 
suitable china and cutlery avail¬ 
able. or whether it needs to be 

brought, together . wiihr <tiber 
specialist supplies, such as Mr 
Willing’s favourite sent'of un¬ 
pasteurised farmhouse cheese 
from a London supplier. He will 
make use of local produce wher¬ 
ever possible: 

“We’ve started renting one 
manor - house, quite regularly, 
Passenham Manor m North¬ 
amptonshire, a ten-bedroom 
house overlooking a lake,” says 
Mr Willing. “There we charge 
£3,000 for a .weekend for eight 
people, including wines and 
food.” 

If Selby’s cpmes to your house 
the twice will vary depending upon 
what equipment, needs to be 
provided, and what travelling and 
- accommodation expenses are in¬ 
volved. However, Mr Willing 
esnmaite that the price wfl] work 
outat about £250 per person -per 
weekend, all inclusive. ™ 

if s not just rich people 
who hire us,” he emphasises. It 
canbe someone splashing out fora 
special bmhday party or ^ 
mg«eisuy cetebrauoD, or at 

eff ? rt ^ . un P rass a particular 
group of friends. 

. 5S 1 ® 1 and maids can be pro, 

E** 1 ^«*»]? held in 

*?™al occasio^ 

and Mr Wdhng has a nannj ^J 
for m0re infonna, an^°. 


Victoria McKee 


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tjicsr lavounte bt 
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nude from grcai 
and the Minting 
til Ota 

-malachite" fire 

jnanv tnompp’* & 

pons, like the :: 
-ttooden" roast 
icallv painted p*J 
“In tbc perro 
house was b-- 
fakes, so why sne 
i of these thing? *‘ 
f tn people cl w. 
wise,” Mrs Jacks 
The dramatic 
Mrs Jackson m 
down io 
“strong ideas"- 
— about what he 
to great lengths i 
create iL “I just 
aid tend the vej 
for her. the! 
from the whir*® 
fife the rest of ti 
can p:ay . 
accompany he? i 


Fly 

off 


tanj 


YOU k 
birds o 
ihoughl 
return© 
with m 
shatters 
Birth 
what fi 
for. Tn 
things 


Country 


THIS WEI 


• s iathe^ at 
d , a > . 

dispiavs. s 
raffia 
r . l 'Eaite and 

,un liiirand v 
hjrNjVit. 

He 

l^-.hrr , 
’4it:nt \t ,Vr tty 

• "a*k nit] 
,rj ^r o‘ the ; 

^s, in so, 

^enooks. 




Family ( 








15 


Home from homo- 
Caroline Jackson 

G arojfa* Jackson, the 

C^orauve MEP for 
Wiltshire, says she 
sometimes feels as if she 
. at Heathrow Air- 

wxt She flys to Brussels, where 
she rents a one-room flat at least 
i.twice a month' for committee 

804 *** ® « hotel in 
Strasbomg during the one week 
month that the European 
Parliament sits. *wemu 

She also shares a xwo- 
bedroomed Victorian flat in West¬ 
minster with her husband Robert 
Jackson, the Conservative MP for 
wantage who until recently was 
the minister for higher education 
and, science and was 
employment minister in the last 
reshuffle. There she spends the 
weekdays when she is in England 
and maintains what she considers 
a vital office and political base. 

Almost every weekend - and 
during parliamentary recesses — 
she escapes to the calm of a retreat 
the couple have established over 
the past six years in the Oxford¬ 
shire countryside where their 
constituencies overlap. 

“Everything here is lake,” says 
the MEP who is the enviro nme nt 
and consumer protection repre¬ 
sentative in the Comervative 
group. The murals in the circular 
reception hall and the dining ro om 
of the 18th-century building are 
what might be termed “nouveau 
neo-classicaT, painted by a friend 
to include the Jackson's cat and 
their favourite birds and flowers. 

The statues which adorn every 
nook and table are from monkls- 
znade from great classical works 
and the paintings are unabashed 
copies of Old Masters. The 
“malachite** fireplace is one of 
many trompe-l'oeil paintwork illu¬ 
sions, like the intricately carved 
“wooden** mantelpiece which is 
really painted plaster. 

“In the period in which the . 
house was built everyone had 
fakes, so why shouldn't we? None 
of these things would be available 
to people of our means other¬ 
wise,** Mcs Jackson says. 

The dramatic interior design, 
Mrs Jackson makes dear, is all. 
down to her husband, who has 
“strong ideas**—and ordinal Ones 
—about what he wants and willgo 
to great lengths to seek it out or to 
create it. “I just live in it. enjoy it 
and tend the vegetable garden.” 

For her, the house is a cocoon 
from the whirlwind which is her 
life the rest of the week. Here she 
can play the: grand piano to 
accompany her h usbandfe sfflgiafr 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Weekend Living: Out of Town 

to country calm 


ALAN WELLER 


off at a 
tangent 

YOU know where you are with 
birds of prey. At least, I always 
thought so. But I have just 
returned from my hols in Africa 
with my frith in their reliability 
shattered. - • . 

Birds of prey are fliers; that is 
what they are supremely adapted 
for. They fly about and drop on 
things from above: a straight¬ 
forward and rather satisfying way 
of making a living. 

Different birds of prey do it m 
slightly diflferefat ways. Peregrines 
crash on to flying birds; kestrels 
hover and drop like shuttlecocks. 
Vultures soar and alight on car¬ 
rion; ospreys and fish eagles 
pounce on fish. The snake eagles 

of Africa have cornered the snakey 

end of the market and eat little 
else; they have evolved scaky legs 
as protection from bites, and 
poisonous and non-poisonous 
snakes are alike to them. 

In England, the marsh harrier 
quarters the reed beds on wings 
lifted in a shallow V and drops on 
its prey from, above. So, when I 
saw a lypical harrier overfly Lake 
Kariba on the Zambaa/Zimbabwe 
border, I naturally assumed that it 
earned its living in the normal, 
harrier fas h ion. . 

I was in a canoe at the time, 
threading my way through a maze 
of drowned trees. Lake Kariba is 

Country events 


faring the Wars of the 
ill re-enactment group 
otic camp site showing 
pects of life in the 
s, inducting skirmishes 


House. HungeiforcL 
488 684 766). tomor- 
UOpm. £4.95, child 

sd Rtmswlck lifeboat 
rescue and combat 
Ipitfires. sideshows, 
i and games. Also a 
car nival including 
outage cats Whitby 

iv near Whitby, north 
oday from 10.30am, 
2pm, .free. 

i the warden: Guided 
suae surrounding the 

ioatcd manor house. 

is. , 

Mote, fry Hatch, 
Kent, today. Meet car 
h 12 bookable on 0732 

h day: Seaside ori- 



Farmer’s diary: Paul Heiney 

A walk on 
the wild side 


Party tridts: Caroline Jackson, MEP, is passionate about gardening and statues — most of which come from “an atelier in Brussels” 


takeiong walks in the surrounding 
countryside, and indulge her pas¬ 
sion for gardening in foe land¬ 
scaped grounds where giant busts 
of ancient goddesses glare at the 
unsuspecting from around every 
comer land, a magnificent n»v«i 
man looks down at an ornamental 
fishpond. 

“We get most of our statuary in 
. the same atelier in Brussels that 
Robot discovered when he was 
there as an MEP. and that I have 
since visited regularly.” 

The six-bedroomed country 
house (18th century with an early 
19th. century addition foot nearly 
doubles the space) gave the Jack- 
sons scope, for tiie first time, to 
~ coikci theotttsizai artefacts they 
Jove. One enormous room — 
which can cope with 200 for 
constituency parties and 100 for 
mn^y al — mnteiin th<» 


Four Moral Virtues (Justice, Pru¬ 
dence, Temperance and Forti¬ 
tude) as well as numerous other 
impressive pieces. 

“We felt it was important to 
have somewhere in the constit¬ 
uency that could be used for 
entertaining and we do quite a lot 
here,” Mrs Jackson says. “We had 
a Euro-garden party recently, and 
one day we had every level of 
government here, MEPs, MPs, 
county councillors, district coun¬ 
cillors and about 70 parish 
councillors.” 

Each of the Jacksons has a 
study; Mr Jackson is learning 
classical Greek in his. on the 
ground floor, while Mrs Jackson 
bashes out . papers on unsafe 
bathing beaches and the enforce¬ 
ment of EC legislation on food 
safety on the word- processor in 
hers on foe first floor, a room 


which she acknowledges is “the 
one place where the design of foe 
house completely collapses”. 


T he room is a jumble of 
books, papers and pic¬ 
tures of Cornwall, where 
she was brought up and 
which she still considers 
her spiritual home. 

Mrs Jackson, from Penzance, 
and Mr Jackson, from South 
Africa, met at Oxford university 
where they read history. She has 
an Oxford doctorate and was a 
Research Fellow at St Hugh’s 
College, Oxford, and he a Fellow 
at All Souls. She learned her Greek 
foe traditional way, she teases. 
“He’s trying to do it in two 
weeks.” 

The house had been a prep 
school for many years before they 
bought it and had stood derelict 


Feather report 





man-made, only 28 years old, and 
everywhere shallow enough is a 
half-submerged finest of dead 
mopane trees. 

This harrier was already famil¬ 
iar: I had seen several of its kind. It 
was the commonest bird of prey to 
be seen, apart from the fish eagles. 
It was called a gymnogene. 

I watched it fly over foe canoe 
and glide down on to one of foe 
dead trees. Then it did something' 
so bizarre that I could hardly 
believe what I was watching. It 
landed and then hugged the tree 
with its wings. Its head vanished 
inside the tree. 

Birds of prey don’t Tiug trees, I 
knew, bat that one did. The reason 

entated entertainments including 
donkey rides, kite-flying, downs 
and Punch and Judy. 

Coughton Court, bear Alccstcr. 
Warwickshire (0789 762435), to¬ 
day 2-6pm, £1, child 50p 

• Rjdtflesden revels day: Family 
entertainment includes period 
music and. dancing, children’s 
shows and games, demonstrations 
of embroidery and spinning. 

East Riddlestone Hail, Bradford 
Road, Keighley, west Yorkshire 
(0535 607075), tomorrow, 12noon 
to 5pm, £1.80, child 90p. 

• Family weekend: Events for all 
ages based'on the theme of nature 
conservation, and traditional 
beach activities. ■ 

Dunwich Heath, Dunwich, 
Saxmundham. Suffolk (072 873 
505). today, tomorrow 1 lam-5 pm, 
free, carparicll. 

• Fold's jig; Medieval funnery, 
music and blher period 
entertainment. 

ErdlggHall, near Wrcxton. Clnyd 
(0798 355 314). today from 1pm. 
Smalt admission charge. 

• Wrest Park summers tage: The 
London Mozart Players', with a 
romantic conceit including Han- 


wby it did so opens the great 
Pandora’s Box of evolution—of, if 
you like, the meaning of life. 

For foe gymnogene, although a 
superb flier like all harriers, does 
hot live foe conventional harrier’s 
life. It. is a specialist tree-hugger. 
This turd has given up quartering 
die ground and dropping on prey. 
Instead, it has become a poker and 
damberer. The gymnogene lives 
on all the delightml things you can 
find in cracks and- crevices; rep¬ 
tiles, amphibians; nestlings, small 
mammals, insects and birds eggs. 
It seems to use its wings more for 
balance than for grip when it goes 
into its tree-bugging routine. 
Hole-nesting birds are a special 

del’s Water Music, Mozart’s Clari¬ 
net Concerto, Schubert’s Rondo 
forVioIins. Programme concludes 
with Handel's Music for the Royal 
Fireworks. Take a picnic, rugs. 
Wrest Park, near Silsoc. Luton. 
Bedfordshire, gates open 6pm. 
concert 7J0pm. Tickets £7.50, 
£8.50 (information and booking, 
0898202023). 

• Heavy horse working day: Sec 
Suffolk punches at work and look 

. at the many rare breeds of animals 
- cattle, sheep, goats, hens. pigs, 
ponies and horses. Also a dairy 
museum, childrens play areas, 
cream leas, free-range produce 
shop. 

Dorset Rare Breeds Centre and 
Farm Museum. Park farm. 
Shaftsbury Road, Gillingham. 
Dorset (0747 822169). tomorrow 
10am-6pm. £2. child £1.50 

• Highland bird watching: Visit 
the most popular RSPB reserve 
and you may still be able to see 
osprey nesting sites. Information 
warden on hand, public observa¬ 
tion post with video camera. 

Loch Garten, off B970 to Nethy 
Bridge, Spcyside, Highlands. This 
weekend and next (information 
031556 5624). 


delicacy and foe gymnogene has a 
strange adaptation all foe better to 
eat them with. It has extra long, 
double-jointed legs with which it 
reaches into holes, around cor¬ 
ners, and grabs the nestlings out 
one by one. It can bend 150° 
forward and 40* back, and there is 
a fair amount of lateral movement 
as well. The only hole-nester safe 
from foe gymnogene is the honi- 
biH,'which walls up its nest with 
mud as a defence. 

Gymnogenes can walk upside- 
down on branches; hang upside- 
down for ages. They are bold 
enough to grab swallow chicks 
from nests beneath foe eaves of 
houses. They have a specially 
small bead that can reach into an 
impossibly narrow crack. 

What they have done is to claim 
a vacant ecological niche. No 
other bird is capable of earning its 
living the gymnogene way. The 
bird's uniqueness is what has 
enabled it to survive and prosper. 
That is how evolution — life — 
operates: a fundamental principle 
that the gymnogene demonstrates 
to perfection. On Lake Kariba it 
prospers, I suspect, as never 
before. I have no doubt that the 
reason there are so many 
gymnogenes is because there are 
so many dead trees: millions of 
them, all of them a mass of cracks 
and crevices. No other bird can 
exploit them as well • 

With Lake Kariba. man has 
created a gymnogene heaven, and 
with it a gymnogene glut Even¬ 
tually foe mopane trees will rot 
down and disappear, and when 
that happens, the gymnogene 
numbers wQl fall away. That is 
tough on foe gymnogenes - but 
that, after all, is life is it not? 

Simon Barnes 

NEXT WEEK 

• Magic Flute: Open-air opera by 
the Beaufort Opera Company. 
Brownsea Island. Poole Harbour. 
Dorset. Mon-Sun. nightly 7.30pm. 
£6. child £3. includes ferry (tickets 
bookable on 0202 707744). 

• Landscape explorer walk: Led 
by a National Trust warden 
through a fanning landscape 
featuring conservation and natu¬ 
ral history. 

Tilberwalte, Cumbria. Wed: meet 
Tllberwaite car park, off the A593 
Ambleside-Coniston Road. 2pm. 

• Children's fonday: Kite-flying 
throughout the afternoon. Bring 
your own or buy one on site. 
Blakeney Friary Hills. Norfolk. 
Thurs 1-Spm (further information 
0263 740480) 

• Aberdnbus open evening: Ex¬ 
plore a famous South Wales 
waterfall and an important 
archaelogical site. Children must 
be accompanied by an adult. 
Aberdukus Falls. Abcrdulais.near 

Neath, West Glamorgan, Thurs 
6.30-8pm (further informaiion 
0639636674). 

JUDY FROSHAUG | 


for five. “Robert and I still wear 
the grey and red school socks that 
we found when we moved in — 
and we discovered some anxious 
revision notes stuffed in cup¬ 
boards,” Mrs Jackson says. 

Settling into the country house 
for the summer is as good as a 
holiday, she says. “We don't feel 
the need to go anywhere else — 
although we have just returned 
from Cornwall, where I took some 
wonderful walks.” 

Normally life for Mrs Jackson is 
“rather like being in the com¬ 
mandos, with a suitcase always 
packed”, she says, “white knickers 
for London, coloured for the 
country, embroidery for foe 
plane.” 

She regards her home as an oasis 
of tranquility. “It’s always a great 
relief to get back. 1 wouldn’t ever 
want to move from here ” 


THE wildlife of Suffolk is crying 
out in unison: “Juliet, Juliet, 
wherefore art foou Juliet?" In this 
intensive fanning area, the wild¬ 
life firmly believes that she is one 
of their few friends. And Juliet 
Hawkins, young and lovely, re¬ 
turns their devotion. She is our 
Farming and Wildlife Advisory 
Group, known less romantically 
as FWAG. Each county has one, 
paid for with a species-rich mix¬ 
ture of cash: conscience money 
from the agro-chemical industry, a 
grant from foe Countryside Com¬ 
mission and others, and old- 
fasbioned fund-raising. Last 
weekend, foe Suffolk branch held 
a hog roast: foe pig presumably 
happy to make the 
ultimate sacrifice 
to help his compat¬ 
riots down in the 
green verges. 

Ms Hawkins's 
job is to move foe 
birds and bees , 

slightly higher up £ 

the farmer’s list of . \Jjk 
priorities. Since \l £ 
this is a county 
where one small- 
holder was recently 
asked to restrict SHI 
foe movements of WImT 
his pet duck as it vtuftlU Pe 
was threatening A'llul'il l pf 
the neighbour’s llMn I 
corn crop — which ! ill JR 11/1 
totalled no less I 
than 600 acres — I frfiSvB 

would imagine 
that being a wild- s 

life adviser here is 
like cheering for Everton in the 
middle of the Liverpool crowd. 

So I asked her round. 1 thought 
that having spent foe last six 
months worrying about the soil, 
what goes into it and what might 
eventually come out of it, foe time 
was ripe to raise my eyes to a 
wider world of nature. 

Like a green tornado, Ms Haw¬ 
kins swept around the farm, her 
eyes scanning ditches, hedges and 
verges with foe enthusiasm of 
Patrick Moore discovering a black 
hole. She dismissed our hedge as 
being “quite recent" (only a 
couple of centuries old) but was 
thrilled by our pollarded elms, 
which she said were sure to denote 
ancient boundaries. 

At the old meadow foe thrills 
came fast and furious as each tuft 
of rough grass was declared to be 
home to foe most special of 
butterflies. Pity. I’ve been promis¬ 
ing myself for weeks to tidy that 
mess. I started to steer foe 
conversation round to what I 


hoped was going to be a lucrative 
discussion about how a few pots of 
gold might drift our way to replace 
our ripped-out hedges. But there 
was no peace. Ms Hawkins had 
seen a huge bird. She declared it to 
be a marsh harrier. 1 bad thought It 
was a seagull. 

FWAG has done great work in 
this county in persuading farmers 
that even if you factory-farm, you 
can always find room for the wild 
side of life. But foe public have as 
much to learn as foe farmers. Take 
my 200-year-old hedge, of which I 
am rather fond. It is largely spiky 
blackthorn to dissuade stock from 
barging through it, and over foe 
years a wealth of wild roses has 
twined into it. 

When 1 asked how 

best to care for it. I 
j \ was advised “to 
l I cut it down to 
^>{-gg£^Y within four inches 
of the ground". A 
« conservationist 
Wy calls it coppicing 
'B I w and can get away 
fij \ with such behav- 
jour a casual ob- 
server might call it 
■* *y vandalism. In fact, 
Mv./y. Hawkins told 

“ Sjl# i, me of an °Id man 
\ y who, complete 
tnJil hedger’s ira- 

u ditional tools, was 
S doing a splendid 

job of coppicing a. 
farm hedge. He 

gave up when too 
'JSc. many tourists ac¬ 
cused him of 

b lighting foe countryside. 

I certainly foresee problems 
with our pond. It nestles id a quiet 
corner of an old meadow- and 
though now overgrown, with a 
little loving care and foe help of a 
great big digger it could become 
our premier wildlife haven — 
providing I keep foe ducks off it- 
Ducks, it seems, kill foe insects, 
frogs and toads and erode the 
banks with their coarse, unselec- 
tive webbed feet “Encourage the 
moorhens, but not foe ducks,” she 
warned me. This is all very well, 
but how do i explain to foe 
uninformed and foe children that 
I’m shooing foe pretty little ducks 
away in the name of nature? Poor 
ducks. And poor me, for doesn't 
that put me in foe same miserable 
class as the barley-baron who 
ordered foe lone duck off his land? 
Problems, problems. Nobody 
could be keener than me to fill up 
every inch of his hedges with 
wildlife, but the course of true love 
never did run smooth. 


Breeding 


Toys on four legs 


“WELCOME to Toy Town” says 
a minute sign, entirely appro¬ 
priately for the Lilliputian world 
of Toyhorse International, the 
Sussex stud where Tikki Adorian’s 
British-bred Miniature Horses 
reign supreme. 

The newest arrival is a week-old 
colt, 18in high, whose mother. 
Lucky Gem—a skewbald, or pinto 
in American terminology — looms 
over her foal by iGin. The 
American influence is strong, 
since foe American Miniature 
Horse Association is the only 
registry dealing with true min¬ 
iatures of 34in and under. 

This year marks the silver 
jubilee of Mrs Adorian’s stud. She 
has been a miniatures enthusiast 
since she learnt to ride on a 
miniature Shetland pony at foe 
age of three. “That was 45 years 
ago, on foe downs at Arundel, and 
my younger sister rode a donkey," 
she said. “My fascination with 
miniatures simply never stopped 
growing.” 

She did not set out to breed 
them. “It all started with 
Hurtwood Romany, who was 
bought as a peL" He was followed 
by Edwina. and from foe two pure 
breeds came a Jong line of 
miniature horses. 

NOW Toyhorse International is 
probably "the largest stud of its 
kind in Europe, currently selling 
80 to 100 foals a year. “It’s rather 
fun to know that the Toyhorse 
prefix is known world-wide,” Mrs 
Adorian says. At the stud's first 
production sale last year. 50 
miniature horses were auctioned. 
The second annual sale will take 
place on October 20, when Mrs 
Adorian hopes to set a new record. 
Her Toyhorse Treacle sold in 1988 
for 520,000, which is the current 
record price for a Shetland pony. 

At this year’s sale, prices are 
likely to start at around 450 
guineas. “Our prices are nothing 
by American standards.” says Mrs 
Adorian. who has many American 
customers. “There, an American 
miniature horse recently fetched 
$150,000 in Texas. 

Through the Shetland Pony 
Stud Book Society, the pedigree 
reaches back as far as 1870. “The 
Americans have some veiy fine 
ones, but mine are 100 per cent 
British Miniatures.” Mrs Adorian 
says. It is important to know foal 
American and British ways of 
measuring can differ, she adds; 
“in Britain we measure from the 
wither bone, while the American 
measurement is from the base of 
the mane.” 

Miniatures of any colour are 
accepted for the international 
registry, and all colours other than 
spots are included in the Shetland 
registry. Miniature Shetlands also 
register at under 34in. 

Miniature horses should be 
treated like any others when it 
comes to feeding and stabling. 


JOHN WILLIAMS 



Small equine wooden Tikki Adorian with one of her miniature horses 


Daily exercise need take no more 
than ten minutes a day. And 
miniature horses have a great deal 
of character. “They cause a lot of 
amusement and no two are ever 
the same ” says Mrs Adorian, who 
runs her business with five stud 
assistant trainees. 

In America, miniature horses 
are rarely ridden, instead they are 
used for carriage driving. “But 
they are fine for a child learning to 
ride and they make wonderful 
pets. Some you would hardly need 
to break to put a child on top. Of 
course, it all depends on character, 
as with any other horse.” 

Mrs Adorian also runs carriage 
driving courses each September 
and October. "We drive singles, 
pairs, tandems, fours or what¬ 
ever,” she says. At the end of this 
month she is travelling to America 
for foe annual miniature horses 
show in Oklahoma City. She likes 
to keep up lo date because 
fashions can change in miniature 
horses even if, superficially, there 
may not seem much scope for 
variation. “The most popular 
miniatures right now are the more 
elegant, and I have used Welsh 
mountain ponies in some to give 


more refined animals," she says. 

Refined miniature horses are 
fine boned, incorporating the 
“draft” type into the overall 
elegant little horse. The breed 
objective is foe smallest possible 
perfect horse, featuring symmetry, 
strength, agility and alertness. 
Manes and tails are lustrous and 
silky. One of the s:ud sires, 
Toyhorse Alpine Boy, which 
stands at 30‘*in, is a white/grev 
pinto who carries his head lightly, 
typifying the refined type of 
miniature horse. 

After this October's sale the stud 
numbers will revert to their 
customary winter quota of about 
220 , but private sales take place all 
year round. Buyers often arrive 
without warning from as far afield 
as Australia, apparently un¬ 
deleted by travelling and quar¬ 
antine costs amounting to about 
£2.000 for each miniature horse. 

Sandy Bisp 

• Toyhorse International is holding 
an open day on September 2, which is 
exported to draw 4.000 visitor*. For 
further infonnaiior. contact the stud 
at Hawick Farm. The Haven. 
BiUingshurst. West Sussex RHI4 
9SQ (04U372 2oJyj. 























6 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


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THE TIMES 


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tes fof 

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Priey e 




HIE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Weekend Living: Collecting 


g to spout about 


rr k 


7 



HUGH WHITE 





m 





Take a leaf from 
the illustrators 

If 19th century drawings are too expensive, 
then turn the page back 100 years 










Have fim with tbeteftset: (clockwise from top left) fish teapot, £2499, from Presents, 129 Sloane Square, London SW1; 
tea-time teapot, £39^5, Liberty^ shell teapti,£39-95, Liberty; RosenthaTs art deco-«tyk teapot, £65^40 from liberty; 
SBBiBicr limn teapot by Annie Doherty, £95, from liberty; rose teapot by Mary Rose Young, £150, from Liberty 

ASSCtS lurid pinks and gold-rimmed digger, and a menagerie of ani- The Tea 



H undreds of teapots, * and America! 
many of than eccen- on sale, along 
trie, are being gathered tea cosies, line 
in London for a two- A tea shop sell 
month exhibition. The for shoppers 
display indrife designer one-offi. Mad Hatter’s i 
traditional and contemporary, draw children 
pots, cops /and tea-associated liberty’s m 
accessories, - 

! The exhibition at .Liberty’s,purple. ancL c 
Regent Sheet, from August' 17, itec6rts, 7 '*nd 
afro fi a t m es:. pieces-from the emmentgrowe 
Spode, Wedgwod andL Royal ..Migc.3he.Ji 
Worcester rnmmirn, which ace T3*rjeefing.:pu 
oat for sale rawf 

flpimfnt ftf lTHfriw . -r-floitfliOfa 

. There is, loo, a oolkctitm of aciddy, £3.95 
mote than a hundred teapots - bagsin acaddy 
commissioned from British pat- afjooseteain 
tera, including one in the shape of / Anyone into 
the Liberty bmkting (£60, byKatic adding toatea: 
Bunnell). visit BcQexnan 

Other teapots include cofouifol 43 Elizabeth S 
Italian versions shaped Idee fruit (071-730 50* 
and vegetables, classic Oriental Garden Marke 
teapots m cast iron, blue and white London SWll 
ceramics, and Yix Xing-ware and in Bright 
(plain terracotta pots in unusual bury. Winches 
shapes) much sought after in the AO stock* seb 

Far FaV nnnqial rfiapw 

Kitsch British bone china in houses, parkin] 


lurid pinks and gold-rimmed 
purples, snapped up by Japanese 
and American collectors, is also 
on sale, along with Liberty print 
tea cosies, linens, teas* and cloths. 
A tea shop sells a variety of brews 
for shoppers to sample, while a 
Mad Harter’s tea party is likely to 
draw children of all ages. - 

" Liberty’s new own-Iabd tea is 
d 9 tmctiYej^ packaged in snip ed 
purple .and cream and 

padeets/and comes from the 
eminent growers, WHKamsonand 
Magpc. ifte frve Mends —.pure 
Assam,’ English 
-fficak&st; Sari -Grey and jasmine, 
—cost £340 fin 125g sold loose in 
a ciddy, £3.95 for 125g sold as 50 
bagsinacaddy, and £1.75 for 125g 
of Jbose tea in a packet. 

- Anyone interested in starting or 
adding to a teapot collection could 
visit Betjeman & Barton’s shops at 
43 Elizabeth! Street, London SW1 
(071-730 . 5085) and Chelsea 
Garden Market, Chelsea Harbour, 
London SWI0 (071-823 3273), 
and in Brighten, Oxford, Salis¬ 
bury, Winchester and Windsor. 
AO stock a selection of teapots in 

houses, parking metersandaKIB 


digger, a»d a menagerie of ani¬ 
mals. 

The non profit-making Tea 
Council, Sir John Lyon House, 5 
High Timber Street, London 
EC4V3NJ (071-2481024) runs an 
information service giving advice 
about Miying and drinking special¬ 
ist teas (send two 20p stamps for 
leaflets). It can provide clubs or 
groups with lec tur er s and a free 
video/slide, along with a lea 
tasting of eight varieties. The 
council also runs a mail order 
service for novelty teapots, some 
of which are exclusive, and or¬ 
ganizes the Top -Tea Place award. 
Last year’s winner was The Ca¬ 
nary, Queen Street, Bath. 

For gadgetry associated with 
brewing up — including silver- 
plated tea infuser spoons (£7.50), 
chrome kettle-shaped infusers 
(£2.45), animal tea cosies (£7.15) 
and lidded mugs (£4.40) head fora 
branch of the Tea House, at 15a 
Neal Street, London WC2 (071- 
240 7539 Y, 7 Shreeve Walk, Sheep 
Street, Stratford-upon-Avon (0789 
414038); 9 Golden Gross, Oxford 
(0865 728838); and 3 Fish Row, 
Salisbury, Wiltshire (0722 
334227). 


The Tea House branches are 
holding special tastings of apple 
with cinnam on, tropical fruit with 
coconut and Russian tea on 
August 24 and 31. Unusual teas 
available for tasting on request 
include black China tea, flavoured 
naturally with husks or essence of 
fruits and flowers, and banana, 
blackberry and mint t eas . 

. St James’s decaffeinated tea is 
said to contain less than a tenth of 
the caffeine found in an average 
cup of tea. De-caff is particularly 
sought-after by people suffering 
from 'high blood pressure, mi¬ 


graines. stomach disorders.' skin 
allergies and insomnia. Packs of 
80 tea bags are available by mail 
order at £3.15 inc p&p (minimum 
order two packs) from St James's 
Teas Ltd, Sir John Lyon House. 5 
Upper Thames Street, London 
EC4V3PA (071-248 4117). 

And Milford of London has 
introduced environment-friendly 
unbleached tea bags for its three 
most popular herbal teas, avail¬ 
able from leading health food 
shops at £1.65 per box of 50. 

Nicole Swengley 


S hould you wish to obtain an 
original E.H. Shepard 
“Pooh" drawing or a rabbity 
Beatrix Potter watercolour for the 
nursery wall it would cost you an 
arm and several legs. The great 
illustrators of the turn of the 
century, Du lac. Rack ham. Heath 
Robinson and the rest, have long 
been beyond almost all reasonable 
’sacrifice. 

The Chris Beetles Gallery in St 
James's. London, holds regular 
exhibitions of the work of book 
illustrators, both adult and juven¬ 
ile. It is noticeable, however, that 
while Beetles and fellow enthu¬ 
siasts have done much to boost the 
market in illustrators working 
from the middle of the last century 
to date, their 18th- 
century forerun¬ 
ners have moistly 
been ignored. 

About 4.000 good 
impressions could 
be taken from a 
copper plate, but 
the introduction of 
steel by Albert 
Warren in about 
IS22 meant that 
editions of up to 
30.000 became 
possible. It was English ilia 
thus worth the 
publishers’ while to commission 
fewer original drawings from 
comparatively expensive artists. 

However, the illustrators of the 
previous generation were im¬ 
mensely prolific. Thomas 
Stothard (1755-1834) is said to 
have made more than 5.000 
drawings for books, and over 
1.000 in more than 100 books 
have been counted for Samuel 
Wale (1721-1786). 

Serious book illustration in 
England may be said to have 
begun in 1677 with the establish¬ 
ment of the Tonsons' publishing 
business at the sign of the Judges 
Head in Chancery Lane. Eleven 
years later they produced a Para¬ 
dise Lost with plates after 
J.B. Medina, followed in 1709 by 
an edition of Shakespeare illus¬ 
trated by J.P. Boitard. and Mil¬ 
ton's works by Louis Cheron in 
1720. Other French or Huguenot 
artists working for London 
publishers included H.F. Gravelot 
and J.B.C. Chaielain. 

Many of the engravers were also 
French, and it was only in the 
middle of the century with Francis 
Haymans work for Fables of the 


ft 


English illustration, 1808 


ANTIQUES AND COLLECTING 


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Female Sex, 1744, that a “homely 
touch of local genre" was in¬ 
troduced to the French manner. 

Hayman (1708-1776), a friend 
of Hoganh, a collaborator of 
Gravelot and an influence on 
Gainsborough, was very active as 
an illustrator from the 1740s to the 
1770s, working in Indian ink and 
sepia washes. There an? some 
spirited drawings for Don Quixote 
in the British Museum. 

For a perfect match with text 
there can be little to compete with 
the drawings which Gilbert White 
commissioned from the Swiss* 
bom Samuel Hieronymus Grimm 
11733-1794) for the Natural His¬ 
tory of Sdbomc. 1776, although 
for charm the Shakespearean 
scenes of the 
equally splendidly 
named Yorkshire- 
man Julius Caeser 
ibbetson (1759- 
1S17) come close. 
Charm and ele¬ 
gance are also 
Samuel Wale's 
hallmarks, even 
when he is Idling 
sensational or 
moral tales from 
the S'ewgatc Cal- 
ration, 1808 endar. The pre¬ 
dominant styles of 
the latter part of the 18th century 
and the first decades of the 19th 
were the elegant rococo, typified 
by E.F. Bumey (1760-1848). and 
ihe dramatic neo-classical. The 
latter, of which the best-known 
(but not necessarily the best) 
practitioner was William Blake, 
can often be splendidly ridiculous 
to a modem eye. 

Stothard (£230-£1,500) worked 
felicitously in both manners, as 
did Richard Courbold (1757- 
1831, £185 to £250), but if you 
cannot afford Blake or Fuseli, then 
for a fraction of their prices you 
can acquire a piece of muscular 
drama by Richard Westall (£240 
to £450), a fellow master of the 
rising eyebrow and flared nostril. 
Indeed, pleasant drawings and 
watercolours by almost all the 
men mentioned here can be had 
for £300 or less, although their 
best is likely to be considerably, 
more. 

A good place to begin is Abbott 
& Holder in Museum Street, 
London WCI. whose summer sale 
ends on Monday. 

HUON Mallaueu 


S Jtarn jfull Si 
Sofas; 3nto Cfjarc* 



«*** * wkimhiB **** m Shropshire 


GRAHAM Nicholson, who gave 
up a mar keting career in hfe early 
forties to become a bookbinder, 
recalls a customer who burst into 
lean when he took her favourite 
book of childhood verse back to 
her- . . 

■ “The book had been read to ray 
client by her mother, and she had 
read it to her children. Now the 
time had come to read it to her 
gran dchildre n. Books which mean 
something to individuals can be 
far m ore important t han those in 
the market for profit.” he says. 

After a year’s fuH-time course at 
the London College of Printing at 
Clerkenwell, Mr Nicholson 
moved from Hertfordshire to a 
remote cottage m Shropshire, 
where he built a bindery m the 
gasden. There he can now be 
found at work, restoring oW 
volumes, and housing new works 
in fine bindings of richly cojonred 
goatskins and English 
His charge for restoring and 
rebindinga small book is approxi¬ 
mately £40. 

Mr Nicholson's worksfey con¬ 
tains a variety of pressesand small 

tools which he uses for 


lion. The traditional design of his 

sewing frame is the same as those 

used by 12th-century nronks. 

1 “Everything should be revers¬ 
ible in bookbinding,” be explains- 


Between 

the 

covers 


to its constituent parts.” Some 
modem glues make this impos¬ 
sible and th er e for e, instead of 
using polyvinyl acetates, Mr 
Nicholson uses traditional hot 
glne. 

He says the problem with 
modem books is largely modem 
paper, which tends to be add and 
not made for long life. In America 
concern has been expressed about 
volumes in the library of Con¬ 
gress. “There is a movement 
gaining ground there for books to 
be printed on add-free paper” Mr 
Nicholson says. “Authors have 
leamt wife a shodrthat, instead of 
earning their place in posterity, 
when their works are taken down 
from the shelves 40 years after 
their deaths, only dust may re¬ 
main between the covers.” 

Mr Nicholson ensures his own 
cleaning and treatment methods 
are pure-by obtaining ingredients 
from a chemist and mixing them 
to traditional recipes to produce 


SITES’lo^do .Mto; d ^' n f i '° f be “T 

JL.w t^.Ame.tooteitbacIf wx, aaSjdtous lanolin aid 


neafs-foot oil, a lubricant oil 
obtained by boiling cattle bones. 
When cleaning a book he intends 
not to restore pristine freshness, 
which would ruin its provenance, 
but to tidy it up and put fife back 
into the covers. 

One supplier brought him a first 
edition copy of Charles IPs diary, 
written after the Battle of Worces¬ 
ter and containing a sprig of tire 
oak in which the monarch was 
said to have hidden. “By using 
traditional boiled sweet paste, 
which is decorated and spread 
with combs and other devices, I 
was able to copy the original 
binding,” he says. 

Topographical books are the 
book-binder's stock-in-trade. Mr 
Nicholson is imbuing new life into 
Nooks and Crannies of Shropshire, 
printed in 1899, the third copy he 
has tackled. A treatise on rider- 
making indigenous to the area is 
the kind of book he often comes 
across. His more creative work 
can be seen in a volume of A 
History of the Great War, with its 
full leather binding in two colours 
featuring a raised poppy on a 
decorated centre panel. 

Sandy Bisp 

»Graham Nicholson, Bridge Cot¬ 
tage. Adlevmoor Common. 
BuckneU, Shropshire SY7 OBH 
(05474 616). The Soeiay of Book¬ 
binders and Book Restorers, Fern- 
bank, Trostoh, Petersfield. Hamp¬ 
shire GV315 ER. 


In solid oak or walnut, this 
traditional table extends to seal 
6 - 1 0 people in rnmlbn. 
Superbly era fled wnb antique 
distressed finish. 

A unique opportunity to acquire 
this practical and beautiful 
uMc. 


fFordfutm s 
Antiques (Dealers 

^KOwtSv°n,Oni, 

SfB CT146UJ, 

Eoetnd 

. Ttfc Dm lOSKl 3735*9 


For cotow leaflet 

g TTITm T^. iwtdaxiUaBBag; 

U*&. Magmas R4 
■tcac* 4 EMTwetaaiian 

TW1 IRC 

Telephone 081-8921778 

WANTED 

ANTIQUES 

Furniture. Paintings. Oriental 
Rugs, all Ceramics. Sculpture, 
Bronzes/lvonrs. glass, silver, 
garden slatuar>. also An 
Deco/Nointau etc. 
Auction estimates paid, single 
items or complete estates. Any 
distance GB. 

Miss Daries of Load on 

071-267 3342 

081-960 8988 


AmiifiH' furniture. Silur. 
/Tnwviinr I Min. Wiiii 

.laqns hm-huM'il. .VincA'/ww 
4 House Cleamea undertaken. 

I alaaxioKS far Probate & Insurance 

Open MoBday-Saturday 
9a-m.-6 turn. Evening by 
appointment 


AUSTRALIAN 

Contemporary Painting 
Geoffrey Proud 'Grey 
Lady No 7' 1980 
126anx98cm. 

Enq Australia 
062 589168. 


BILLIARD TABLES 

Specialist dealers tor a It sizes & 
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showrooms tor viewing in comfort 
- by ap p o in tment please. 
Details ssnL InstaUsrion/w^crt 
ACADEMY ANTIQUES 
BYFLEET (0932 352067) 





























A* 


-10 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


071-481 1920 


071-481 1920 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


7>u5*SaiM«| 

taea Gftcnm [ 




■■■■ CHJEEN ELIZABETH HALL HHM 

Sjjt 5** FltlfSICM. THEATRC "H Only .. "'jl (veer rwoorer M BU' 
San IZ (Sr^ua & tortefcm5 w*Da tv/ itw.r tw pmmcruni D»m »*wi"re c' 
•og MwwhDTOMBn' jna woks a ftirsteroiiMoihfcmw itk* par> cw lues 
'•* 5 W*. iot..-ra<ns M n*i8miw. araint WVN O'® v& t 

asomdiniBtin'wirM.xar^mh'fcnfvnfnft.-wMttiranalitn'Ufiaa. 
7> OTJv ‘ is 3eJ ip at# irw .ianw py «m 

E’Q W.CS.1M.50 Dvb Pnvsci) Ttw jib The SounGLVtt Cwi 


Royal Albert Hall 20 July-IS September 

0N1GHT7.3Q BBC SYMratWY ORCHESTRA 

es&2£&* whM 


TONIGHT 7 JP 
AN DREW PAMS . 
STEPHEN HOUGH 

050 ONLY _ 

TOTDRKOW7.3Q S KI 
MATTHIAS BWAEKT 
JOANNA MACGREGOR 
Q.tt. £3.5*1 ONLY 
MON 6 AUG 6.00 



rl barbican hall 


, -m - ' 07t-.A3es4?J ■ 9 am _ 8pm Daily 

I J • OWKTX *-*C*ri WP MAWAOftC-i'- - W 


COLLINS CLASSICS 
LSO SUMMER POPS 2.m AUGUST 


S^SSUSS 0reh ^- G ^ 


BY POPULAR OCMAND! 

OLYVER GYPSY ENSEMBLE 

return toSt Marl in-in-ihe- Fwli-. Trafalgar Square. Lundon WC2 

-4 GYPSY CARNIVAL 

"Stunaing...the thrill of the iwrifc" {Independent} 

SATURDAY IS AUGUST at 7.3iipm 

A vibrant entertainment retreating the romantic 
si>und »»f gypsy muric 

Tickets LS.oO (ivivei & Cn.nl) (restricted rim) 
Telephone DTl-Soi* 1930 (credit cards only! 


ESA-PEKKA SALONEN 
g. i&. ojn only 
TISES7AUG7J« 
ESA-PEKKA SALONEN 
HA-MARIE NILSSON 


SS3&S Tio.j wdmBi 

Svmph>inp V 1 ^ mP _ - _SfB ELJLS 

KXL YOUTH ORCHESTRA O P GREAT RTTAIN 

ui- 

i\|m rji rirh /irifhip STRAUKd 

-DAVTOTTITERINCTOT 

SWEDISH RADIOSVHlTiONY ORCHESTRA 
Snnplmav Sii.' MAHLER 1 


TjOpm A nas»mc k»* a! me sorae-i wsn twourtr 
Beer** S?:Dii Vrewony. Hve ~ 


S£5tS3Jot| 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 
at the BARBICAN 

_ BwQflk«(CC07M3SWW __ 

WTDNESDAY 22 to SATURDAY 25 AUGUST Wraito8G*7.45 1 Stti.7.30»S«*»=« 3 -*» 

rOUU^SSffioNLV „ D^CTFROMSFAIN 

JESUS CHRIST PACO PENA 
SUPERSTAR & HIS FLAMENCO 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSERpreaeat* 
gt the BARBICAN 
29 AUGUST to SUN 2 aua'lEMHEBT 
W«4tB 7eB, Sub 7J0, S«*im* W» 

DIRECT FROM SPAIN 


5 US ‘*" WATON m THE OENERAL arc ONE WEEK 

7-45pm gtjei^rtJonS>iiftitoiTOnS)BOraenft^«aJ^eoixl«Wev 


SB 11 Aug WEST SIDE STOUT Contra 

OroheffiJUJiinB roMi rood CwrthMHnyiiOTManaK«i Strait 
gyi^M qTpny. Wdi fete un&gwapla Bines KarS. ferity*. I Fee' ftoov 


OLLE PHlSSi-.N 
HEINRICH SCHIFF 

ra. in. r?.,yi only 

WED B AUG 7 JO 

RICHARD HICKOX MntLn Gmw - tmc . _ _ _RAVEL 

MCHQLA3 DANIEL iKwe Corner,. IALGHAN WILLIAMS 

DELLA JONES ThrEnduntra* .. .... . 

£12. Of« £fa, L3.M) ONLY iljumtcumunnU |i.uu 1 COLIN AlATrHE'fb 
EJtmj*rbmio . FALLA 

Pnyjton utt Cofia Mmhr** 6. IS, Royal CdUcffc tri Mask, Prince Coc&on ■ 


SWEDISH RADIO SYMPHONY OROIESTRA 
Vilio ooNpci yrrunmU l n JAVEL 

CdliCrainio 1 VI mSSESSSSH 

Indn.UK ptan • JA.V SANTKTRnNl 

SnnpbuOrXu.J NIELSES 



7/iSpri end David Karoivn?lm«oi 

eumv iWvw and many mens. 


-THE CONCERT- 

A spedal concert presentation 
of the multi award winning musical 
by Tin Rice and Andrew JLM Webber 

featuring ibc Iniraucknwi] London West End Sum 

® DAVE WOLEITS as Jesus 

CHRISTOPHER BIGGINS as Herod 
KEITH BURNS as Judas 
JAMES SMniZE as Pilate 
FIONA HENDUE\ r as Marv Magdalene 

__ THE ACTORS CHOIR_ 

ANTHONY BOWLES Musical Dir. HUGH WOOUDS1DGE Dir. 
£850. £II>50. fTIi50. £1450. £lfi50. £1850 


ANDREW DAMS 
YURIBASHMCT 


£«■ tv. O.SO ONLY 

FWIVAUG7JB 
ALLSEATS SOLD 


liaScSiE m* EULW«t LIONEL TERTIS 
WW ROBERT SIA SoK 

iSmTCn' Nr.: BEETHOVEN 


1 henor ‘ Lo’owt' ?-fi £ 

sS 


y, COLLINS CLASSICS 

1 A\V LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA r 

m SUMMER POPS 1990 * 

^ AT THE BARBICAN HALL 



IHNtN OSCKESTKA I 


RETS AVAILABLE ON THE NIGHT ONLY 
23ft ,\rau .ELW.iwlier. tHHJB 

.-irunam u,^n *ru.v 


SATURDAY 11 AUGUST 7.4=iPM 
SUNDAY 12 AUGUST 7.30PM 


BtaCtfr^nTuawM 


“FFABWEL" 

Arthur Davison conducts hi9 farewell concert 


ST. DAVID'S HALL. CARDIFF 
on FRIDAY AUGUST 1 Bin 

TELE MESSAGE AND CARDS TO ST. DAVIS'S HALL 
“FFARWEL" 

And (fronts Arthur, for 38 years o> vour inspired musical 
teaSwsTMp. (tom members com past and present, ot the 

National Youth Orchestra of Wales 


ST. M-iRTl\- /A '-THE FIELDS 

Trafalgar Square. London HC2 

BACH ★ ALBINONI ★ MOZART 

Aprillu CJumkr Orcholm 
r'unrticluc Darid Chtnuik 
Bach Air fnjm >nire .\« :5 in D: I 'nncerto r'.ir 2 vialim 
I'achelhel C'.tmui .Alhinuni Adjd-i Mown -Symphony No-10 
FRIDAY IT AUGUST AT 7.30pm 
Ticket* £8.00 (nave) & £4 (restricted view) 
Tdepfaone 071-839 1830 (credit cards only) 


MCP Presents 


the bockm all over the years towt 


OPERA A BALLET 


Plus Spend Guests 


GLVNDC BOURNE FESTIVAL 
OPERA M-JUi 

The London PWBunruHMk 

Touv. Mon. Wed a FH 5JO 
FaMaff. Tom or at -1.60 Ctprk- 
cieh R.lurrud lickers only. Tu>: 
a Ttiii or 6 to New Year. Trek 
?N al ^nll available lor 

vmr pr^rnrmanccs For pa»i 
bV- n-tnmed titheu/ recotaeo 
Inlormalion call (07}-Siiiil. 


BERNSTEIN’S 

WEST SIDE STORY 

Complete concert performance with 

C\Tithia Ha>-mon, 

Kurt Streit, C\Tithia Buchan 

Conductor Justin Bnrnn 
SAT ! 1 AUG 10.30PM 

FREE FIREWORKS CONCERT tLiksUle Tvtr.icv) 
&»r Fnvo - Ho iil-F £10 £7 i4 
071 63S8S91 (9-^i DAILY) ccOTl Z407200 jbkgfcc) 

Two Conceits with 

PCVCHAS ZUKERMAJV 

conductor/violin 

ENGLISH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 

MONDAY 27 AUGUST 7.45PM 


SUNDAY 26 AUGUST at 730 pJB. 

SUMMER CLASSICS 

Rosstai: Thieving Mamie Overture: 
^^Johsan Straws: Thunder >k Lightning Polka; 
flffik HadiHwain w; Piano Concerto No.2; 
IStnH Bizet: Carmen Suite; Revet Bolero: 
|KS7 Vaughan Williams: Greens)eeves; 

“•a* 1 ” Elgar: Pomp Jb Circumstance March No.l 
LONDON CO NCEfilr OHCHESTHA 
MICHAEL REED cmtduaor 
AMANDA BURTON piaan 
£7.sn. £ 1 ( 1 . £f;.S(l. £|450. £1550 


SATURDAY 15 SEPTEMBER at 8 fun. 


& HIS FLAMENCO 
DANCE COMPANY 

IN A SPECTACULAR PROGRAMME 

Pbqi'. ln-miMnt fritf playing, tite hainitfeg 
Oifdnpm ami the d tttt lAliiy 
of tfee dauccrv explode Into a . •' 
talcidoacopti nfmagnincerU qnwtaigman. 
£65K) £8-S0 £10 JO £13-50 04-50 £16JO OTl-ggg^ 

WEDNESDAY 12 SEPTEMBiaKat 7M 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

ZUkaal Sympho^OadwHra ConA:JMWD COLEMAN 
Scgcaao: ROSEMARY ASHE Ten on AD RIAN MARTIN 
ROSSINI Ov. WSbazu Tell* SIBELIUS Finlandia 
DVORAK O Silver Moon, PUCCINI XcsnsxD oom, 
MASCAGNI Intcnncao CawU eria Rathana^ 
BORODIN PotovaianDimce*. VERDI Grand MarchAida* 
MVEm JOHANN STRAUSS Blue Danube, 
mU"At PUCCINI 3 Arias from La Saberne,. . 

Mil ELGAR Pomp & Circumarance March No. J. 

TCHAXKOVSKST OVBXTVUffi ‘lail* 
WITH CANNON AMD MORTAR EMHUC AS 
£6-50 £8JQ £10.50 £12^0 QA5R £ I6J0 S7I-«tSni 
gt the ROYAL FESTIVAL HA T J. 

SUNDAY 2 SEPTEMBER at 730 


BATTLE OF BRITAI N DA Y GRAND OPERA NIGHT 

National Symphony Orchctca ProMuticaChotna 



BBC CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
SIR DAVID wmCOCKS conductor 
ANN MACEAY soprano 
ROALD DAJBL guest presenter 
£8.50. £105(1. £1150. £1450. £1650 


SWINDON OASIS 

SATURDAY 1st DECEMBER 7.30 pm 

Tkfata: £1150 

k w a ibh from BIO Tri: D783-533404/S 
(Subject to a booking fee] 


l\t BIRMINGHAM 
kAl NEC /IREHtV 


STRAVINSKY: Panses Concertantes 
MOZART: Violin Concerto No 5 in A. K219 
MOZART: Symphony No 39. K543 


at the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

_ Baa Office/CC 07K928 8808 _ 

SATURDAY 8 SEPTEMBER at 738 oa 


HOOKED ON CLASSICS 


Coodoam: DAVID COLEMAN SopstascSOSEAURYASBE 
TeaacANJSONYMEE Saaxmc: JOHN CASHMORE 

F ANFAR E TR UMPETERS QFTHE RQYALMARINES 
OVERTURE BARTERED BRIDE, Gmad Cbocoi AIDA* 
Chorm of the Htfata Slave* N ASUCC O, 

Largo al Eaeiomo BARBER OF SEVILLE. . 

O Silver Mooa RUSALKA, Mediation THAIS. . 
On vrithTfaeMoikTl PACajAtX3,TXigPEARLPBHEBS» 
Toreadort Song & Chorus CARMEN* 

Che gelida maxuna. Mi chiazaano Mimi 
O BOave firacxnUa LA BOHEMEr' 
Nefitui Dorms TURANBOT, . . 
Overture MARRIAGE OF FIGARO, 

O My Beloved Father GIANNI SCHXCHHI, 
Give me your band my Maiden DON dOVANRI* - 
Polovtsian Dances PRINCE IGOR ' 


Polovtaian Dances PRINCE IGOR • 

£650£750£950 £1250£12-50£1 £50£ 1&50£L&50 IH-KSM 


HEREFORD LBSURE CENTRE 

MONDAY 3rd DECEMBER 730 pm 

Tickets; £1150 

AuBafafat fiwn B/O Tet: 0*32 271953 

pr ly personal appBaifan 
from Hereford Toorht & hdennitHin Centre and 
IWim.t Leisure Centre. Woreteter 
(Subject to a booking fee) 


TUESDAY/WEDNESDAY 
11th/12th DECBMBS 730 pm 

Tiefcets: £12501 FiOJK 
AvaiaUa from 87Q Tel: ©1-780 4133 
fSobjea to 80p par 6dnt booking foeL 
All major Qwfit Cants accepted. Or by postal 
apptoation to Status Quo B/0, P®X Bmrengham 
B401NT endawg chaque/PO made payable to 
NEC Status Quo with SAE and a>ow Sop per ticket 
booidnQ fee. Or by parsons! application from 
Wean Thaetrc. Ticfcnt Shop, tempest Records 
Bir mi ng ha m. MLM Hanley. Newcastle aid 
Wfoharh amp tow. Power Ptaca Corentry. 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 071 a2a 
88 C0 me CC 0 - 25 AUGUST 

ENGLISH NATIONAL i 
BALLET 1 

6-11 Au-llni CMrPEU* 

1S-25 4uoust SWAN UKC 


TUESDAY 28 AUGUST 7.45PM 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE 071 340 

1066/1911 Standby Info BK 
69c>3 SCC 65 OmphluroLs avail 
on the day. THE ROYAL 
BALLET Today 2.30 L 7 JO 

Ramro A MlM. SEASON ENDS 
TOfTT. AUTUMN SEASONS 
OPENS 14 SEPT 


BACH: Concerto for oboe and violin in D minor 
STRAVINSKY: Pulcinelfa Suite 
DVORAK: Romance for violin and orchestra 
SCHUBERT: Symphony No 3 in D 


Sounds, lights and spectacle with hits from 

Hooked on Gasses, Can't Stop the Classics 
and Jboraey through the Classics 
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC POPS ORCHESTRA 
Introduced & Conducted by LOUIS CLARK 


EXHIBITIONS 


Seat Prices-. & 16 S13 &10 S750 £5 


BARBICAN HALL 071-638 8891 (9?8 daily) 


BRIDLINGTON SPA 
ROYAL HALL 

TUESDAY 4th DECEMBER 730 pm 

Tidkats: £1150 

AmUfe from B/0 Tal; 02SZ-67BZ58 
(Credit Cards Accepted). Gough ft Davy HuO 
(TaL- 0482482% KuS Cry Had B/O. 
Iktatiwrld York, Pats Shafltod Cfoatharpea, 
Cum Travel Beveilay. Martin Travel Scumhorpn 
and AsMey Adame Driffield 

. [Subject to a booting fee) 


»y B/0 M an d m tar. Ow Price I 
lA»a*j« to a booting fee) 


.■<4 PETERBOROUGH MALLARD 
PARK EXHIBmON CENTRE 


BLACKPOOL OPBIA HOUSE 

WEDNESDAY 5th DECEMBER 730 pm 

Tickets: £1250, £1050 
AvaUrie from B/O Tel: 02S»77W 
and al uaoal agents (Subject to a booting fee) 


THURSDAY 13th DECBMBBi 730 pm 

Tickets: £1150 

AvaOafale from B/0 Tel: 0733^8757, Stave Jason 
Tnwd Patatfaorough. Bayes Racordfom Kings Lynn. 
4th Dimension Wisbech, Carom Travel SpskSng, 

Stamford Music Shop Stamford, United Counties 

B/O Huntingdon. Marts Records March. 
Campus Travel Cambridge &A.T. Mayas Bedford 
(Al subject to a booting foe). 

Credit Crad appfiettions Tel: 07338075 
JJ* (£1.00 per tichot booking fee) 



NEUROPE 


SAY GOOD-BYE TO 


iar vrow IRtVMtl^ "ISCI 

|£ WEMBLEY 

Wmw ancNfl 


TINA TURNER 


M SOUTH SHIELDS 
fr TEMPLE PARK CBtfTRE 

HUDAY 7th DECEMBER 730 pm 

Tickets: £1150 

AvaBable from B/D Tel: 091-4559119. 
South SWalds Tourist i nformation Centra. 

NaMcasdaOtylMB/O. VbfomaRaeonta 
Duitwn & Sundartand and KMA VMmmton 
(Sifoject to a booting fee) 


GLASGOW S.E.&C.C. 

SATURDAY 8th DECEMBER 730 pm 

rickets: £1150 

AmBeble by postal mGcation to P.O. Bos ISO, 
Head Post Office. Edfonurgfv. snefosfog chegue/PO 
made payable to TDCTA with SAE Mid allowing 
90p pet tidwt bookiog fee. Credit Card applications 
Tel: 031-557 88 (Subject to a boohing foe). Or b* 
penoiMl wfcaticm from Just The ridret. 

Lost in Music Glasgow, Vagin Records. 
Ripping Records Ejfinburgh. One Up Aberdeen. 
Groochos fkmdaa (AS Subject to a boohing fas) 


iwrniffl'M® 

MANCHESTER G-MEX CENTRE 

SUNDAY 9th DECBVIBER 730 pm 


rickets: £1250. £1000 
Available from B/0 Tel: 061-832 9000 
(Subject la 80p par ticket boating foe), 
tb forpersonal apokcatfon from G-Men Bf a 
PiocimDy B/0, Apoto Theatre B/O Manchester. 

TLCA Lheniool. Action Records Liverpool. 
King Georaes Hafl Btackburn. Vfoes Records Bury 
(Al wbjact to a booking fee) 


Via flflgflfl 

SATURDAY/SUNDAY 
15th/16th DECEMBER 730 pm 
rickets: £1250,11150 

Avakahte from Mtonbiey Arm B/0 (no booting foe) 
Tel: 081-9001294. CredS Cants accepted 
(Subjoa To £150 per tktat booting »*•). 

Or by postal appfcstiofl to Status Quo B/O. 

P.O. Box 2. London WE OEX andoting cbegae/PO i 
made payabla to MCP limited with SAE and «Bow I 
SOp per tk*« booting foe. Or by personal 

appfccatkm from Vagai Megastore Oaford Street 

Keith Prows*, rickecmasier. Premier. Stargreen, 

LTB and Albemarle |AD subject to a booting fee) 

BRIGHTON CENTRE 

MONDAY 17th DECEMBER 730 pm 

ridtets: £1250. £10.00 
AvafaMe from 00 Tel: 02792028 
(CraiSt tods accepted) and aU usual agents 
(Sifojact to a booking fee) 

ST. AUSTELL CORNWALL 
LEISUREWORLD 
WEDNESDAY 19th DECEMBB? 730 pm 

Ticfcats: £1200 

AvaBable from B/0 Tel: 072U140M. 

Rival Racorts Pfymooth. Recoids & Tapes Faknouth. 
»hd>n OBvar Badnith. So u n d ri iedi Pwawica. 

Land, Sea & Air Travel St Austal and.Trim 
and al laial agents (Afl sidijact to a booting fee) 

BOURNEMOUTH 
INTERNATIONAL CENTRE 

THURSDAY 20th DECSABER 730 pm 

riefcats: £1200 

Available f rom Ven ue B/O and Pavttm B/0 
Tel: 0202-297297 [Credit Cants accepted) 
and aS usual agents (Subject to a boating fee) 


HER LAST INDOOR CONCERT IN PARIS 
15th OCTOBER 1990 
Here is your chance to see tfffirfaismabc TINA 
TURNER ki hexfateweU concat in PARIS.^The tour 
prk»ar£129istl\K}LJUSIVE^(xiachfnvnmost /<^ 
naorU.K. towns anddfes. return crossChannei 1(0 < 
sangs. 2 nghtsn good dass hotels, sight seeing if ’ j 
tow rf PARIS pfas concert hekas for the Ir,^ 
spectaoJarfive show at the BERCY. Return to Vj/v. 

your original d^jarturepwit cm the 16th. 




louoduocd & Candnaed by LOUIS CLARK 
_ n. fly, £1?. £Ib, 118, Cl Box Office/CC U71-9a 8800 

at the ROYAL ALBERT HAIL 
THURSDAY to SUNDAY 
27 to 39 SEPTEMBER at 7 30 pjn. 

© EXTRA PERFORMANCES 
BY HUGE PUBLIC DEMAND 

OPERA 

SPECTACULAR 

NABUCCO Chorus of tbc Hebrew Slaves; DDE WALKURE 
The Ride of Ibc ValkyrW; GIANNI SCHICO O Mv 
Beloved Father: THE BARBER OF SEVILLE Figaro's 
Song: FAUST Jewel Song & Soldiers' Choruv. 
CA VAIXFR IA BUSTICANA Imennezzo: MADAM 
BITTERFLY One Fine Dav: DL TBOVATDBE 
Anvil Chorus: PRINCE (GOS Polovuun Dances; 
PAGUACa Vcsii La Giu ba; TURANDOT Nessun Donna; 

THE PEARL FISHERS Duet; AIDA Grand March; 
CABMEN Toreador's Song; 1ANNHAGSEB Pilgrims' Chores. 

MUSIC * LIGHTS * SPECTACLE 


Telecom Technology 
Showcase • 


The past, present and future story-df 
icleePm muni cations at the pusfr Tof a - 
button, in British Telecom's award- 
winning museum. It’s fun, it's 
educational, it's free and you could even 
win an answering machine in the summer .-' 
quiz. lOamopm Monday-Friday except 
Bank Holidays. 

135 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4/Nr Sr 
PauTs) CaU tree 0800 289 689 anytime. 


" 1U ger Travel LW 


— AfJWisiou 0,UE,,a 

A2933 

SUNWAY HOUSE • CANKL0W MEADOWS ■ ROTHERHAM ■ S60 2XR 


TELEPHONE 

0709 
839839 


CHRISTINE TEARE 
ARTHUR DAVIES JASON HOWARD 

Thursday 27lh. Friday 28rh 

VALOUE MASTERSON 
EDMUND BARHAM JASON HOWARD 

Saturday 2%h. Sunday 3fth 

MASSED FANFARE TRUMPETERS FROM THE 
BANDS OFIHE^WELSH AND SCOTS GUARDS 
CHORUS OF THE ROYAL OPERA HOUSE, C0VENT GARDEN 
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC OPERA ORCHESTRA 
ROBI N STAPLETON Conductor 
TKSErS bore ROEU. ALBERT HALL 
(Dpraffo* rovpraj 871^89(1212/9465 (teocwor Vba) 

AU CREDIT CARDS M B7H06 2428 - 24hr Bookfog 



ntODOX 071-867 104UVI1 tier I *ADU9rV WELLS 0TVZ7B 


rORTUNC Box Office IL re 071 I LYRR SWafWMitv Alp 071 437 
S36 2230 2-liirccbkafet? 071 497 I 368= «: 071KTO V 4UV4RtV77 


9077 

Susan Hill's 

THE WOMAN IN BLACK 


‘?ori: 1 r a icts*-? h:-coa" 





JOHN 

MALKOVICH 9 
MICHAEL 


JO L’ET 
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Mso CC mo bhfl reck 071 4W 
9977/579 4444/081 741 9999- 

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THE FTT Pr HAL L COMPANY 
Itaen-s ' ■ M^STERPfECE- DJ-satl 

T HE WtL P DUCK 

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Man-Sal 7JX) Mm TTwre « 
Sal 2-30 i No mat Thu s Aon] 

• « 2 *L * ™»eomwiitts , I 

MUST END 13 AUOUST I 


8916 Ftnk OU SO- hra 7 tmn 
3407300emu2SAno Mania 
nrt7.80. Sat 230 & 7-50 ttHMn 
11 Alifll A Ttnir .MaW 3.30 
•tram lA'AMl - - 

hmhxl maikzao . 
■SH OT— »t»»«u Ibwb—f oon 


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l A Ucn n uui i «riU not „» odretBad 
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I FHOiJBX BO 071 867 1044 re 
Ow bhd (m< 071 867 lin/071 
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JULIA McHENZn 
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b» HAY COOKI’t new cornody 

Oin: OF ORDER. 


f am: l r 

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071 437 3667 

_"MI CHAEL GAMBON ami 

PETEK BOWIXS ARE SUPERB hi 
_ ALAN AYCKBOURTTS 
MASTERLY COMEDY" Tlm« 

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Mon-Frl e*« 7 4.9 MaUnen Wed 
SO SaluraiM 6.0 A 850 


TODAY 2.00pm & 7.30pm 

BARBICAN THEATRE 


HAYMARKCT THEATRE ROYAL 

BO 071 930 8800 or FlrM Cal 
? 71 W77 ' 3J « Hotline bkg | 

Tfll 9999 Iblre Ire/071 1 
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“GASPING" 

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- BrorthUU n*,, WaampTS, Sun 

FT -A tradWMUl 
reoraHW pfaqr^aoa Baa Jamm 
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-Philip PrmnrT danitog 
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“THuraptianl ... shuoW 

■M ba mtaaad” Today 
Mon-FH 7 45 Sat 4 & 8 
S MORE WEEKS 


LAMNE MUSICAL 

INTO THE WOODS 

hv*w franr 14 Sap* 
qpvas2SS.pl 


KCCWLLVOT1 867-11 is «: no 

ffi? f S? 6 7.1i 1 ,/g>1 1 419999 

071 379 4444 (2«hre)/bU) fee: 
071 497 9977 £4tS! 

RDWAN TM 


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MICHAEL K, 
is a sirigJarli 
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.Jill am 
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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


¥ 


3 t* 


P FINE ART 

6 


Arts 



museum terminates here 

*- Jgjjibbon Williams reports on a failed attempt to create a Mecca for art lovers in a Welsh station 



JibtendofMay, AndreW 
J-aaibert finaBy -aban* 
conedhis two-year cam- 
psugn to give Wiiies its 
«... a , ■, own museum of modern 
art. And last month the removws 

at .. rts T»tential home - a 

S Sed fI?!it ay stati<m “ Machyi 
S? ~ 2 t&cmay what was to be 

the nucleus of its collection. 

UmbotV scheme was am* 
bumuvperimps a little eccentric!. 

Machynlleth does not immediately 
suggest itself as the ideal location 
f a ‘“Tale of the West”. 

{5mtheless,itheldpn)mise. tarn- 

oen was perepkanous enough to 
r-P Ven *** agreement of 

Bnush Rail to upgrade the railway 
line - a museum at the junction of 
die routes from Shrewsbury to 
Aberystwyth and Pwllheli might 
attract the culture' tourists; they 
flock to the KroltavMuUerm 
Holland and to the Winterthur 
Museum m Switzerland, neither of 
which are city-based. In addition, a 
museum in Machynlleth would 
nave helped correct the cultural 
imbalance in Wales between Car¬ 
diff and the rest ofthe country:-••• 
The scheme was well planned 
and detailed. The station itself was 
to retain its function, and. visitors 
would, in effect, have alighted in an 
ait gallery. The building’s upper 
storey and lower staff offices were ■ 
to be converted into galleries, and a 
lavish modem block was to be 
erected on the other side ofthe 
tracks. Even an adjacent hotel was 
envisaged. 

Fearing his project might appear 
a pipe-dream, Lambert elicited ihe - 
backing of Richard Rogers, archi¬ 
tect of both the Pompidou Centre 
and the IJoyd’s building, and the 
partnership: of Alan Stanton and 
Paul Williams, designers of the 
Design -Museum interiors. ' 

These big guns were not his only 
asset In his motiler’s collection of 
paintings, Lambert possessed the 
seed from which a Welsh national 
collection of modern art might 
grow. It is a small group of pictures, 
but the quality is high and all the 
right names are there: among them 
Augustus John, Wyndham Lewis, 
Stanley Spencer and LS. Lowry. 
And there, was nothing overly 
optimistic about amici paring tame 
and gifts: museums sudh as the Tate 
and tire National Museum ofWales 
. have Jwsements bulging with pic¬ 
tures which should be hanging on 
gallery and'museumwafis: AWekh 
museum of modem art m^ht wefl 

An—from 


ABdmrlanbtrtrA 

. collection into cure of international 
’ significance. 

■ Lambert was not so naive as to 
suppose that the , cultural panjan- 
drums in CardifF would rise up in 
Support ofhis proposal and dish out 
the £500,000 he needed to realise it. 
However, he had net reckoned on 
the bureaucratic hurdles and apathy 
he encountered wherever he turned. 
In short,. none. of the public arts ' 
bodies would touch his 'proposal 
with a barge pole. 

The Welsh Office, the Welsh Arts 
Council and the National Museum ’ 
of Wales would not agree to appoint 
directors to tire charitable,company / 
which he tried to set up to raise 
ftinds. From the Welsh'Office’s 
point of view, Lambert’s proposal , 
ran counter to tire recommends-. 
lions made, in the Hudson Davies 
report on 'Hotuiiq; the Arts in 
Wales; galleries were to be located 
-.in, or near ? _ large .conurbations, 
‘rather than ser in the countryside. 
.The Welsh Arts Cbunril said its. 
remit \yasonly .to. help with the 
boosing of temporary exhibitions. 
Ami tire National Museum of 


of modern art at Machynlleth would have helped to correct the cultural imbalance in Wales 


Wales — which, at the time of 
Lambert’s approach, was busy 
securing its own £40 million grant 
from the Welsh Office for its 
extension — was understandably 
less than thrilled about the possibfl- 
xxy of some northern venture 
detracting from its own expansion, 
ikewise, the Development 
Board for Rural Wales 
presented a brick wall: 
Lambert discovered that 
the Board can only pro¬ 
vide 50 per cent of the funding for 
such projects once the other SO per 
cent has been raised from the 
-private sector. In the event, the 
Welsh business community came 
up with less than £500. 

Compared wrtb Scotland. Wales 
is pooriy served by galleries. Not 
only are there no separate national 
collections — that in Cardiff is 
incorporated into the National 
Museum of Wales — but there has 
been no growth of independent 
galleries financed in part by the 
Scottish Arts Council joining forces 
with local and regional authorities. 

In Edinburgh, for example, the 


369 Gallery, which started off as a 
hole-in-the-wall operation in 1979, 
raised a substantial amount of the 
several hundred thousand pounds 
necessary to renovate its three 
floors of warehouse galleries from 
various trusts and donations. It also 
receives £40,000 from the Arts 
Council and District Councils com¬ 
bined, and turns over about 
£20,000 to cover its annual running 
costs. Unlike Lambert's proposal, it 
is a temporary exhibition gallery, 
but its fund-raising zeal could have 
served as an object lesson to him. 
Had Scotland been in the situation 
of. Wales, the standard of its 
premises might well have been 
sufficient to house a national 
collection. 

Anyone who has run the gauntlet 
of regional arts funding could have 
explained the impossibility of rais¬ 
ing large capital sums through the 
agency of the arts quangos. Unless a 
project has the support of the 
Secretary of State for Wales - the 
Cardiff Bay Development Scheme 
is the current best example — all 
public fund-raising avenues are 


effectively closed. In the case of 
galleries, the Welsh Office is unable 
to fund any institution other than 
the National Museum of Wales. 

Be that as it may. the spirit of no- 
can-do which the enterprising Lam¬ 
bert encountered from the public 
agencies in Peter Walker's sup¬ 
posedly revived principality is dis¬ 
tinctly un-Thatcherite. It really 
means that without independent 
sources of finance, only small-scale, 
safe projects can get off the ground 

There may well be deeper reasons 
why Lambert drew a blank. Wales, 
unlike Scotland has a compar¬ 
atively paltry visual art tradition 
and nothing like the educated 
middle-class caucus of collectors; 
the sort of people who will write a 
reasonably sized cheque for a 
worthy arts project. As the 369 
Gal!eiy in Edinburgh discovered 
bodies such as the Arts Council 
eventually rise to the bait of 
embarrassment caused by bour¬ 
geois support Ground-swells of 
influential opinion can have more 
effect on them than the brandishing 
of household names. 


no social service 


A Dream of People 
ThePit 


MICHAEL Hastings’s latest play 
is a singularly inept concoction, 
the more disappointing for the 
comic promise of its opening. In 
comes the prime minister (Tory, 
but male) to hear a senior cml 
servant soberly argue that Britain 
will soon be unable to support all 
its aged arid infirm. The nation’s 
leader's response is to fall sound 
asleep, whereupon bureaucratic 
protocol sensationally collapses. 


v.. Suddenly the FM is wrestled to the 
• floor by Ibis pin-striped appa- 
. .. wadrik , It is as if Sir Humphrey 
Appleby were rugby-tackling God 
After that, the play bumps and 
torches .in. one direction only,, 
whicbis downhilL Never mind the 
indecisiveness of style, - sorry 
though it is. Flays may veer 
between the sombre and the 
satiric, even the earnest and the 
sassy, as this does; they can be 
awkward and confused, as this is; 
and still they can hold the atten¬ 
tion. Here tension and mo- 
- mentun-prove as elusive as wit 
. ami ima gin a t ive flay. 

Peter .McEnery’s Claude 
Godber is not content with his 


assault on Maurice Kaufmann’s 
snoozy fuhner. He gives to charity 
the entire contents of his Wales 
house in (where else?) Hazektine 
Road, Pirbright, Surrey. And in 
between nostalgic visits to a 
London flat once co-occupied by 
Crossman and Barbara Castle, he 
befriends a bag-lady, a burglar, a 
veteran of the miners' strike, and 
others having troubles with the 
social services. They can, he 
repeatedly says, do biro a favour. 

The nature of this favour begins 
to assume dramatic importance. 
Perhaps something exciting will at 
last occur. Alas, all Godber does is 
create a conga-hue of his unruly 
new drums and lead them into yet 


another meeting attended by the 
PM- It is a repeat of the idea that 
launched the play, and inevitably 
less funny, since now all the great 
man does is sweep snootily out, 
leaving Godber’s boss to bewail 
his insult to the civil service. 

Of course, this mandarin has his 
place in the moral bestiary Has¬ 
tings half-seriously, half-jokily 
assembles. He is the ‘’grammar- 
school oik” who betrays his 
Beveridgean beliefs by marrying a 
peer's daughter, going to posh 
restaurants, and saying "ideals 
die, Claude, you’re being naive”. 
The play's observation is not 
precisely subtle. Ncr is its social 
and economic analysis acute. 


Yet Hastings dearly expects us 
to listen seriously to Godber when 
be laments the disappearance of 
"the promise of a gentle evening 
for us all”. For an unclear reason, 
perhaps that be has little more to 
say about his career, he asks us to 
take equally serious interest in his 
marriage and his wife. It does not 
help that, while McEnery’s 
Godber is mostly downbeat, 
Parfitt hurls herself into this last 
role like Callas playing Medea, or 
Medea playing Callas. But then no 
one in Janet Suzman's production 
seems emotionally at home or 
ease. It is that sort of evening. 

Benedict Nightingale 



FILM FESTIVALS 

Old traumas and 
present nightmare 

David Robinson finds black America . 
meeting post-perestroika Russia in Munich, 
and Israeli cinema opening old wounds 


F ilm festivals are a peculiar 
phenomenon of the last 
quarter of a century. Forty 
years ago there were only three - 
Venice (1932). Cannes (1946) and 
Edinburgh (1947). In 1952. Berlin 
was created as a Cold War 
propaganda exercise: later came 
an Eastern bloc festival, alternat¬ 
ing between Moscow and Karlovy 
Vary; and in 1958. London. 

Today there is no certain count 
ofthe festivals which come and go 
like summer daisies. The Ameri¬ 
can show-business journal, Vari¬ 
ety. recently listed more than 
252 — 48 of them in the United 
States alone: 28 in Italy. 

The survival of a festival against 
such competition depends on 
outstanding programming or dis¬ 
tinctive character, whether that 
derives from location (like the 
Midnight Sun Festival, inside the 
Arctic Circle) or theme — there is 
a Funny Festival in Boario and a 
competition of Mountain and 
Exploration Films in Trento. 

The Munich Festival, which has 
just ended, was started in 1983. 
but found its character with the 
building of the new Munich 
Gasieig three years later. The 
citizens were initially suspicious 
of this huge Barbican-siyic build¬ 
ing across the river. The Film 
Festival showed how to use it — 
filling eveiy available space with 
film and video shows, seminars, 
bars and restaurants, and turning 
the bleak counyard into a non¬ 
stop nightly party with bands and 
big-screen out-door silent movies. 

The major discovery in Munich 
this year was Panzer ' a new film 
from Leningrad by a first-time 
writer-director, Igor Alimpiev. 
This is the first film to reflect the 
atmosphere of post-perestroika 
Russia, and it has the kind of 
psychic precision with which Che¬ 
khov caught the malaise at the end 
of the tsarist empire. The film is 
ironic and violent, leaping from 
gritty realism to strange fancies of 
angels floating over the Nevsky 
Prospect, evoking ail the chaos, 
pessimism and betrayal. 

Munich had also put together a 
special programme to show the 
invigorating progress of black 
cinema in America. Spike Lee 
{She's Gotta Have It. Do The Right 
Thing) is by no means the only 
one of the new generation. Wen¬ 
dell B. Harris, a dazzling person¬ 
ality with a voice that rumbles as 
richly as Orson Welles’s, stars in 
his own Chameleon Street, based 
on the real-life adventures of a 
charlatan who successfully went 
about impersonating doctors, 
scholars, athletes and lawyers, 
elegantly overturning the con¬ 
fident preconceptions of the white 
worid. 

To prove the variety of black 
cinema. James Bond Ill’s Del'by 
Temptation is a zany, erotic 
horror movie; and Reginald 
Hudlin’s House Pony is a wild 
teen musical with a good deal of 
implicit moral wisdom. 

To Sleep With Anger is a new 
film by Charles Burnett who. at 
46. is the dean of the new black 
film-makers. Burnett is fascinated 
by folklore, and what first appears 
to be a contemporary story of 
suburban life in Southern Califor¬ 


nia—a dubious stranger with a 
hearty appetite moving in on an 
ordinary family — takes on mys¬ 
tical overtones. 

Documentary is another of 
Munich’s strong points. Die 
Republikaner. by Peter Wunh and 
Petra Schmidt, is a model of 
political film-making — a dev¬ 
astating ponrait of Germany's far- 
right. beerhouse “Republicans*'. 
Emanuel Rund's AlleJuden Raus! 
looks calmly at the contribution of 
one small provincial German 
town to the Holocaust - even 
interviewing Ihe fire chief who 
"failed” to.put out the synagogue 
fire on Kristalinachi. 1938. 

A clever compilation film from 
Estonia. OJav Neuland's Hitler 
and Stalin 1939 shows the un¬ 
canny likeness of the two dic¬ 
tators* methods. If they had 
remained allies, instead of becom¬ 
ing enemies, history might have 
been different. 

The Jerusalem Festival is based 
at the Jerusalem Cinematheque. 
Both institutions are the creation 
of Lia and Wim Van Leer, an 
extraordinary couple with a single- 
minded dedication to movies and 
the people who make them. Their 
Cinematheque has been made out 
of ancient dwellings standing in 
the valley that was no-man's land 
during the partition of the city. 

C inematheque and festival 
alike do much for the liberal 
education of young Israelis, 
which sometimes gets them into 
trouble with orthodox fun¬ 
damentalists. The introduction of 
Sabbath movie-going (which in¬ 
stantly spread to the rest of the 
country) caused some furore at 
first This year there were 
grumblings-in die Knesset because 
a new Israeli film in the festival. 
Daniel Wachsmann's The Ap¬ 
pointed, made pointed links 
beween faith, mysticism, magic 
and the messianic desires of the 
national culture. There was more 
displeasure at the Austrian Pauius 
Minker’s impressive adaptation of 
Joshua Sobol's play. 11‘einiger's 
Last Sight , based on the story of 
Otto Weiniger - the tortured, 
early-century genius whose anti- 
feminist and anti-Semitic writings 
earned Hitler's praise: “The only 
Jew who had the right to survive.” 

Jerusalem was also strong on 
documentary. Specially notable 
' was the West German Mein Krieg. 
directed by Harriet Eder and 
Thomas Kufus. in which ancient 
veterans of the VYefinnachi com¬ 
mentate on the home movies they 
made at Hitleijugend camps in the 
Thirties, and in grimmer scenes of 
the war fronts in the Forties. 

A different view of those years 
was recorded in a very personal 
50-minute British documentary 
from Channel Four, Chasing 
Shadows. Naomi Gryn, daughter 
of the Rabbi of the West London 
Synagogue, recorded her father’s 
return, after 45 years, to his home¬ 
town of Be re ho vo, once belonging 
to Czechoslovakia, now a closed 
Soviet border town. 

Perhaps it is no coincidence that 
Munich and Jerusalem are two 
cities in which the often-sup- 
pressed memories of 50 years ago 
are currently being recalled. 


I 


23 


Jill and her Jacks 
King’s Head, Islington 


UNACCUSTOMED beat can 
play tricks on the mind, so 
possibly the sweltering audience at 
this pub theatre on Wednesday 
night was merely enjoying a 
collective mirage. But the Ameri¬ 
can singer Jill O’Hara made a solid 
enough. impression. Her Jacks 
were a three man/one woman 
backing quartet, and she had 
brought along an idiosyncratic 
collection of songs. 

O'Hara’s experience encom¬ 
passes folk-singing in Greenwich 
Village, creating the female lead in 
Hair, starring on Broadway in 
Promises, Promises and a number 
of straight plays, before her caba¬ 
ret debut last year. Sbe is a woman 
of some beauty, with long grey- 
streaked hair and a ready smile. 
Her voice is true and expressive, 
its timbre reminiscent of Judy 
Collins and Joni Mitchell 
Those ladies and .other Sixties 
figures, such as Joan Baez and 
Randy Newman, were evoked in 
the course of a 19-song show 
which ran for almost two hours. 
There was one. interval, during. 
which’ the' statuesque O’Hara 
switched from a long white linen 
dress to a scarlet gown with 
plunging-neckline. ■ 

Her easy stage • manner and 


quiet authority were superbly 
underpinned .by the “Jacks”: 
Barry Booth on piano, Peter 
Chapman on upright bass, Brian 
Markham on drurps and percus¬ 
sion and Kate Short on cello. The 
group passed from swing to pop to 
light chamber music without 
faltering,-as though telepalhically 
attuned to the singer's intentions. 

The songs displayed excellent 
taste. From Randy Newman there 
were - “Sail Away”, “Dayton 
Ohio”, “Texas Girl After the 
Funeral of Her Father" and “You 
. Can Leave Your Hat On”. From 
Lieber & StoUer came “Some Cats 
Know”, from Joni. Mitchell, 
“River”, from Johnny Mercer, 
-“The Weekend- of a Private Sec¬ 
retary”. One folk song, “Come All 
Ye Fair and Tender Ladies”, was 
most movingly performed. 

Several were not credited, al¬ 
though “Standing Room Only”, 
which began with the line “You 
must think my bed’s a bus stop” 
deserves wider exposure, as do “I 
Can Cook, Too" and “Send Me a 
Man Tonight”. Popular but per¬ 
haps ill-advised was the inclusion 
of “Kitchen Man”, the risqufi 
classic which surely belongs to 
Bertice Reading, with her more 
robust approach. 

The - betweeo-songs chat was 
sometimes too highly polished or 
twee, but there wasno faulting the 
sincerity and warratF of O’Hara’s 
performance. She continues here 
until August 19. 

Tony Patrick | 




NIGEL HAWTHORNE JANE ALEXANDER 

"ON? OF THf BJEST ACTED AND MOST 
.UlTIMAHlf GRIPPING PUttS IN TOWN • 


V ■ :P 





QUEENS THEATRE 

aswu mMSthwk- jwArtfwifr ten, wi • 

toOijA&TjfcCttdrtn.** ||M 2*«S WI-WV4HI 

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Claire Daniels and Geoffrey Dolton in Gr6try's he Huron 




Le Huron 
Buxton 


MOST musicians could hardly 
even name any of Gretry’s 60-odd 
operas, so there is something 
wildly quixotic in staging the 
earliest of them to survive com¬ 
plete, proudly published as “opus 
one”. Still, it is a British premiere, 
which is part of the Buxton 
tradition. And it comes from a 
story by Voltaire, who provides 
the theme of this year’s festivaL 
. Even in the emasculated ver¬ 
sion which Voltaire's friend Mar- 
montel devised, the libretto has a 
strong theme based on the way 
society fails to accept the behav¬ 
iour of a hero who has different 
and more real values. The Huron 
of the title grew up among the 
Canadian Indians: although he 
turned out to" be a nephew of a 
prominent local-family, his man¬ 
ner of counihg the heroine is 
unacceptable until people become 
“enlightened” at the end. A re¬ 
fined and well-judged wii sugars 
Voltaire’s bard social message. 

Moreover, there is enough 
beautifully devised and varied 
detail in the score to explain how 
the young Gretry took Paris by 
storm in 1768 and began an 
unusually successful career. From 
the start, he was admired for the 
way his vocal lines projected the 


texts, and it says much for 
Anthony Hose's translation that 
most of the words are audible. 

Voltaire had the action in 
coastal Britanny, with the Huron 
showing his valour in a skirmish 
with the English fleet. Jamie 
Hayes's production translates that 
into Buxton terms: Chatswonh 
House and the first world war, 
with the Huron related to the 
Duke of Devonshire. In the first 
act it works very well, spiced up 
with a fair amount of slapstick 
that may have surprised Voltaire 
but always stops j usl short of going 
right over the top. 

But then slapstick lakes over 
entirely. It is hard to be amused 
when an upper-class twit keeps 
kicking over the severely war- 
wounded. It is even harder when 
those antics actually drown out 
the two most substantia] arias in 
the opera. Everything in the 
characterisation is thereby coars¬ 
ened beyond belief. 

Geoffrey Dolton sings and acts 
well in the title role. Claire Daniels 
copes elegantly as the heroine, 
supported by a witty performance 
from Jane Webster as her con¬ 
fidante. And Eric Roberts turns in 
a nice cameo as the Duke of 
Devonshire. Christopher GiUett. 
the anti-hero, suffers from the 
worst of the-production. Fortu¬ 
nately the Manchester Camerata 
plays with consistent vitality 
under Michael Rosewelt. 

David Fallows 



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BBC 1 


6.40 Open University' Klein's Unification 
Of Geometry 7.05 Classifying Surfaces 
Geometrically 

7.30 Ptaydays (r) 7.50 Muppet Sabres (r) 

8.15 The 8.15 from Manchester. Young 
• people'sentertammentil 00 Cartoon 

11.05 Rtin: Tail of a Tiger (1984) starring 
. Grant Navm and Gordon Poole. An 
. wfdemandmg Australian famrfy film 
. about a 10-year-oW vintage plane 

fenatic Exduded from the local 
. . modelflymg club meetings, he meets an 

old man who owns a wrecked Tiger 
Moth and spends his summer hoWaya 
hying to restore »f. Directed by Rolf 
deHeer 7227 Weather 
12^0 Grandstand introduced by Bob 
Wilson. The line-up is (subject to 
alteration): 12.35 and 1.05 Special 
Olympics: the games from Glasgow for 
metal ly handicapped aiweies: 1.00 
News; 1.50.2.20 and 3.00 Racing from 
Goodwood; 2.05. 235 and 3.15 
Cycling; the National Track 
championships from Leicester. 4.00 
Show Jumping: the World Equestrian 
Games from Stockholm 


1 BBC 2 _ 

6.50 Open University: Maths Foundation 
Course 7.15 Democratic Government 
7.40Geotogy From Swamps to Coal 
8.05 Engineering Mechanics 8.30 
Professional Judgment 8.55 
Information Technology 9.20 
Electromagnetic Induction 9.45 
Shakespeare's King Lear 10.10 Images 
and Information 10.35 Technology 
and Change 1750-1914 11.00 Policy 
Making in Education 11.25 Evolution 

11.50 Social Science 12.15 Food 
Production Systems 12.40 Physical 
Chemistry 1.05 Images and Innovation 

1.30 Mortem Art and Modernism 
1.55 Culture and Belief m Europe 220 
Third World Studies 

£45 Mahabharat Episode 17 of the 91- 
part dramatisation of the epic Indian 
poem. In Hindi with English subtitles 

3.25 The Sky at Night Titan ts Saturn's 
largest moon Patrick Moore is joined by 
Or John Zamecki to study the moon 
in more detail (rj 

3.50 Hoggin' a Dead Horse. Peter 
Skellem provides a personal view of 
villages, showing how they could be 
places for the future and were certainly 
the homes oi the past, but how they 
are not the place (o five rn at the present 
« 

4.20 90 Glorious Years. A tribute to the 
Oueen Mother to celebrate her 90th 
birthday Horse Guards Parade is 
the venue for a gala celebration, 
including a choir of 500 voices, a 
100-strong orchestra and the Household 
Cavalry (r) 

5.50 World Equestrian Games. Hugh 
Thomas introduces coverage of the 
show jumping phase, after which the 
four (op nders go through to the final 
round tomorrow. John and Michael 
Whitaker represent Britain and are likely 
to f»gire strongly 

7.05 Eyes on the Prize. The third ot a 
senes of six documentaries examining 
the awl rights years in the united 
States In the early 1960s non-violent 
protest was instrumental m change. 

During the I960 presidential election 
campaign, both Nixon and Kennedy 
approved civil nghts, but were eager not 
to isolate the white vote in the South. 

When Martin Luther King Jr was placed 
m jail. John F. Kennedy went to offer 
his sympathies to Mis Cora King, while 


5-05 News with Moira Shari. Weather 
5.15 Regional News and Sport 
5^0 The Plying Doctors: Borrowed 

Time. Green issues intrude into the work 
oi the flying medics of Coopers 
Crossing (Ceetex) 

6.05 Affo, Alto! Another dose of 

Resistance humour from Rene and his 
fnends (r) (Ceefex) 

6 JO That's Showtjusmess. Mike Smith 

puls Showbiz memories to the test in the 
entertainment qua. (Ceefex) 

7.00 Takeover Bid. Bruce Forsyth with 
the game show m which contestants 

gamble whet they have won to get a 

star prize (Ceefex) 

7 JO A Royal Birthday Gala. The stars 

turn out to pay tribute to the Oueen 
Mother as she celebrates her 90th 
birthday. Recorded at the London 
Palladium two weeks ago. the gala 
was also attended by the Queen, the 
Duke oi Edinburgh, Princess 
Margaret and Viscount Lmiey The 
theme is the changing fece of 
entertainment mrouqhout the Queen 
Mother s nine decades Among 
those taking part are Piaodo Domingo, 
Mchaet Caine. Howard Keel. Sir 
John Gielgud. Rowan Atkinson. Sarah 


Robed Kennedy got in contact with 
the judge and managed to convince him 
to release King or bail Kennedy won 
the nan owes) presidential victory in 
American history, due partly to the 
black vote, (r) 

8.05 NewsView with More Stuart and 
Lynette Lrthgow. weather 

3.50 While Noise. 

• John Wyver's anthology of state- 
of-the-art video may leave the sceptical 
wondering where art comes into it. A 
pop video ol the song. Bizarre Love 
Tnangia. is a fan sample ot the 
genre, a bewildering kaleidoscope of 
images, full of sound and fury 
signifying nothing very much, tn some 
cases the artists appear beforehand 
and tell us what their creations are 
about. It is a dubious advantage. A 
woman from Finland explains that her 
piece called Cricket is about “media 
reality and the effects on the human 
subconsciousness''. it mainly 
consuls of shots of insects crawfrng 
over human heads, rather as they 
used to do in early Buriuel films. Form 
replaces content, style abolishes 
substance and technology takes over 
where human creativity used to rule. 

Even a poorly lit shot of a man talking a 
dog is presented as a challenging 
piece of surrealism. But you need to 
know that the dog is called Man Ray 

9.30 Designs on Europe - Six 
Architects Across a Continent 
• M*cftaei Hopkins is (hat rare 
architect, a modernist whose work 
seems to be universally liked His 
admirers include even the Pnnce of 
Wales H Hopkins has any cntrcs, 
they do not surface in Roger Last's 
profile, the first of a senes of films on 
contemporary architects made by 
different European countries Of the 
several Hopkins creations examined, a 
characteristic example is the Mound 
Stand at Lord's, a bold tent-irke 
structure which is very much of the 
fate 20th century arid yet fits happily 
with the 100-year-old pavilion. To 
have pleased the MCC. one of the most 
traditional sporting bodies in Britain, 
is no mean feat. The key to Hopkins's 
success, at Lord’s as elsewhere, rs 
that while he seeks a modem solution he 
is not prepared to sweep away the 
best ol the past. Called in to freshen up 
the V 5 A. he actually returned the 
building to its original appearance. His 


Brighiman. Warren Mitchell Roger 
Moons, Cliff Richard. Armeka Rice, 
Stephan Fry and Sir Richard 
Attenborough. (Ceefex) 

16.15 News with Martyn Lewis. Sport and 
weather 



On the goto chase: CCnt Eastwood (10 J5pm) 


10 J5 Fikrt- Kelly's Heroes (1970) starring 
Clmt Eastwood, Tefty Ssvaias and 
Donald Sutherland. Crutteand noisy 
second world war adventure about a 

group ot soldiers who decide to steal 
a fortune m gold from behind enemy 
lines Directed by Bren G. Hutton. 
(Ceefex) 

1235am Weather 


modernisations ot Bracken House 
and Gtynoeboume wtf be eagerly 
awaited 



Richard Thomas and EUen Greene (10.15pm) 

10.15 dory! Glory! 

• Undsay Anderson begins his first 
American television movie with what is 
surety a conscious homage to his 
mentor, John Ford, as e church 
congregation sings Shatt We Gather 
fit the River? i\ is one of the few sincere 
moments m a roaring satire on 
television evangelism and its obsessions 
with power, money and greed. The 
recent antics ot real TV preachers have 
presented a formidable challenge to 
fictionaJ versions bui Stan Damefs's 
script triumphantly reworks a famiar 
theme. When the charismatic Reverend 
Dan is felled by a stroke, his son 
(Richard Thomas) proves to be a less 
than adequate successor. The 
formerly wealthy church is soon losing 
two million dollars a week. Salvation 
is sought through a vivacious bar singer 
(Ellen Greene) who. with trie right 
financial inducement, agrees to swap 
rock'n'roll tor Rock of Ages. 

Anderson s direction is loo deliberate at 
times but after a stowish start the 
momentum builds relentlessly (Ceefax) 

11.45 Rim: L'fnvita&on (1973) starring 
Michel Robin. Jean-Luc 8*deau and 
FrangoisSimon A meek bachelor 
has a change of lifestyle when he 
acquires an impressive country villa 
following the death ot his mother He 
invites his friends to wsil lor the day, 
but jealousies are brought to the 
surface. A wry, sharply^j&served 
comedy from the Swiss-bom director 
Claude Goretta. who also made The 
Lacemaker in French with English 
subtitles. Ends at 125am ! 


I ITV LONDON 

B.OQTV-em 

9.25 Ghost Train. Includes guest Kelly 
Dingwall tram Home and Away: and 
interviews with Paula Abdul and New 
Kids on the Block. Ptus the usual 
cartoons and the Vicious Boys trying 
to play badminton 

II JO The riV Chart Show. Trie Vintage 

Video slot features the Bangles 
12JG HucweDwtyRnn and Hts Friends. 
Mississippi River advertises or Mark 
Twam s young heroes 
1.00 News with Nicholas Owen. Weather 
i .05 LWT News and weather 

1.10 A Beetle Called Derek: Waste and 
Recycling. Andrea Arnold presents the 

informative environmental senes 
which aims to inspire rather than 
depress. Each year, if every 
discarded can was placed end to end, 
the line would reach the moon, very 
few are recycled and our throwaway 
soewty has created an enormous 
rubbish tip 

1A0 Coronation Street. Wednesday s 
and Friday's epraodes (r) 

2J5 International Rugby. Highlightsoi 
yesterday's Bledistoe Cup match 
between New Zealand and Australia 
in Auckland 

3.15 Athletics. Jim Rosenthal presents 
live coverage of the Panasonic national 

championships from the Alexander 

Stadium m Birmingham Among the 
atntetes scheduled to take pari are 
Steve Cram. Tom McKean. John Regis 
and Tessa Sanderson 
5.00 News with Nicholas Owen. Weather 
5.05 LWT News and weather 

5.10 Attvlebcs. Jxn Rosenthal presents 
further five coverage of the Panasonic 
national championships 

CHANNEL4 r 

6.00 Coffee Book 7 JO International 
Times 8.00 Transworld Sport 9.00 
Channel 4 Racing: Trie Moming 
Line 

9 J5 Australian Rides Fbotbafl 
introduced by Steve RoWterd 

10.30 Hand in Hand. Series for deaf and 

hearing children (r)11.00 Check OuL A 
repeat of fast Tuesday's consumer 
magazine. (Teletext) 

11 JO Wagon Train (b/w). Trie classic 

1956s western series following a wagon 
train of settlers hearting west 
12J0 California Off Beat Reporter Wayne 
Freedman looks at some Californian 
entrants in the Hall of Fame, 
inducting trie US dog barking champion 
and a record-breaking peza losser 
1.00 Film: Perfect Strangers (1945. b/w) 
Robert Donat and Deborah Kerr as a 
downtrodden clerk and fos dowdy 
wife who leave their humdrum lives to go 
to war. He goes mto the Navy, she 
joms the Wrens and they meet again as 
strangers who must start their 
relationship all over again. A warm 
second world war comedydkama 
directed by Alexander Korda 
2.55 A Day's Pleasure (b/w). A Charfie 
Chaplin short 

3.15 Channel 4 Racing from Newmarket 
introduced by John Francome. Live 
coverage of the Red Mountain 
Coffee Cup (&20); the Man on Sunday 3- 
y-o Senes Handicap Stakes (3 JO); 
the Coleman 's of Norwich Stakes (4 JO); 
and the Gtyfada Stakes (4 JO). Trie 
race commentator is Graham Goode 

5.10 Brookside Omnibus (r). (Teletext) 

6 JO Don't Just Sit There. A new series 
designed to show that almost all areas 
oi sport are open to the disabled. 


5J0 Zotro: Trie Best Man. Trie masked 

hem continues his brave fight to protect 

the innocent from tyranny. The _ 

fiancted Don Dtego’s cousin j«3 him 
when she sets eyes on Zorroat the 
Pueblo. Oon has a lot of trouble 

convincing her that AM port 

many the masked rider. Starring Efrem 
ZSmbatieiJrandDuncanRegehr.- 

eooChanttwwBtockbustws.fhe' 

chanpwns of t9Q4, Steve Jones and 
Robin Leech, return to test ther 

general knowledge skffls and take home 

prize money for meK chosen 
charities. Bob Hotness is the 
questionmaster 

6J0 Stars to Their Eyes. LesSeCrowtfter 
invites more stars’ dappe/gSngers io 
impress the audience and imitate 

their idote, who range from Roy Orbtson 

fo Madonna 

720 irs Beadle! Jeremy Beadte«oW on • 
the prowl again, playing outrageous 
jokes anddSteh games on 
unsuspecting victims (r) 

7J®CtosetoHon»:DoiAteDate' ' 
Down-toearth sitcom stamngRaul 
Nicholas as a divorced vetWrtlo 

bring up fes two children. Kate and 
RoWM decide it is time thw fetter 
had a gtrtfnend, so they arrange a bind 
date for him through a computer 
dating agency Meanwhfle, the sugeiy 
plays-host to a dangerous 
rattlesnake and Rose asks James to 
help sort out the custody of a caL 
(Oracle) 

8.20 The Sefm: The Software Murders. 

Simon Dutton stars as the smooth- 
talking tailoring advertisement 
whose filecontrives to be a nonstop 
adventure. An Ameocan scientist, 
working on an anti-terrorist device, 
justifiably fears for her fBewheoher 
name appears on a hrt-fet After several 

Martin Duffy, fanseifraxmaflyina 
wheelchar. gives disabled children ..' 
the chance to compete in a wide range 
of sports, from hovercraft races to 
canoing, which even the able-bodied 
would find challenging. Today's 
programme comes from Bendrigg Lodge 
resi dent ia l sports centre in Cumbria 
which specialises in courses for people 
with disabiHies. (Teletext) 

7J00 Trie Wortd Trias Week with the latest 
news cn the crisis in the Gulf; and a 
report on (he conflict between he 
militant and ftoeral wings of the Mohawk 
tndran tribe 

8.00 Kingdom of the Deep: The Seas 

Must Live. The final programme in the , 

award-winning wBd&fe document&y 
series records, the growing catalogue of 
man-made disasters that are 
polluting our oceans and Ihreatering the 
existence of marine species (r), 

(Teletext) 

9.00 thirtysornetfeng. More spectacular 
navel-gazing in the superior soap about 
Americans approaching hie age of 
40. Last in the series. (Teletext) 

10.QQ Cycling: Kellogg's Tour of Britain. 

Trie fifth stage of (he tour tea 115-mile 
stretch from Bridlington to 
Newcastle taking in the Yorkshire . . 
moors. Phil Liggett and ChrisMarin 
report. 

10J0 Rim on Four International: Lorca, 1 
Death of a Poet (1987). 

• Asmafl neat figure with around • 
expressive face, the British actor 
Nickofes Grace plays Federico ; 

Garcia Lwca in a Am-made for'Sparitoh 
television by the veteran onema -- ' 
director. J. A. Sardem. As with many TV 
movies, this one has its moments ot 
slackness, as if finding difficulty fifing - 
the generous screen terra. There 
was much to be sad far the old 


mysterious deaths, Simon sets out 
to bring toe murderer tojusfice. With 

Panrate Sue Martto and Onsttete 

Landen (Oracle} __ 

10.10 News with Nicholas Owe*. Sport 
and weather 10 l 25 LWT Wetohsr 

10 J0 Pick of fl» PSots. Denis Nord« 


astrological prediction shows 


satire from the Eatex puppets. Desmond 
Lynam and Garafd Wttams am this. 


and downs of Wtotbtedon's terass 
tounrameflLMeBnwfde.apofiticai - 
revolution is talcing ptece as Maggie 

Antofehe and the Ginger T%npernef _ 
battle it out ft 

11 JO Tour Of Duty: True Grit Dramewflfi, 
Americancdnscnpis fighting in the 
Vietnam War. Trie soldiers ant - 
. exhausted after ttraTm Offensive, but 
refuse to give up 

12J0em Fftm Fright (1971). Overdone 
and unpleasant thriSer about a young 
baby-sitter (Susan George) who •. 
spends a tenorJBed night at a country 
. house being menaced by a - 
psychotic from a mental haspiteL Wth 
Honor Blackman, George Cote and 
Dennis Waterman. Directed by Peter 
Coftnson. Foflowed by News 
headlines 

2.15 FUnc Rom Beyond the-Qrave . 
(1973) starring Peter Cushing, Diana 
Dors and David Warner. Neat route 
story frarror about visitoRi to a sriraB . 
antique shop who meet with various 
tefifcle fetes. Directed by KevinCoonor 

4.15 Trie Hit Man and Her. Music and fun ‘ 
with Pete Waterman and Michaels 
Strachan 

5-15 fTN Morning News with Phfl Roman. 
Ends at 6 JO 



Scente watching: Mckoias Grace (lOJfeqtf 
HoBywoodcfiscipfineofajttingflra 
cackle and getting on it Apart Beta - 
Grace's performance, which blends 
effectively with those of the otherwise 
Spanish cast, ttte strengths of the 
film are its attention to Ow physical 
landscape of Lorca's Spate and ' 
careful reconstruction-oT the social and 
artistic confextm wtvchhfe writing 
devtioped: Figuressuchas Bunueiand 
Dali are brought useful into the 
narrative and thereto a guest spot for 
today's leading Lorca interpreter, 

Nuria Espert, as a theatrical producer. 

1246am VenficLTortghtfs jury must 

decide whethercefibacy is afirm basis 
for a good marriage or a recipe for 
rfisasteun the caseof Jufiaand GXesi a 
couple whoseseverhye&r 
relationship does riot kwtedesex. v 
Moderator^HelenBoaden 
2J0Trie Harp tottfe Southl 
. adapfedfrom Ruth Fork’s novel aboat 
an IrishAustzafian bmify atnjggtino 
tomakeericfemeenoffteaffemfetfiaf 
tfra second workfwsrfr).ErKfe at " 
2J5 


ANGUA 

As London except: 11 30pm Fikn- The 
Hosuge Hem 1.15am SuilhcKs 2.15 The 
Hi Man and Her 4.15-5.15 US PxhSixfmg 
Tour 

BORDER 

As London except 1>«0 pth-Z 35 The Life 
and Tunes of Grczfy Adams 11 JO Pfm; 
Jaguar Lives 1.15am Ki*aJ« 215 The Hit 
Man and Hei 4.15 Wdkam Tel 4.45-5.00 
Amenca s Tap Ten 

CENTRAL 

As London except 12.30pm-1.00 Oamr*- 
ons it JO film 'IHji of me Dartness i.iSam 
Kopfc 2.15 The Trnte^t Zone 2.45 CmemAi- 
tractions 3.15 Americas Too Ten 3.45 
Beyond 2000 4.15-5.15 BKedal 

CHANNEL 

As London except 12.30pm-1 00 Wnd- 
sr^x 11 15 Film Loca 1.05 Fr>oa> me 13th 
2.05 The Munsiers lodav Z3S Saw Power 
3.35 Mgni Gallery 4.00-5.00 The t-U Man 
ana Her 


GRAMPIAN 

As Lonoon except fZJOpm-l.OO Am 
Fasach 11.30 Wm Ttureen At Dinner 
l.15am Koiah 215 The w Man and Her 
4.15 Witpm Tefl 445-5.15 America's Top 
Ten 

GRANADA 

As London except 11.30pm Fam Thneen 
ai Dune* 115 Hop* 2.15 The Hu and 
Her 4.15 Wdam Tea 4.45 Amencas Top 
Ten 

HTV WEST 

AsLonoonexcept 11.30pmfirm TheBfcss 
ot Mrs Btassom 1.15am Mamed .with 
Children 1.45 Three’s Company 2.15 The HI 
Man and Her 4.15-5.15 Ovs weefc uNascar 

HTV WALES 

As HTV West except No variations 
TSW 

As London except l2J0pm-t 00 The 
Soulh w«i Wee* il 30Fam And Then you 
0*1 15am Koj» 215 IheH«i Manana Ha 
4.15 W*am Tel 4.45-5.00 America s lop 
Ten 


for tour no MoroxQuoa cur us on 


f ; RUatn UIMPM. SATUUMKIAX-ML 

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Weekdays 8am-8pm. Saturdays 8am-lpm. 
Our extra service starts as soon as you get in touch 

aidibMr in NiTTirm Ijrhnd 

Ej^Ic Sar InuinacF Conpw Licutni Hrp^rrcd Ji Lothlmi No 
_ HqtiilnoJOSrcrRfrSiMnv Atr Lnadnn ECJAlJij TIM 4JG 


As London except I2afexn-1.00 Wbxj- 
sijrt 1 11.30 Rim Lola 12flam FfxHv (he i3m 
220 The Munsiers Todav Z45 Raw Power 
3.45 The Twihgni Zone 4.15-5.00 The rtt 
Man and Her 

TYNE TEES 

As London eveapt 140pm Kans and Dog 
2.05-2.35 Buiseve 1120 Rim The Fngni- 
erwd Ciiy 1.15am Koiai- 2.15 The mi Mjn 
3rd Hei 4.15 Witoam Tea 4.«5-6.15 Amer 
ca 3 Top Ten 

ULSTER 

As London except 12JQpm-1.00 The 
Munsiers Today 1.40-2.35 The A-Team 
11.30 Frfm OicusotHonom 1.15am KoaL 
2.15 The mi Man ana Her 4.15 W4kam Tdi 
4.45-5.00 America s Top Ten 

YORKSHIRE 

As London except 1225am F*n n u i- 
cracker 215 The mi Man and ms 4.15-5 15 
Hxence® ineL4einmeChateau 


RADIO 3 


* C >- 


Asking those questions: 
Bob Holness (6pm) 


Sure 5.00am Early Monwig 925 Aus'ra- 
ban Rules Football 1020 Hand in Kano 
11.00 Check Out 1130 Gardeners' Caien 
dar 12.00 &smo 1230 LiKm the Sues 130 
Europe E*fxess 200 Film Mbs Pmaanor' 
3.15 Raong from Newmartiei S10 Broo*.- 
side 6.30 Oon i Jus! &! There 7.00 Citizen 
2000 7 30 NewvtMw 7.40 Gweld Se* 825 
Rygtv flhvngwiadoi 9.00 Esteaafod Gened- 
laetlKX Fientmoi Cymru. Cm Rhythm. 1990 
10.00 Cychng Kefcxjg s Tour Ol Bntam 
10.30 Fam Wngs oi Oestre 1245 Vetd»ci 
2,00 The Harp m me South 255 Oiweoa 

RTE 1 

Starts: 1025amTh*Glx»idf MonVststand 
10.40 Bi jrj- Ro'jers n lire 25m Century 
1130 Ruler s Cove 1155 Conauesi 1255 
The Borne Woman 1.45 Hews loUwed Bv 
Fuji Moon 220 The Disney Hour 3.10 Film 
The Sea Haw* 5.30 New Chesmufs 6.01 
Hews 6.15 PMh> s Par ty625Some Mother s 
Do Aie'Em 7.05 John Raver Tops8.05 The 
Flying Dociots 9.00 News920 Fields ert F w 
11.05 News *o*ow*i ov Film That Lucky 
Tough 1245am Close 

NETWORK 2 

Sians: 1230om News 1234 Sports Siati- 
um 5.15 Janior jeft 5.25 fw Live ai Three 
Seven lot a SB* Fmai 655 Hoaent 7 00 
Plan 730 The Tracer unmarm Snow 6 00 
News folowed by Knebwonn 1990 11.35 
CfcKie 


SATELLITE | 

_ SKY ONE 

6.0Barti 6amw fleei 6 30 Jhe Fi^ >:m 
7 00 Fun Pacrorv 11 i» Trie &omc *Vomjn 
1200 Frank Ifeuqn iVona 1 (»pm 8 lack 
Sheep Squao«y»"2.QQ vneatimg Challenge 
300 Th e Increiiljk? H* 4.00 Chopper 
Souad 5.00 Sara 6 00 The Lo»:< Boai 7 00 
Those Amfflng Annals 6 00 Fat* is the 
Hunter 10 00 Siwsiars oi v*esihng 11 00 
World fce«s Tumtjn: 1130 Tne unload 
awes 1230am Pages from Skyien 

SKY NEWS ’ 

cn Ihc hour 

530am Those Were in* Days 630 The 
World - an crfabng TV thsior, 930 th^ 
Were ih*j Da*:- 1030 Mairir Soon- News 
11.30 The wo«id - a tv neiory l J 3Cfcm 
Fairvon TV 1 00 1 -J) Th* Rt«iners 2.30 
Malar Soors News 3 00 3.30 Tu,? 

Wand - an Tv nisior/ 4.30 I ruse Wuirj ir*. 
Eq-.-s 5.30 Lnlenanneni ims Woe* 630 
Fasnajn rv 7 30 The Reporters o 
fcmenjnmwii ims Wef* 10.30 Faanon Tv 
11 30 Hie Brfl ol Targei 1230am The 
reoortere 1 30 Thov Were IMe Qays 230 
Nainnal Ga»erv 330 The Best ol Target 
430 Tnose were me Days 


FM SI ergo and MW 
5 00am Gary Kng 7.00 The Bruno and 
U7 BreaMasi Show 10.00 Dave Lee Travis 
1230pm The Haoo i Saiumay 
Saiufdav Roadshow 200 Don'i Watefi Thai! 
3.00 The Saiurday Sequence 7.00 
Andy Peeples Sam Tran 10.00 in Concert 
11.002.00am The Saturday Rocfc 
Show 


RADIO 2 


FM Stereo 

4.00am Dave Bussey 6.00 Giaham 
Krxcyu 8.05 fiomtie EWton w<tn Savxvlsol 
the Fifues 9 00 Brian Mannew with 
Sounds oi me Srrties 10.00 Anne Robmson 
12.00 Geaks naioet 1 30pm Scnwone 
ana me Gn*ii«eweeas 230 Room flay cn 
Record 3.00 Munoay on Saturday 4 45 
Loos Mcxorsh at the <Kwmi Ogah 5.00 
Crema ?530Jaz? Score 6 00 in me 
Moca 7 00 wa* *nin lov® 7 30 Saturday 
Night Gas. fughi 9.30Easy Does h 
10.00 Rattr 2 Ans Oro»»nme 12.05am 
Stars <X me Swbes l.0U4iX) Nqni 

MW as above ©cert 1 30-6.D0pm 
Scon on 2 230 Racal Chesiemeio Cup 
3 tOvoasumw Nassau Slaves 7 25- 
9.00Rugoy umori Aigenwa v England 


I WORLD SERVICE 

AV times m BST 

! 600am News 6.09 Hours 630 Londres 
I Matin 7 00 Newsctsfr 7 30 Menaon 8.00 
I News B 09 24 Hours B30From ine Weektes 
1 8 45 Nelson- L*. 9.00 f^ews 9.09 Words o) 

I Faiin 9 IS A doily Good Show 10.00 Mews 
| 10.09 Rewcnoi She Bmish Press 10.15 The 
1 wono Today 1030 Fmancxal News 10.39 
I Scons Roww-jp 1045 World Bnel 11.00 
News Summary 11 01 Here s Humph 1115 
Letter From America IT 30 Mdi Magarxw 
I 1159 Travel 1200 News 1209pm 
rie*s attxji Bman 1230 Mendan 1.00 
Newsreel 1.15 MUimack 3 1.45 Spcrls 
Poundup 2.00 News 209 24 Hours 2.30 
MemA LW 245 Sportswndd 3.00 News 
Summary 3.01 Sponswond 4.00 Newsreel 
4.15 eaC Encash 420 Naomchren 4.40 
German Fea’ijrea 459 Tiavel Itewc 530 
News 5.09 News about Bnun 5.15 BBC 
cnchcn 5.30 Lorwes Sc-u? 6.14 News 
Headlines 6.15 Juste Ftun Madness 6.30 
H>:u:e A>>iueli 7.00 German leahjie 754 
f4acm-chien820 News Summary 8 45From 
trie wee* ires 9.00 News 9 09 f iom Our Own 
Coueccorratiil 925 IVoris ol Failh 9.30 
f.'etidian 10.00 News Summary 10.01 S per is 
Roundup 10 IS Jusie Pun Madness 1030 
To Rigni a wrong 11.00 Newsnour 1200 
Ney»s 12 05am w«dsoi Faun 1210 Book 
C hoc* 12 15 A JoAy Good Snow 1.00 
Newsdes* 1 30 The xen Bruce Show 200 
News Summary 2-01 Play ol the WeeF 3.00 
News 3 09 Review ol Ifte British Press 3.15 
Newsiea 3.30 industrial Revolutions 359 
Weatnei 4.00 ivi 4 09 News aooul Britain 
4 15 Fiom Our Own Corresoonoenl 430 
Personal View 4.45 NaCTWCTIen und 
Piessescwau 5 00 German Fealutes 535 
News in CrTtman 5 45 Hsa®nes 5 47 Press 
Rowya 5.52 Financial Review 556 Weather 
and Trauvi-'iew's 


SKY MOVIES 

200txr> Ugtn of Day i i«7t Mduei J Fo. 
siars as a facrcr, worker ov m,, w^, 
ioo n ion Oy m> 3 hi m a tana narurg to. 'is 
oig brean siamng Joan Jen ana Gere 
Rowlands 

400 Dangerous Curves ( 1 ®?j Two 
Amencan tuos are emiusied mm a new 
Porsche >o deiivei ;o Lake lanoe The car 
stolen and aocean as ma cue in a oeayfy 
comes! 5ianuig 7are Doorvan gno uosne 
Neisen 

5 30 Madonna in Concert in concert m 
Barcskma ftond Ampthon Tow teaures 
a sri/vwig <mow and her tyealesi nus 
7 40 tmenanmeni Tongfu 
6.00 Caooysreck 2 inffh Thai bastion ol 
srawtKT, the SucowTOd Country Gun OuD. 
is once agam ine scomg 'or some wacky 
comedy as a seti-maoe nv*ona«e oioos ji 
nwreni; to >jei into me set Sramng .lacirio 
Mason flown Stack Dvan Caimcn Cntvy 
Criast? Oar> 4-AioyC anc Banov CiM 
10 00 Corots 1 Set m me streeiganq 
world ol la a w..iL»an coo <5 leameo -jo *i»h 
a voung recnxl whose sivie soon di-suoys 
toe- stale «truci oeiwften me and ine 

powe Stamng Booert Ou<r& Sean Penn 
and -■Jftna Cdr-chla Ajgnso 
12.15am And GOO Oeawd Women (l99Tt 
A CTisowot ,n a 'rey* Vemc t> taU is oneted ne* 
iiueoum il sno w4i oeceme d respeciaoM 


6.35am Open Urwersity (FM only) 
6.55 Weather and News Head kies 
7.00 Morning Concert: Wagner 
(Prelude Parsifal Royal 
Concert gebouw Orcttesha 
under Haitink. Ra^wnaninov 
(Prelude m G mmor. Op 23 No 
5: Andrei Gavrttov. piano); 
Vaughan Wtttams (Five 
Vananrs on Dives and 
Lazarus Northern Sinfonia 
under Richard Hickox) 

7 30 News 

7.35 Mornmq Concert (contcf): 
Francfc'(Syrrononic variations: 
ihe Berim PO under Karajan. 
AJeos Wassenberg. piano). 
Franqai* (Horn mage a I'ami 
Panageno MarazVMnd 
Ensemble under Franpaix. 

B anoj. Grainger (Bfatfie Bdls: 

ournemoufh Smforaetta 
under Montgomery). Gershwin 
(Preludes Nos 2 and 3 Dag 
Acnatzj uszi (Les Pfeiudes: 
Berlin PO under Karajan) 

8 30 News 

8.35 Ha Majesty's Choice Music 
chosen by the Oueen Mother 
tor Patron's Choice Concert at 
the AioeOurgh Festival in 
1975 Bmren (A Time there 
Was CBSO under Simon 
Rattle). Mozarl (Smtoma 
concerfante in E fiat. KV 364: 
Vienna Pn^harmomker under 
Harnoncourt. Gidon Kremer. 
viohn. Kim Kashkashian. viola) 
9.35 Record Release- Bach (Tno 
Sonaia in G. 8WV 530: 
Chnsiophei Hemck. organ); 
Mozart (Concerto for three 

S ianos, K242 Berlin PO under 
emyon Bychkov. Katia and 
Manelle Labeque. piano: 
Schubert (Three Songs from 
1815 - Effy Ameling, soprano, 
Graham Johnson, piano}: 
Beriwz (Symphome 
faniashque: Toulouse Capriole 
under Piasscn). Smelana 
(Quartet No 1: Emerson 
Quartet). Walton (Music for 
As You Uke It Academy of St 
Marim undei NewHe Mamnei. 
Caihenne Bott. soprano). 
Duruffe ( Four Mot^s: Choir of 
Trinity. Cambridge, under 
Richard Marlow) 

12.05pm haydn and I he Plano (new 
series) Alfred Brendei talks to 
Siephen Plaislow, and plays 
Haydn (Sonatas: in E mmor, B 
mmor and m D(f of 5) 

1.00 News 

1.05 Words Breaking the Scientific 
Language Earner with 
Professor John Durant (4 of 4) 
1.10 Classical Gmlar at Esztergom: 
Kfiysnoi Peiech. guiiar, plays 
arr Bach (Luie Suife in E 
mmor i Asior Pezzola (Verano 
porieno. Milonga del Angel. La 
muerta del Angel. Pmnavera 
ponena) 


wile As «»n as w s eui. she dectdia rtoi 
lootav by nei jayes rues Sramnq Reoecca 
C&ito'W. Vincenl Spano end Frank 
Lange«a 

200 Good To Go (i960 Art Garfuitd 
pays a journal*! named on a raoe-rnuffler 
ctuige wno seis esn to deal ms name Set 
n Wasrvngion Starnnq Rooert Douou, 
Hams Yuan, flegmata Daughtry and Rtfftaid 
Brews 

a.OO me Yakijza ( 1974 ) Robert Mnchum 
veniyres io jaoan (o rescue a meners 
naugm* »rom me Japanese k«4a Swing 
Tafcakura Ken ana flnan neon 


EUROSPORT 

6.00am as S<y ■>. 900 FoolbaS 930Judo 
1000 Tax 12 00 Wheels 1230pm wwd 
Eauesinan Games Su^nolm ATP Teftms- 
Ausinan Open. Kitm/iel 6.00 Mnrtsier 
Truc«s 7 00 FiXitCkik 830 Terns 1000 

E-3'«g 11 00 EguL-smanam 

SCREENSPOHT 

600sm Moiorc-^dng 7.00 ShMliXTipng 
9.0Q Terms 11.00 US Pro Boung 12 30pm 
LtoB.-'f Leaoie Baseoall 230 Canoemg 3.00 
Usicr Sm»i 5.00 Weekend Live. 
Sownepen Uooa'e 8.00 Mom Sport 900 
bewang 10.30 6o«ng 1200 Canoeng 
1.00am moioi Spun X00 Baseoafl 


1.45 Newbury Spring Festival 1990: 
Dorian Wind Quintet of New 
York performs Vivaldi (Sonata 
for recorder, oboe ana 
bassoon mG mmor): Adolphe 
(Night Jouney): Taffenel 
(Quntei in G minor) 

2J0 Seventies SondhetfiFon 
Broadway: A Little Night 
Musx:; Mark Steyn examine 
sone of Soodhemi's popular 
shows, mspned by Ingmar 
Bergman's film Smiles at a 
Summer Night 

3 JO Schubert- ffemer Keuschnig 
and Mari Nomura piano, play 
Fantasy in F mmor 

4.15 Giles Swayne and Jonathan 
Harvey Arditti String Quartet 
performs Swayne (Quartet No 
2). Harvey (Quartet No 1) (r) 

5 JO Jazz Record Requests with 
ChariesFox 

5 AS interpretations on Record: 
Roger Nchois on DeOuSsy's 

toages 

6.45 Schumann Sonm. Margaret 
Field, soprano. Paul 
Hamburger, peno. perform 
Lteoerweis.Op39.Die 
Senrttn. Smget rachtm 
Trauertonen, Gastemtihe, Die 
Kaneniegenn (r) 

7 JO Proms 1®0: Live from the 

■ Albert HaH. London. 

Bournemouth SO led by Bela 
Dekany under Andrew Davis, i 
wtih Stephen Hough, piano, 1 
performs Metsan (Overture: 
Helios); Rachmaninov (Piano 
Concerto No 3 in D mmor) 

8.25 A Union of Like Minds? 
8.45 Sibelius (Symphony No 2 
m D) 

9.45 Dean Swift and Mrs Pfikington: 
Samantha Bond reads from 
the memovs of a leading 
figure of literary Dublin 

10.00 Venetian Virtuosi: Monica 
Hugged woSn. Bruce Dickey, 
comet Sarah Cunningham, 
cello. Chattel Tool trombone, 
Paul Nicholson. 

f^H^chitaTO^peilc^n 
Riccn (Canzona a qua tiro); 

Cima (Canzona No 6 a 
quatlro): Fontana (Sonata for 
vtofm and confinuo):.CasteBo 
(Sonata a tie) 

1030Ulster Orchestra ted by 

Richard Howarth under James 
Lockhart wtfh Sarah Leonard, 
sofirano. performs Berlioz, arr 
Matthews (Serenade, Hymn 
and Toccata): Colin Matthews 
(Night Music. Op 10); Holst, 
arr Matthews (The Dream City) 
11.25 Saturday's CNd: London Jazz 
Ensemoe under John 
Lanchbery performs Jazz 
Calendar. Richard Rodney 
Bennett's sufe. based on the 
children's rhyme 
1200 News 1205am Close 


Twenty-kw hours of rock and pop 
LIFESTYLE 

1200 CapOn G*m 1230pm EnMgn 
OTooIp 130 The TomEwefiSiw 1.30 Oiro 
Sup Beyond 200 Cfempionshp Rodeo 
3.00 Wrestwg 4 .00 The Edge Ot figin R00' 
The Sdfe-Waon Shoppng Cnamwl 

BSK THE MOVIE CHANPEL 

1130am The Emigrants (1971) Sfering 
Max von syonw and Lnr umw ToucHmg 
drama about e Sweden lamriy who come to 
seme n America m me i9mconkny. 
Starring Lnr {jman and Jan TrofiH 
235 Run 00 Vqv Fan (1963) Starting Jamie 
Fan and Fred Savage- A private detective 
wants io wn MCk fits *4e but fo do ther he’ 
must struggle through law school 
4 00 Dancers (1987). Stamng kfifchafl 
Barvstnko* and Alessandia Fern a seif, 
centioa baBet Kar fab m kwe <Mh a yomg 
MReme txn w4 ha arrogance allow mem 
the happmess they wanf 7 
630 The Ewok Adventure 1 . Caravan ol 
Courage (1984). Slamng Enc Water and 
Warwich Davis. The Ewoks of Endor offer 


LW (s) stereo on FM 

5J5aro Shipping Forecast .. 
6JX) News wsrfmg: Weather 
630 Trie Farming week 6J0 

Prayer for the Day(s) 635 
Weather 7.00 Today, ind . 
7.00, 73a 8 JO.830News 
735,838 Weather . 

930 News 935 Sport on 4 
930 Breakaway; Holiday and travel 
news . 

1030 News; Loose Ends (new 
senes). Ned Sherrinand 

1UJ0 Tearing Potties (new ' 
senes): Peter Jenkins, talks to 
senior politicians about the 
quaSbes needed to get on in 


politics (1 of 3) 

1130 From Our Own ' 

Correspondent: R^tectionsof 
Be and politics abroad , 
1230 Money Box: Uranuddtoig your 
money. Advice about 
manepng personal and femly 
finance 

1235pm Hoax! (new series): terv 
Wallace. Maureen Upman and 
John Welts ten some amazing 
stones -two are true but one 
is false. Hosted by Tim 
Brook e-Taytor (s) 1235 
Weather 
1-00 News 

1.10 The Radio Generation (new 
series): A group of young 
. people who were first-time 
voters in the 1987 election 
share their opinions on issues 
in today's world with Simon 
Bales (r) 

. 230 News: a 90th Birthday 

Present: A celebration of the 
Oueen Mother's 90 years as 
reSected-in a collection of 
stones end anecdotes told by 
those who have met her 
230-Play: Artist Descending a 
Staircase continues the Tom 

Wade describes her 
upbringing in South Africa as 
thechdd ol an vchdeecon (s) 
4.00 W® You S«f Love Me?: Over- 

. sfxties from around Britain tafli 
fraridy about romantic and 
sexual love Is) (0 
4.80 Soence Now 
530 Conversation Piece: Sue 
MacGregor ta&s Io swimmer 
SharonDavies <r> 

635 Little Blighty on the Down: Trie 
conical gorngsenm the 

ssRsSasfltt 

Waather 

630 News; Sports roundup. 

635 Citizens: Omnibus edition (s) 


' • -T'-r| 

. 7.10 In Trie Psychiatrist s Chair,. . 
• There's fee Xmrtof tension 
about Anthony Clare's 
" co n sU tahons" that; we findtn 
tin best peychoiogicai 
thrOeo. They £oe cat-and- 
mouse games played for real, 
and (hou^i Tom (On Clare) - 
ahnost always wins. Jerry 
(tonight, theatie dsector Sk 
Peter HaH) can.make. it a hard- 
■ wai victory. Sir Refer, 
confessed^ a man in the grip 

of theatrical obsession, also 

. .. owns up to constantly . 
donnmg what is cte rnueur (or 
the actor-members of his 
profession - a succession of 
masks. Clara dbes not so 
much rip them off as coax HaS. 
to remove them femsett. For ■ 
the fetener. tins is pfeaaurahie 
. torture (r) 

7.45 Saturday fiSghl Theatre: The 
Petition by Brian Clark, was 
written for and dedicated to 
Dame Peggy Ashcroft who 
now performs the rote tor the 
first time. With John MBs. At . 
breakfast In their Belgravia 
apartment General Sr 
Edmund Mine sees 50 yarn ■ 
ol mamed fife in a new light - 
when Lady Elizabeth reveals 
her hue hatred of the horrors 
of war (s) 

9,00 Music in Mind: Brian Kay plays ■ 
a wide selection of mekxkes m ■ 
• honour of the Queen Mother's ' 
birthday (s) 

-930 Ten to Ten led by Fr Ofiver 

iaooHES man<s,a59w ^ 

10.15 Trie Gardening Quiz (new 
series) hosted by Stefan 
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knowledge with a team of' 

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opera anger watard White 
about his most kn p o i taut day ( 

1130 fte Tingle Factor Jeremy 
teaacs tafts about the musk: 
that sends shivers up his 
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1130 Arnold Brown and Company: . 
Arnold and his team with ther : 
unfe w lykat the world with "• 
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21 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Sunday’s Television & Radio 


COMPILED BY PETER DEAR AND MERLE ADAM 

•TELEVISION CHOICE PETER WAYMARK/RADO CHOICE PETER OAVALLE 




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John Craven reports 


- _\'z «ui wBoger-oaitinq, 

and me work of UK Animal Watch, ' 

’ f’.^Sf^^ded^edtosianTping 
„ ^ fl* tte actMty. 12^5 Weather 

I^NevrswrthMoffaSniart.Fotowedby 

• Speaking Volumes. P.D, James is * 

jwned by Irma Kurtz, Jack Trevor 
Story and Andrea Newman to Hurras 
‘toatan m&’s coflection of essays 

22i£P2?‘? 0n G >ov $ nni < Garrison 
KaiBor s We Are SM Married and 

' ^ u ^' B t h ntter</WwaTheyateo 
fa« toauthor Bernard MacLaverty 
. Wnk Panther Showfrt 

2-00 Omnibus edition (r). 

aJKI-FUnc The Tamarind Seed (1974) 
nerring Omar Sharif, Jube Andrews and 
■ AnttanyOuayte White holidaying in 
Bffltjados. a prim British widow, who has 
access to confidential Home Office 

information, fate for a Russian military J 
. attache, and their ensutog romance 
causes consternation throughout the 
nval intelligence organisations. 
Reasonable hmeMKar which is ready a 
gentto romance masquerading as a 
_ spy thndef. Directed by Blake Edwards 
5.05 All ourCttWren: Using Th err 

Talent JuA Dench narrates the series 
about how talented children round 


&35 Open Untoarsty: Maths—Shrinking 

- • Potygons7.00HalogensandNoble 

Gases7.2> Calculus: Geometric 
Vectors 7ii0 The Shape of Cars To 
Come 8.15 Raising Sons and 
Daughters &40 Light, the Recorder 9.05 
Learning from the Bax: The Context 
9-30 Inner City Story: The Docker 955 
The Other Virtuosos 10^0 Biology: 
Digestion 1045Maths: Modelling Stock 
Oxitrol 11.10 Patterns of Diversity 

11.35 Rabtxts and Chafe Grasslands 
12.00 The Changing Countryside: 

- Why Protect the Past? 1£25 Ecology: 
Managing Landscape 1£50 Open - 
Day at Walton Hal) 

1.00 Ecology. A look at the pine beauty, a 
moth which is nowbecoming apest in 
the north of Scotland, thanks to the 
introduction of tbelodgepoiepme, a 
native of North America 
1 25 Grandstand introduced by Steve 
Rider. The line-up is (subject to 
arferatian): 1-30 and 4.40 Show 
Jumping: the second part ofthe World 
championships tram Stockholm h» 
which the top four ridsrsndeeach " 
others horsey 2.10,a5<S and 5.40 .* 
Motorcycfinfl: the Shell Oris Brrtsh 


‘ encoura S ed to develop 

5-55 The Great Picture Chase. 

•jnjnted to spend £500 of the 
BBC'S money on si original work of ad, 
. Kate Adie bends the rules and opts 

ho* far a pictue but a pot. Working 

through her wardrobe of summer 
frocks, Adie goes to the V & A for an 

expert briefing and to Somerset eafla 
on John Leach, the boshy toa dad 

fftoidson at the lagaodery Bernard. 
Reading further afield to Wales and 
Devon, she caste h® sharp 


reporter's eye over s range of pots. fCeafw 

sonw eteganay tradfoonS.others 10 JOS Mews w 

frankly pretentious.The prices vary lO^OEvarvm 


8.05 Black adder the TWrd: Sense and 
Senifity. The amoral Edmund continues 
to plot and plan his way through 
history (rt. {Ceefax) 

8^5 FHm: Who WHI Love my Chfidren? 

(1983) starring Ann-Margret and Frederic 
Forrest. Factuatty-baaed. award- 
winning tetorison fflm, sat in Iowa in the 
1950s, about a loving mother of 10 
who discovers ahe is dying of cancer. 
Rafactant to leave her children in the 
care of an impersonal state system, she 
starts her search for good adoptive 
tamtes. Directed by John Erman. 



Investigating the pet: Kate Adie (fcttpm) 


elarmtogly and part of the fascination 
- of the show is. seeing how themagic 
figure of £500 can be Teconcfed with 
an object vwrih collecting. The pols lake 
some upstaging but Adie la the star, 
smiling mud) more than aha does when 
- reporting from the world's hotspots, 
and dearly on top of the subjeot. She 
sets a high standard for those 
following her in future programmes, 
among them Toyah Wilcox. Ian 
l-fetop and David Gower. (Ceefax) 

6J25 News with Moira Short. Weather 
£40 FesthraL Bill Oddie visits 

Cheltenham's International Festival of 
Music* (Ceefax) 

7.15 All CreaturesGreat and SmaS: The 
New World. James Herriot's Yorkshire 
vets again double as social workers 
whan James faces problems witha vain 
and lazy farmer who refies on his 
wife and son to save Nm from exertion 
(r). (Ceefax) 


6-30 One Man and His Dog. The Welsh 
- ' heat of the BBCtv In tematiorid 

. Sheepdog Championships, with 
three shepherds -Glyn Jones, WSKarn 
Watkins and Alan Uoyd—putttog 
their dogs through their paces in the 
- h*s of theOerbysNre Peak District 
Presented by PM Drabble with Eric 
HataaM 

7.15 Rough Quktoto the Worid. - 

Magenta de Vine and Sankha Guha visit 
Buenos Aires in Argentina, a dty rich 
to culture but deep in confusion, with 
stalk contrasts between the poto- 
ptaying efita and fin much larger group 
of impoverished people struggling to 
suwiveLThia remains a w al ch a ble 
programme, but more on ecoount of 
the pfaces- rt visits and the images it 
finds than because of any shutting 


grartoprfefromDa 
Water Skting:the i 


febergEtaopean 

Lincoln 


8.05 The Late Show. Repealed 

heights from the arts and media ■' 
p ro gr am me. Design critics Stephen 
Baytey, Jonathan Gtencey and Martin 
- •; Pawley argue about the perfect car; 

artist Simon Ltoke exptatos vrtiy he 
. -. paints exact reproductions of - - 

.. advertisements: and there is a series of 
one-mtouiaffims spectaffy 
' commissioned far the show 
9.05 Joseph Campbefl and thePower of 
r ’• Myitt The Meaning of Myth. '' 

" -Cdrittoiting the series in which 

Campbefl talks to American joumakst BUI 


10.(K News with Martyn Lewis. WeathBr 
10.20 Everyman: Who Kflled Vincent 
Chin? 

• Vincent Chin was a Chtnese- 
Amencan working to the motor industry 
in Detroit. Ceiebrattog his 
forthcoming marriage to a night dub, he 
got into an argument with a white 
car worker and was beaten to death 
with a baseball bat. The assailant 
insisted that the kifing was the result of 
a drunken brawl. He pleaded gudty 
to manslaughter and was put on 
probation. The Asian community was 
outraged, convinced that Chin had been 
the victim of racial hatred. It was 

suggested that the attack was revenge 
on orientals far causing a depression 
in the American car industry. This 

cogent reconstruction, beskl on the 

testimony of fearing partidpante 
including the latter. covers the five- 
year battle of Chin’s family and friends 
to secure what they regarded as a 
just verdict British viewers will be struck 
by the extraordinary long* 
windedness of the American legal 
system and the surprising 
wftfingness of those involved to court 
proceedings, from the judge 
downwards, to talk freely about them on 
tel ev i si on. 

11.10 The Days and Nights of Molly 

Dodd. American comedy senes starring 
Blair Brown 

11.35 You and 92. Alan Watson and Dick 
Taverns examine the possible effects of 
1992 on where you live 
12.10am Mahabharat Episode 17 (r) 

12^0 Weather 


Moyers about the insights he has 
gleaned from a life-tong study of ancient 
myths. He explains the sense of 
mystery and vision that myths give us, 
and looks at their capacity to guide 
and teach. Campbefl also sparks of the 
deferences between world religions, 
in particular the rotes of God and nature. 
(Ceefax) 

9.45 British Motorcycle Grand Prfx. . 

Highlights from Donington, featuring the 
500cc World championship battle 
between Kevin Schwantz and Wayne 
Rainey. Plus visual reports on the 
250cc. 12Scc and Sidecar World 
championship races. The 
commentators are Murray Walker and 
Barry Nuttey 

10.20 Movtadrome. Alex Cox introduces A 
Wedding (1978) starring Geraldine 
Chaplin, Mia Farrow and Vittorio 
Gassmaa A nouveau riche American 
east coast society wedding turns 
into a disaster for the couple when no 
guests arrive at the reception, a 
grandmother is dying in one of the 
upstairs rooms, the doctor to drunk 
and an unexpected pregnancy is 
announced. Almost aH the 
characters involved in the wedding 
arrangements are racist, greedy and 
totaly unsympathetic, making for a hard¬ 
hitting social satire. Directed by 
Robert Altmaa (Ceefax). Ends at 
1230am 


rrv LONDON 

5.00TV-am 

8.00 TV-am Reports introduced by Geoff 
Meade and UsaAziz 

9-25 F#n: Double Switch, part one (1986) 
starring George Newbem. Elisabeth 
Shue and MieftaeiDes Banes. 

Updated Disney version of Mark Twain's 
The Pmce and the Pauper. Directed 
by David Greenwalt 

10.15 Tito Camptoeft 

10.45 Link. Voldi and Ctare Gailans. who 
are both Hind, tab about the opposition 
they encountered when they 
decided to marry and have children 
11 DO Morning Worship from Si Peter's 
Church, Boughton Monehefcea. Kent 
12.00 Heartland. The Rev Professor James 
Whyte talks about 1988. the year he was 
moderator of the Church of Scotland 
1230 The Care Beans. Cartoon senes 
1235 LWT News and weather 
130 News with Brenda Rowe 1.10 An 

invitation To Remember. Robert Mortey 
reminisces 

1.40 Film: The 39 Steps (1959) starring 
Kenneth More. Barry Jones and Tara 
Elg. A feeble remake of Hitchcock s 
sparking Thirties version of the John 
Buchan chase thrfler. technicafly 
more polished but otherwise with Utile to 
commend rt. Directed by Ralph 
Thomas 

330 International Rugby. Highlights ol 

yesterday's second rugby union 
international between Argentina and 
England in Buenos Aires 
430 Royal Champion: Queen Elizabeth 
the Queen Mother and Her Horses. As 
the Queen Mother reaches her 90th 
birthday, a second showing of the 
programme which looks at her love 
of horses and horse racing. (Oracle) 


CHANNEL4 

6.00 Transworld Sport (r) 7.00 

Gardener's Calendar (r). (Teletext) 7.30 
Once Upon a Time... Ufa. 

Cartoon series about the human body 
and its defensive system 8.00 Early 
Bird 835 David the Gnome 8.55 
Ramona 

935 Band Baja. Asian music series 

10.00 Japan: The Electronic Tribe. A 
repeat senes of four programmes 
looking at Japan from a British view 

11.00 Storywheel for both deaf and 
hearing children (r) 11.30 EHy and 
Jools. Drama about a ghosi and the 
human who befriends her. 

12.00 The Waltons 1.00 Land of the 
Giants. Science fiction adventures 

2.00 Film: Outcast of the Islands (1951. 
b/w) starring Trevor Howard. Ralph 
Richardson and Robert Moriey. Carol 
Reed's creditable stab, helped by 
strong acting, at a complex Joseph 
Conrad novel about a trader who twice 
betrays a friendship and is left toa 
suitable fate. 

3.50 AH Thai Bach. Interpretations of 
Johann Sebastian Bach take many 
forms and this celebration of the 
composer features world-renowned 
artists demonstrating the diversity of 
his music, included are Keith Jarrett. 
Christopher Hogwood and the 
Academy ol Ancient Music, the 
Canadian Brass and the National 
Tap Dance Company 

435 The Nat King Cole Show (b/w). 

Joining the greet baBadeer are Peggy 
King. Cornel Wilde and Bitty Preston. 

535 News summary and weather 


530A Kind of Living. Dour sitcom 
starring Richard Grifflhs 
6.00 All Clued Up. Game show 
630 News with Brenda Rowe. Weather 

6.35 LWT News and weather 

6.40 Castle's in Europe: Spain -To Be 
a Pilgrim. Roy Castle treads the ancient 
pilgnm route in northern Spain which 
takes him to the shrine of St James the 
Apostle in Santiago de Compostela 

7.15 Jimmy's. ReaHife medical dramas 
from Europe’s largest teaching hospital, 
St James's in Leeds 

7.45 Forever Green. John Alderton and 
Pauline Collins star in the drama series 
about a family who move to the 
country for the sake of their daughter, an 
allergy sufferer (r). (Oracle) 

8.45 News with Richard Bath. Weather 
9.00 LWT Weather 

9.05 The Queen Mother in Person. 

• fTN's 90th birthday tribute Is royal 
family television in the traditional mould, 
complete with the impeccably 
tasteful Sir Aiastair Burnet, No Spuing 
image rudery here. The woman of 
the moment takes Sr Alistair and the 
camera crew on a strott round her 
favourite garden at Royal Lodge. 
Windsor, pausing to reflect on her 
times there as consort to George VI and 
mother of two young princesses. 

This amiable con v er sa tion, hardly an 
interview, is supplemented by a 

detailed retrospect of her birthday year. 
There is also a brisk biographical 
portrait, picking up on her childhood in 
Scotland, marriage to the young 
Duke of York and the abdication which 
made her an unexpected queen. As 
they watch it all. viewers vtfll doubtless 
speculate on the Queen Mother's 
longevity and wonder whether to put it 
down to a life which, excludng the 


530 Cycling: KeUogg's Tour of Britain 
1990. The last stage—a 120 mite leg 
from York to Manchester 
6.30 The Cosby Show. Brisk domestic 
comedy senes starring Bill Cosby 




Against all the odds: Ben Bowtby (730pm) 

7.00 Equinox: The Nuts and Bolts of 
Ben Bowlby. 

• Ben Bowtby is an engaging young 
man ol 23 who has overcome the 
handicap of dyslexia to take a 
degree in engineering and pursues 
promising career as a designer of 
racing cars. He is even compared with 
the late Cohn Chapman of Lotus, 
although the programme offers no 
independent substantiation lor this 
very large clam. Patrick Uden s film is 
less about science, the £qumox 
brief, than a portrait of a scientist who 
has made it through an unorthodox 
route. Talking virtually non-stop. Bowlby 
is shown with Ins grandfather, the 
child psychiatrist John Bowlby. 
gathering expertise from the Lotus 
factory m Norfolk and carrying out tests 
at Snetterton. The film also 
condemns an educational system which 
fails to gel the best out of chHoren 
such as Ben. who are too easily 
dismissed as shy. rim or 
undisciplined. (Teletext) 


The birthday tribute: Queen Mother (935) 

16 years of her husband’s reign, has 
been relatively unstressed, or sntply to 
a relaxed and sunny temperament. 
(Oracle) 

10.05 Tales of the Unexpected: A 

Harmless Vanity. A wife tracks down 
her husband's mistress but Ihor 
meeting is not at all what she expected 
(r). (Oracle) 

10.35 Red Empire: Enemies of the 

People. The worthy, unexciting history 
of the Soviet Union reaches Stalin's 
terror of the 1930s. 

1135 Fifth; The Legacy (1978) starring 

Katharine Ross. Roger Daftrey and Sam 
Elbott. An American designer, invited 
to her employer's British mansion, walks 
into a strange world of unexplained 
deaths and occult ceremonies. Banal 
honor story, directed by Richard 
Marquand. Followed by News hearflines 
135 The ITV Chart Show (r) 

235 Pick of the Week 

2.55 Rim: The Salamander (1981) 

starring Anthony Quinn, Franco Nero 
and Christopher Lee. An Italian 
colonel fights to prevent a fascist coup 
Directed by Peter Ztoner 
5.00 ITN Morning News. Ends at 6.00 


8.00 Beyond the Groove. The late David 
Rappaport, playing Sir Harry Blandfard, 
continues his musical odyssey 
across the United States, reaching the 
Cajun country, where he meets 
k. d. lang. Bob Geldof, Lyle Lovett and 
the Dirty Dozen Brass Band 
8.30 Film 4 Today: The Muscle Market- 
Continuing the season of outstanding 
BBC dramas from the 1970s is Alan 
BJeasdale's early play about Danny 
Duggan, a man whose rough- 
handed business methods are about to 
get him into a great deal ol trouble. 
Starring Peter Posttethwaite. Terence 
Rigby, Philip Donaghy and Alison 
Steadman. Directed by Alan Dossor 
10.00 American Bowl '90. Ffcghhghts ot 
the American Bowl from Wembley 
between the Los Angeles Raiders 
and the New Orleans Saints. The 
Raiders are one ot the best teams m 
NFL history, while the Saints have had a 
more chequered past. This game is 
part of the pre-season games in which 
the coaches have a chance to see 
how new players could frt into the 
framework. This means the big stars 
are unlikely to get the play they are 
usually given, but winning is still 
important and this is likely to be a tough 
battle, introduced by Mck Luckhurst 
with reporter Gary imtach 
12.00 Film: Cairo Central Station (1956. 

b/w) starring Youssel Chatline and Hind 
Rostom. Tins offering from Egypt is 
about a newspaper seller who both lives 
and works at a tram station. His 
fascination tor a lemonade seller 
eventually turns to obsession, 
despite her bemg engaged to a porter, 
leading him down a dangerous path 
of confusion. Directed by Youssef 
Chamme. French dialogue with 
English subtitles Ends at 1.30am 




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Wradfe* 7.00 Newsdesk 730 Jazz tor the 
Asking 830 News 639 24 Houk News 
Summary 630 From Our Own 
C«fesno«tefit 8.4S Book Ctxace 830 Wave 
Gmde 930 News'939 WbrdsOI Fsi&i 9.16 
Muse tor a Write 1&00 News 1039 FVMew 
oi me British Press 10.15 Journey to the 
Cwifie or me Earth 1030 Fmancai Rewew 
1040 Book OXKfl IOAS Short Story 11.00 
News Summary 11.01 Science n Aden 
1130 Mxh Magazine 1133 Travel News 
12.00 Nawa 1239pm News About Bnwn , 
12.16 048 Letter Box 1230 The Ken Bnroe 
Show 130 News Summary 1.01 Plsyoi tne 
week Z30 Nows and 24 hoots on Sunttoy 

2 45 Sam Roundup 330 nmIS ummary 

3 Oi StoiWs Anwnca 330 Aryrtwg Goes 
400 Nowarefll 4.15 BBC Enotoh 430 
NachreMan 4.40 Gemwn Friaturea 439 
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Brrtatfi 5.15 BBC Engbsti 530 Uxidret SMr 
6 .U news Heodtines 6.15 648 tJtiertxw 
630 Nadwaaen 6.40 German Faatuws 

7 54 Nachndwen 830 News Sere nely 6.01 
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America $30 Morgamagaai 5 36Ne wain 
German 5*5 "L 

French 5.47 Pnm* RawJwRS2TI» Weakon 

6*8 556 Weather Travel 


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12 00 Superstars ol wiesftng 130pm fie*- 
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630 The Secrel Video Stew 7.00 ft June 
Sired 830 Mr Horn lOOO Star Trek 1130 
world News 1130 Erterteewent Thai Week 
1230am The &B Valley 

SKY NEWS 

Nows 6n (he hour Hrmnt. 

530wn The Reportaft 630 Frwfc Wugr* 
Trxs weak 830 E rt »lanflientTmsW» 

1030National CJalwy 11.30 The &« TO* 

or wn 1230pm Those was ihe toys 1 ^ 

The BmiOrlOS 230Frank Bough Tto Week 

330 The Gre&i Wa« oi wn 
UaBeiy 530 Tno» Vnm «» D*f*J£0 
tntHfanmenl Tl»Week 730TheHapoifr 
«s 330 .Com 930 These WW »» toys 
1030 Tire Reporter* H30 Copt KSOn 
rix>» Wareiha Dm* 130 got »23D Jha 
Heporore330 Frank Bough The Wa* 430 
Those wwamo.Days 

SKYfiWVIES 

230pm The Wart of Sprti J «nd:Thi» 


pjJam wootner 
730 Confli: Home and Abroad 
■ . " (newMoaa). Elgin - 

programmea featuring music 
by tna.iBttvcentury composer 
and by hte marty imrtators, ’ 
who adnxred his “perfect and 
oewnentog nennony «. 
Concerto Grasto r .Qp 6 No 1 
(PHtoarmonia Baroque 
. Orchestra under- McGegan); 
Tno Sonata, Op 2 No 9 
. (Engfesh Concert under 
Pkmock): Stradella (Sonata di 
I viote: Parley of instruments: 
Peter Holrah and Roy 
Goodman) 

730 News 

735 Beaux Arts Trio (new series). 
The first of four programmes 
featuring recordings ot mtisic 
performed by the Trio smoe 
1955. toefudes Beethoven 
(Variations, on ich bin der . 
Schneider Kakadu. Op 121s); 
and Mendelssohn (Piano Trio 
in D minor. Op 49) 

830 News 

835 Your Concert Choice: 

. Featuring Handal, arr 
Beecham (The Origin of 
Design: LPO under Beecham); 
Haydn (Nocturne m F, H B 28: 
The Music Party, wider Alan 
Hacker, clarinet). Hummel 
(Concerto in B minor. ECO 
under Thomson, with Stephen 
Hough, piano): Schubert 
fSta&at Malar, DJ75: R1AS 
Chamber Chofr; Berlin RSO 
under Marcus Creed); and. 
Tchaikovsky (Souvenir de 
Florence: I Musks de Montreal 
under Yuli Turovsky) 

1030 Prom Talk: Mitfaef Hafl with 
guest Diana BurreU, whose 
Arched Forms wth Betts 
reoaves its world premiere 


1130 Ecossase: BBC Scottish SO 
under Jerzy -Maksymwk. with 
Lvttia Mordkovnch. vXXfn, 

- .performs BertKK (Overtime, 

Rob Roy); Bruch (Scottish 
Fantasia); Debussy (Marche 
Ecossatse), Mendelssohn 
(Symphony No 3. Scottish) 
1235pm Fretwork: Paul Ntehofson,. 
organ, performs WSam Laws 
(Consort suite a 6 No 5 te F, 
-for the viote"); PUrceH . 
(Fantaztes m three pans, Nos 
1 aid 2i m four peris. Nos 7 
and 8; Fartazteonone note, 
in rive puts; Two In nommes 
. in GiMMr, in sound seven 

' parts): Lewes (Pavan and two 
airs wrthdtirisioqs tor ■' ■ 
and two bass viols); PiseeO 
(Fantazas In four parte. Nos 5 
- and 11: Volwitary top minor, 
lot organ); Lawes i Consort 
suite a 6 to C minor “far Ihe" 
vw8s"). includes l.iOtotavai 

reading (r) 

(T90BV Director JUovrto as limsfrt 

nmamaDcaiiriysniytour ' 

4.00 bate with an Angsl (1967): Angel 
uw*eea«fiy bods in Mfptitei'Kngms. 
swmmigpooiand hefatentom. Htewrer, 
ttM present* some pfobtoraa wdh f» 
toncee w*x> is unrtenrtandafaly upsei a* Ns 
nuoluemenl witn tiie winged wonder. Also 
starring Eraranuele Bead with PfXMbe 
Catos and De«td ftABB • 

630 Pokes Aeadoiiw 5: Assi gnme n t 
Miami Beach (1966): The bumbbng pefee 
squad become* nvoked with a gang of 
met tones m Menx. Thar toggage is 
popped tar toa hags of the crooks Bid 
upresnous, tougnpacked. adrenuxB en- 
suat. Stanmg BubOe Snxm. Dma Graf and 
MohaNWnfllDw 

8.00 The Rescue (1987T Two US'AirFaree 
pilots are (fxrt down over North Korea and 
captured When ttegowrvMM Mums to 
get involved, a saK-tomiad team of An Fane 
ksfs decxws to rescue trie* dads There a 
some supar pamne artxxne action hot toe 
Bargain Stamng Keren Dion. Onsua 
Hbjws. Marc Pnce and Nad Vaugtn 
'1080 Oiasgaous Fortune (1967).' fate 
Mder B«d ShNtoy Long awtar« town, 
anoniae wtodfloowar to ftae imibat horrar 
mat uiay'M baan Ajpsdby muamaman.- 
They deed*.to taam up to. pkit.ttte 
revenge Hetewr, when theloverappBant- 
lytties nahugaaxptoBcn, ttwga gat more 
m n p k ca tad as toe gala find tote ae lMti 
oared up Wift^Ihe OA. KG&andal rnamar 


135 Russian Songs: Paata 
Bumhutad 2 e. bass, and 
Mama Beridze, piano, perform 
Rachmaninov (Seven Songs); 

LuHaby; Serenade: The Fieid- 
•• Marshal) (j) 

Z45 Ceftxdabie Conducts 

Bruckne- Symphony No 7 in E 
TMumchPO) 

4.05 Eder Quartet-Dyofak (String 
Quartet No 14 in A Rat. Op 

Mo.sa, RedtaL Waiter Klien, 
piano, performs Mozart 
(Fantasia in C minor. K 457); 
Jtetefiek (Sonata in E fiat 
mmor. 1X 1905); Schubert 
(Sonata in A, D 959) 

. 6.15 Opera News 
7.00 Stabat Mater By Domenico 
Scarlatti. Performed by BBC 
Smgers under Simon Joiy 
730 Proms 1990 

• No need now. or ever, for 
that matter, to talk 
- - - -patromaingly about tonight's 
music-fnafefs. the National 
Youth Orchestra of Greet 
Britain. They are up there with 
the very bek, not only in the 
sound they make, but also in 
me boldness of their 
programmm (tomght: 
Slrauas's Abo Spract?' 
Zaratuustra. Ravel's Porno 
Concerto for left hand, with 
Joanna MacGregor as sokxst, 
and—a London debut for a 
wock written 12 yearn ago— 
Gies Swayne's Pentecost 
Mustek Swayne's painting 
(same title) is to the BBC's 
invaluable Proms 1890 
booklet Not a bad idea to 
study it wfete you listen. 

&45 Pool of the Month. Craig 
Pane. Cttve WBmer talks to 
the poet about his works 
inducting the Bxetto to-tfgel 
Osborne's opera The 
Electrification of the Soviet ' 
Union 

1035 The Virtuoso Ce&o- Stephen 
Isserte. ceBo. and Maggie 
Cole, harrachord. perform 
Boccherini (Sonata in G, G 5: 
Sonata in C minor, G 2b; 
Sonata m C, G 6) (r) 

1035 City of London Sirrlorria: 
Richard Hickox conducts 
Poole (Woodseapes); Barrel 
(Landscape) end Hopkins 
(Stofoma) - 

1135 Bach: Eight Leipzig Cantatas. 
Cantata No 0, Lobster Gon, 
wenn werd ich sterben? 

Parfomted byBoch Ensembte 
under Joshua fftfkin. with 
Ju&anne Baird, soprano; Alan 
Fast, countertenor, Frank . 
KeSey, tenor. Jen Opaiach. 
Dess 

12.00 News 1235am Oose 


of craxy goregacn occur. Stoning Polar 
Coyote and Robert Prosky. 

11.45 The Club (1900): A drama « to an 
AiartfenfeottaalckibmlMboume. where 
nemsfl swuggias ant petty name me 
dfeTnay threaten n pul toe team opart 
Stamng Frank Wfcon. Jack Thompson and 
Alan Cassatt 

130 Might Moves (1975V Gene Heckman 
store aa an atootoatt ptoyer tinned jmte 
d woctiv e who spends tire working trows 
Stthng out divorce depuunts, dreng 
nmaways and traang rnwng poreens. 
However, in rind-toemfl We a about to 
end wneo ne is hired by a tamer actress to 
track down her tn nit fasome doughtor. in 
this modam An 

4 JJO Hope end ©ory p987)i wow war 
Two seen through toeeyosoran EngWi boy 
win finds advoitwe m toe 8MZ- Stompg 
Sarah Mies and Sebastian Sen Edwards 

EUROSPORT 

tOfan As &y One SJOFoottte Bl30 Judo 
1030 Taro Wald Sport 1130 Boxing 
12J» during S&gazre 1230pm Bmapot 
&00 Australian Rises Footoett 7.00 Uowt- 
toroawng SJ30 Tams 930 Motareyrtng 
« 30 &ytt*U«rasai 

SCRSNSPORT 

5em Golf—Ttta Belpan Lamas'Open &QO 


LW (b) stereo on FM 
535am Shnptog Forecast 630 
News BrieNig; Weather 

6.10 Prelude (s) 

630 Monwg Has Broken (a) 635 
Weather 

7.00 News 7.10 Sunday Papers 

7.15 On Your Farm. Oliver Walston 
visits Sir Richard Body MP on 
he (arm to Berkshre 

7.40 Sunday, ind 735 Weather 
8. DO News 8.10 Suidey 
Papers 

830 Appeal by David Biunkett MP 
on behanot Electronic Aids for 
the Blind 835 Weather 
9.00 News 

9.10 Sitoday Papers 

9.15 Letter From America, by 
Alistair Cooke 

930 Morning Service: from 
Battywteter Presbyfensn 
Church. County Down 

10.15 The Archers 

11.15 News Stand: Liz Forgan 
reviews the penodcsis 

1130ftckof the Week. With David 
Owen Norris (s)(rt 
12.15pm Desert (staid Discs: Sue 
Lawtey with Professor Se 
George Porter (s) (r) 1235 
Weather 

130 The Worid This Weekend 135 
Stepping Forecast 
2.00 Gardeners' Question Time: 

From Brussels, Belgium 
230 Ptay: Showtog Promise. By 
Dave Sbeasby. Marjorie is 
rurming out of cash to 
complete her creative writing 
coursa, so the arrival of Harry 
could prove useful. With 
Heather Stoney as Marjorie, 
Gerry Kersey es Brian. John 
Sranwe# as John. Lorraine 
Peters as Jean. Daphne 
Oxen ford as Florence, and 
Graham Roberts aa Harry (s) 

3.15 Norfolk Man: John Timpson 
introduces the county of 
Norfolk through people who 
kve and work there. Pari 5: BID 
Makin. founder of Pensthorpe 
Waterfowl Trust and Nature 
Reserve (s) (r) 

330 How Far Can You Go? Barry 
Norman hosts a discusswn 
about art and sacred issues 
with guests including John 
Cleese, Fay Weldon, Martin 
Scorsese. Arnold Wesker (r) 
430 News; A Voyage of Discovery: 
In the second of four 
programmes, writer John 
Mortimer looks al some great 
operatic characters toewamg 
Carmen and Fafetaff (s)(r) 

43S The Biter Bit: By Wfloe CoBns, 

read.lv John Rowe (r) 


530 News: Ra di o Live s. Six 

portraits of great radio figures. 
3: J.B S Haldane, the scientist 
who was a familiar radio voce 
in the 1930s. through lo Ihe 
1950s. Presented by Professor 
John Durant (s) (r) 

5.40 To the Back of Not Very Far 
Away: 10 comic tales of 1960s 
Me read by Anton Rodgers. 
The Futt Quarter. Explonng the 
Jordanian desert by camel 
(Part 6) (b) 530 Shipping 
Forecast 5.55 Weal her 

6.00 News 

6.15 Feetfcack. Chris Dunkley airs 
viewers'comments and 
sugg e stions about BBC 
programmes and policy (rf 

630 Special Assortment: Conflict 
in Kashmir. Mark Tully reports 
from fndra and Kashmir on the 
threat to peace to the sub¬ 
continent (r) 

7.00 Cat's Tails. Jufe Mayer 
cormnues her exploration of 
the River Thames (s) 

730 A Good Read: Helen Lederer 
and Write Rushron choose 
four paperbacks (r) 

830 Punters: An opportunity lor 
listeners' to report on tile's 
problems, injustices and 
Quirks (r) 

8.40 Reading Aloud: Let Me Put It 
In, ft Feels Alt Right from 
Pamela Des Banes's memons 
I'm with the Band (s) 

9.00 News: Enquire Within. Ditty 
Barlow attempts to answer 
listeners' questions (r) 

9.15 The Natural History 
Programme: The electrical 
secrets ol leaves 9.59 
Weather 

10.00 News 

10.15 With Greet Pleasure: David 
Lodge presents a selection of 
his favourite poetry and prose 
is) (r) 

11.00 The Litmus Test Luhl-hearled 
science quiz with Michael 
Scott (e)(rt - 
1130 Seeds of Faith: Ian Bradley 
looks at the Christian's 
response to concern Jor 
creation and the environment 

(s) 

12.00-1230am News ind 1220 ■ 
Weather 1233 Shqopmg 
Forecast 

FM as LW except: 7.0D-8.00am 
Open Unrversriy: 7.00 Modem Art: 
Vortictsm 720 Tofsloy's View of Art 
and Morality 7AQ Arts Foundation 
Course: Sudivan 135-200pm 
Programme News 530-5.55 
Programme News 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz/285m;l089kHz/275m^M-97 899.8. Radio 
2:693kHz/433m,g09kHz/330ni:FM8&902. Radio 3: 1215kHz/ 24?m. FM-9Q- 
92.4. Radio 4: 198kHz/1515m;FM-92.4-94 6. Jazz FM 1022. LBC: 
1l52kHz/26lm; BA 973. Capital: 1548kHz/194m; FM 958 GLR: 
1458kHz/206m. FM 942; Worid Service: MW 648hHz/463m. 


Powarsports Intemaloral 7.00 Uapr 
League BaaaOsl 900 Grtf 1130 Motto 
Soon ipra Tsmo330Tenpn Bontag 530 
Weekend Live Terms plus Screeropon 
Update 730 BaseoaS 830 "Go~ Dutch 
Mote Spats930weekend uwiGett 11.00 
Snto^xitoreg 


Twenty-tour hows or rock and pop 


LIFESTYLE 

1230 Coptan GftUftri 1230pm Enm 
O'Toole 130 Tom Evrefl 130 One Step 
Beyond 2.00 ChamDonehro Rooeo 3.00 
Roller Derby 400 Nortownt Passaae 42S 
Fan The Last Time l Saw Pare (t954) 6.00 
The SeSa-Vosn Shoppmg Channal 

BSB: THE MOVIE CHANNEL 

IlfOamThe Saltong Moon (1966) Star- 
mg Gregory Peck and Eva titeia Ssrol An 
army scow ancowiters a wnoa MTOnron wno 
lire Been captured Dv toe Apacru and 
nwrogas to free ner and nar tiaHtodlan son 
135pm Homefs Nest (1870) Starring 
Rock Hudson and Syria Koacme. In the 
most of Worid War Two. a darigoous 
msaron ta unoarttawn by a US any captn 


and a group oMtafcan ctakken 
430 SuTBndar (1967)- Ursucoeashti him 
fottowng me courtshto of fi noveksi played 
by Mdiael Cone and a panter plsyea by 
SatiyFBO 

6.00 An American Ted (i960): Arwnaied 
featwe about Fevef. me Mouse, wno s 
s^srated from M farrriy write mey are 
travefng to New York lo escape persecu¬ 
tion vi Russia 

030 Real Man (1967): James BetosN and 
John tenar are oui u save me worn m jusi 
tiva days n thro spoof spy nxxne 
1030 Marawen (1*7): Stamng Chns 
Cooper and James Earl Jones. The true 
story of s Twenties miners' stake n 
Maiewan. West Vxpna. s smntmgty told 
1230am Mercenary FigntBre-(t986). Swr- 
nrg tenor Fonda Wnen an mousmai roca 
ConKU wrin angent African irBOrtams. 
Con Oct breaks oul involving American 
murccnanoa Endcaf 1.55 am 


GALAXY 

7art Suparlnerxfc 730 R&Mw930BH2zard 
bond 930 The Rifleman 1030 Armrol 
Worio 1030 Kos' Court 1100 iW Ed 1130 
5uomamar 1230 Time of Your Life 1.00pm 
Ssa Hum 130 Facu ol Uta 2.00 Coal Cube: 
includes The Satehie Game-430 Teenage 
Mutant Haro Turtles 630 Grange tel 530 
Doctor wne - From me Start B30 Doctor 
Down Under 630 ih* Baal ol Staple* and 


ANGLIA 

As London except 1230pm-1.00 Farmrog 
Dory 1.10-1.40 DevHa Advocates 530- 
63OThakKre(tibtaHulk1135PrTB0ter CM 
Block H 1230am The Tw*ohi Zone 130 
Fim: The Shaieered Room 230 CmemAI- 
tractions 320 Transmssron 430 Pop Profile 
4.30-5.00 Pick of the Week. 

BORDER 

As London except; 1230pm-1.00 Here 
Come The Double Deckers 1.10 Frim: 
Btontoe Hits the Jackpot 235330 Rtin: 
Stop Over Forever 530-630 Coronation 
Street 11.35Pnsoner Cel Blot* Hi230am 
Cue Mghi t301 Spy 230 The Funny Fam 
230 Pick d the Week 3-00 The ITV Chart 
Show 430Ftfm. The Lbsi Chapter 430-530 

Jobtinder. 

CENTRAL 

As London except I230pm-1.00 Garden- 
xrg Tana 1.10-1^40 Contrasts530830 The 
A-Team 1I3S Prisoner Ce* Block H 
1235am FHm Madame Rosa 230 The ITV 
Chart Show 330 Paner Merchants 4.00* 
500 Jobtoder. 

GRANADA 

As London except 1Z2Spm-1.00 Young 
Upfront 1.10 French Conne c tion 2.10 
Rrohmood H# 3.00-330 Al Clued Up 530* 
630 Coronation Street 1135 Pnsoner Cell 
8bck H 1Z35am Ouz teght 1.001 Spy 230 
The Funny Farm230 Pick ol the Week 236 
The ITV Chert Show 335 Film. Tne Last 
Chapter 430-530 Jobfmoer. 

MTV WEST 

As London except: 1230pm-l.00 Looking 
Back 1.10 The Tvne Tunnel 230 Along me 
Cotswokf Way 230 HTV Newsweek 330- 
330 Sporting Triangles 5306.00 Watering 
1135 Prisoner Cell Block H 1235am The 
ITV Chart Show 130 The Ste Road 235 
Bedrock: Strawbs 325 Film. Tarnished 
Heroes* 4 AO330 Joofnder. 

HTV WALES 

As HTV West except 1230pm-1235The 
tnv&ttie Man’ £00 Face Vakre-230830 
Pasptctivfis 


As London except l230pnKl30 Famng 
News 1.10 Here Come me Double Deckers 
1 .*0-330 Film Why Not Stay For Breakfast 
530630 Comng of Age 11.35 Specnl 
Squad 1230am Oaz tegm 1301 Spy 230 
The Fumy Farm 230Pick of Ihe Week 3.00 
The fTV Chari Show 480 F*n: The Last 
Chapter 430-530 JcWnder. 

TVS 

As London except 1230pm-1.00 Double 
Deckers 1,10 Huckleberry Fmn end hs 
Friends 1.40 Just Ctemptai 2.10 Safetg 
with Anriaka Rce 336-330 The Spaclacu- 
br World ol Gtahnesa Records 530680 
TraAAazwB 1135 The Human Factor 
1285sn) The Law and Harry McGrow 185 
Throo 1.35 Ftm Honeysuckle Rose 360 
Out ol Limits 4.00 Jack Thompson Down 
Under 430-530 Pk* Ol me Week. 

TYNE TEES 

As London except l22Spm-i.OO Jack 


Son 730 iron Horae 600 Fred Astra 
Season 940 The Burro end Aten Snow 
10.to The Outer bnw 11.10 Sunday Mows 
Condor. 


THE SPORTS CHANNEL 

930am Sportsdesk 1030 The Contnental 
Chaltenge 12-00 National Footoei Loegue 
130 SportKtook 130 Nauonsi Foot&sl 
League 230 Rodeo 330 Baxmg 530 
Supecmss630SportsdB&k 630Austrehan 
Rugby League 730 Sportsaesk 630 The 
Uam Event Snooker/PooM O DD Sportsdesk 
includes News and weather 10.30 
Snooker/Pool - The Continental CtiaBenge 
1230 Sportsdesk 


12.00 Lmng Now 1230pm Go tar Green 
1.00 The countryside Show 200 Documen¬ 
tary M«hu- Trav«s m ctwteM An 3.00 

Sunday Matinee. Bruckner's Symphony No 5 
4 j 45 In the Frame 630Second House The 
Martha Graham Dance School 730 Brand 
830 Srauy Opera 1045 From ol House 
7.00am Ntxjiean hours to rock and pop 

THE POWER STATION 

730am toghtoen hous ol rock and pep 


Thompson Down Under 1.10-1.40 StowaJ 
530-630 Coronation Street 1135 The 
Oldest Rook* 1230am Oiu tegtn 1.00 I 
Spy 2.00 The Funny Farm 230 Pick to the 
Week 3.00 The ITV Chart Show 430 Ftan. 
The Lasi Chapter 430-5.00 Jobimder 

ULSTER 

As London except I230pm-i .00 Garden¬ 
ing Tune 1.10 The Bn hah Midland ulster 
Ratty 1.45-330 AMreftnd Hurting Serre- 
Fmal An tom v Cork 535-6.30 Coronation 
Sweet 10.05 AWrelana Hurrrrg Sorm-Feral: 
Antnm v Cork. Ottaly v Galway 11.05 Red 
Empee 12.OStan Pnsoner Cell Stock H 1.00 
I Spy 230 The Fiuxiy Farm 230 Px* to the 
week 330 The ITV Chan Snow 430 The 
Last Chapter 435-530 Jobtinder.. 

YORKSHIRE 

As London except 1225pm The Double 
Deckers 1250-1.00 Calendar News 1.10 
The Life and Tunes to Oizzly Adams 210- 
3.30 Fim: Assault on toe Wayne 530630 
The Spectacutar Worid to Grwmen Records 
11.35 Allred Htichcock Presents 1235am 
The Law and Hairy McGraw 130 Pick to the 
Weak 130 Imnsbie Man 200The ITV Chart 
Show 330 Throb 335 Liachterataai: A 
Princely Heritage 430630 Jobtinder. 


Stans: 6.00am Eariy Momng 935 Band 
Bme 1030 Storywheel 1030 EisiedOtod 
Genedtaethol Fnsnhmol Cymru. Cwro 
Rhymni 19901130 Ely and Jools 1200 The 
Waltons 1.00 TV 101 2.00 Kngdom to the 
Deep 330 Ftim. Portect Strangers* *56 
Tebaldo s Flame S00 Tne Wonder Years 
530 eyeing- Keiogg's Tour to Brrtsln 1990 
630Rygbi Rtiyngwtadol 735 O fiedwsr 
Ban 7.20 Newydtoon 730 EiStedOtod 
Ganadtaethto Frenhrool Cymu. Cwm 
Rhymrs 1990 8.15 Hel Straeon8.«5Canwn 
Motismwn 9.15 Ffiniau 935 Y Duw Byw 
9*5 Greyhoitod Racing 1000 American 
BowTS012 00 FAn: Catiu Central Station* 
1.30 Om a na. 

RTE1 

Stans: 10.10am Beats to the Heart 11.05 
Yeshua 1200 Mass 1245 The Dragon Has 
Two Tongues 1.10 Little House on the 
Prauie 1.55 News toSowed by O c lwco n the 
Wars 225 Room Outsxse 255 S^p to toe 
Tunes 335 The Angel and the Sokttr Boy 
335 Ftfm: The Princess and the Pwe 540 
News 630 The Angela 631 Rogha Na 
tense 630 Home to Roost730Murdar She 
Wrote 735 Mate Mure Mu* 930 News 
930 FUm: Hawas 1225am News 1230 
Close. 




Launrhed with sGala Concert at The Royal Festival Hail,' 
the festival will include performances by.leading concert 
orchestras and opera companinjatriany of ffitrcountry's 
most presiigioos venues ihrQBghout December 1990and 
January 1991.- [■' j 

In sddiliun, concerts will be staged throughout the 
con ouyin the superb settings of many of the nation's most 
spectacular National Trust and private stately homes:'- 
whet better way lo experience the grandeur of Mozan? ' 

Keith Prowse Hospitality,the counln's leading . . 
'corporate entertainment speef^iisu, are proud to offer 
.you the opponuhin 1 to^eajoy these splendid concertsyi 
in style. '. 

Special packages, including: the best scats in thd-? 
Jmuse, champagne and canapes, dinner and souvenir 
programmes, are available' exclusively through Keith 
Prowse. Alternatively, call to discuss an indivjdoally 
tailored evening in a National TrusrCountry House. 


KEITH PROWSE 

** • aagaog i w iiiTgg 

Tickets for this unique Festival are not available Co the 
general public onlil Ocmber, so call Keith Prowse 
Hospitality cow to arrange a trtiy memorable event Tar 
you and your guests. ]/ 

071 651 4920 
































22 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


West Africa 
states ‘set 
to intervene 
in Liberia 9 


By Our Foreign Staff 


NIGERIA and other West 
African states were reported 
yesterday to be preparing, for 
possible military intervention 
to save their citizens trapped 
in Liberia by the civil war 
there. 

A news flash on state radio 
said Nigeria and other coun¬ 
tries could not sit by while 
their nationals were trapped in 
the war-torn country without 
food, water or medical 

facilities. 

“The Nigerian government 
in concert with some other 
Economic Community of 
West African States countries 
might intervene to save the 


Berlin poll 
plan upsets 
Moscow 

From Nicholas Worrall in 

MOSCOW 

THE East German proposal 
by Lothar de Maiziere. the 
prime minister, to bring all- 
Germany elections forward by 
six weeks was poorly received 
in Moscow yesterday. 

“It is quite an unexpected 
turn of events for us.” said 
Yuri Gremitskikh. the foreign 
ministry spokesman. “The 
proposal by de Maiziere could 
disrupt the smooth work of 
the *two-plus-four formula.” 
he said. “It was agreed by all 
sides that external aspects of 
German unification should be 
decided before the official 
declaration of a single Ger¬ 
man state,” he added. 

For security reasons, the 
Soviet Union had hoped to 
reach a bilateral treaty with a 
united Germany, but early 
elections could conclude the 
unification process before a 
treaty is reached. 

• WEST BERLIN: Berlin 
was yesterday designated the 
capital of a united Germany, 
but it is yet to be decided 
whether the government will 
be located there. (AP) 

October date, page 9 


lives of their nationals caught 
up in the fighting in Liberia,” 
the news flash said. 

A senior government source 
said yesterday that Nigeria’s 
primary aim was to evacuate 
iis own nationals but that it 
also aimed to check a conflict 
that could endanger regional 
stability if it continued. 

“We have sent word to the 
warring factions that we are 
coming in. and that we want 
an immediate ceasefire,” the 
source, who declined to be 
named, said. 

Nigeria, the most powerful 
state in West Africa, was 
assembling a joint naval, army 
and airborne force with some 
involvement from Ghana. 
Guinea and Sierre Leone, for 
an operation which could start 
tomorrow, he added. 

A second naval unit was 
preparing to join the vessels 
wailing in Freetown — the 
troop carrier Ambe. which can 
carry up to 5.000 men. the fast 
attack missile boat Damisa 
and a tug. the spokesman said. 
He would not specify how big 
the foil intervention force 
would be. 

Thousands of civilians have 
been slaughtered in a vicious 
feud between troops of Li¬ 
berian President Doe's Krahn 
tribe and two rebel factions 
fighting to overthrow him. 

Civilians have been fleeing 
the capital, Monrovia, in 
increasing numbers as rebel 
fighters led by Charles Taylor 
and Prince Johnson turn on 
one another, threatening a yet 
more protracted war. 

“.As far as we are concerned 
they all have to go — Doe. 
Taylor and Johnson. There's 
been enough of their cowboy 
antics.” the Nigerian source 
said. They would have to 
make way for an interim 
administration which could 
prepare the ground for elec¬ 
tions. he said. 

Reliable sources in daily 
radio contact with colleagues 
inside Liberia said that the 
people and foreign nationals 
trapped in the country were 
becoming increasingly des¬ 
perate as food supplies ran 
oul with no end to the fighting 
in sight 


Pictorial 
tribute 
to Queen 
Mother 

THE Queen took a trip down 
memory lane yesterday when 
she opened a 90th birthday 
exhibition portraying her 
mother's life. 

The show, which has I.000 
exhibits, many of which were 
lent by the Queen, also in¬ 
cludes some rarely-seen 
photographs of the royal fam¬ 
ily. It was arranged as a tribute 
to the Queen Elizabeth the 
Queen Mother, who celebrates 
her birthday today. A large 
crowd of sightseers braved the 
sweltering heat to cheer the 
Queen as she arrived to open 
the exhibition, called Ninety 
Memorable Years, in Wind¬ 
sor’s historic Guildhall. The 
display includes a portrait sent 
by the Prince of Walesm 
which which usually hangs in 
his study at High grove, in 
Gloucestershire. 

The Queen, cool and ele¬ 
gant in a pastel blue-and-white 
dress, donned her glasses to 
peer more closely at the 
exhibitsJShe chuckled when 
she saw a 1961 photograph of 
her mother going off to launch 
a ship in a wheelchair “That's 
unusual,” she said to Tim 
O'Donovan, the exhibition 
organiser, “she wouldn't get in 
one of those now.” The Queen 
Mother had cracked a bone in 
her foot. 

Mr O'Donovan pointed out 
to the Queen that tbe next 
photograph of her mother 
showed her gamely striding 
along on a heavily bandaged 
left foot during the same en¬ 
gagement “I told the Queen 
that she did not stay in the 
wheelchair all afternoon,” he 
said. 

A more recent picture 
showed the Queen Mother 
pulling a pint of bitter. The 
large colour photograph has 
no caption. “Someone bought 
it at a car boot sale and offered 
it to the exhibition. We put it 
in because it is fon,” the 
organiser said. 

Mr O’Donovan said the 
Queen “was surprised by the 
quality of some of the old 
photographs and commented 
about bow splendid the 
dresses were”. After failing to 
recognise one person in an old 
photograph, she suggested that 
the organisers ask her mother, 
who is due to visit the show 
privately on Sunday. 

The Queen stayed 25 min¬ 
utes longer than expected at 
the exhibition, which opens to 
the public today. The display 
starts with a picture of the 
Queen Mother at the age of 



Celebration portrait: the officialpicture for the Queen Mother's birthday shows her at Clarence Hi 

Mvm hpr mniriaop tA nnnvl nu4- w w tnl amt Hi- Mr (VOoTHWaTl cn wi l a VPUT writtm lhi> Hi 


two. It covers her marriage to 
the Duke of Yoric, who went 
on to become George VI, the 
war years, and finishes with 
more recent events. Hundreds 
of photographs are inter-, 
spersed with souvenir mugs, 
cups, biscuit tins and other 
mass-produced 1 mementoes. 

Lady May Abe! Smith, a 
bridesmaid at the Queen 
Mother's wedding, lent a 


carved rock crystal and di¬ 
amond brooch, given to her by 
the Duke of York to mark the 
occasion. King Olav of Nor¬ 
way sent the organisers photo¬ 
graphs and other documents 
from the lime when the duke 
was best man at his wedding 
ui Oslo in 1929. There are also 
photographs showing the roy¬ 
al couple's honeymoon at 
Polesden Lacey, Surrey. 


Mr O'Donovan spent a year 
putting the exhibition together 
with tbe help of more than 100 
contributors. “We had a tre¬ 
mendous response.” be said. 
The project had the Queen 
Mother's blessing from the 
start. 

Dealers and collectors Bom 
all over Britain are expected to 
go to Bournemouth, Dorset, 
today for the sale of five letters 


written by the Queen Mother 
more than 70 years ago. The 
letters and one poem were 
written by the then Lady 
Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon to Pri¬ 
vate Janies Harding, a woun¬ 
ded soldier she nursed at 
Glamis Castle, near Dundee; 
during the Gist world war. 

Review, page 20 
Hope and glory, page 28 


Late jet 
boarded 
by armed 
police 

ARMED police boarded a 
holiday flight at Manchester 
Airport after angry pa ss engers 
refused to leave. The incident 
happened after the Woridways 
plane from Toronto to 
Manchester and Exeter ar¬ 
rived 15 hours late. 

The sit-in. which happened, 
on Thursday, involved up to 
60 Exeter passengers who were 
angry after bane told that they 

would have to continue their 

journey by coach. 

Martin Kimble, aged 29, a 
marine engineer from 
Mainstone, Plymouth, 
said:“We staged the sit-in 
because we were fed up. I was 
amazed when four policemen 
wearing pistols came on 
board. One of them threat¬ 
ened to arrest me but when I 
explained tbe ordeal we had 
been through he apologised.” 

An airport spokesman said: 
“We suggested that passengers 
who didn’t want to be taken by 
coach to Exeter immediately 
should be put up in an hotel 
overnight. About half the 
protesters took up the offer.” 
Police were called in by tbe 
airline's handling agents, 
Servisair, but the sit-in ended -• 
only when an airport duty 
manager arrived. 

A Greater Manchester 
Police spokesman confirmed 
an armed inspector and three 
armed constables boarded the 
plane, but said it was current 
policy for officers at the 
airport to be armed. 

Wickes Air, which repre¬ 
sents Woridways in the UK, 
said: “We deeply regret what 
has happened.” A report 
would be submitted. The de¬ 
lay was caused by a faulty fuel 
line and by the time the Tri¬ 
star aircraft arrived in 
Manchester it was too late to 
fly on to Exeter. 

• An airline .grounded fay 
the Civil Aviation Authority i* 
after its parent company went 
bust has outraged travel 
agents by continuing to accept 
bookings (Michael Horsnefl 
writes). 

Capital Airlines, which fifes 
from Leeds-Bradford to a 
variety of destinations, was 
placed in tbe hands of the - 
receiver over a month ago but 
confirmed that the list of 
12,000 people bolding tickets 
is growing through the raking 
of provisional bookings. 


August exodus, page 3 


THE TIMES CROSSWORD NO 18,364 



WORD-WATCHING 

By Philip Howard 
KOFTGARI 

a. Indian damascene-work 

b. A night janitor 

c. Honey and sal tana sweet 
DOCIMASY 

a. Teaching by rote 

b. Trial by cross-examination 

c. Scrutiny of drags 
SNOOL 

a. A wimp 

b. A pouchlike medieval bonnet 

c. To card wool 
HUFFER 

a. A long roll 

b. A publisher's publicist 

c. A waterproof waistcoat 

Answers on page 13 


C TIMES WEATHERCALlD 


ACROSS 

1 Well, I never provide illumina¬ 
tion (6,1,5). 

9 Together without any warning 
(3,2,4). 

10 See captive animal in rope 
noose (5). 

11 Film star in story about a ship 

(6). t 

12 Tbe way to draw a blank cheque 
(4-4). 

13 Confinement for women in dis¬ 
tress, hard up (6). 

15 Men serving in the force, about 
500, in an enclosure by Giles's 
bouse (8). t 

18 Crazy about f-flapper — they're 
not likely to be settled (3,5). 

19 Insurrection haring begun, 
restrictions are required to some 
extent (6). 

21 In the groove? It’s publicly 
known (2,6). 

23 Animal in naturalist's boat (6). 

26 Seafood a shilling a pound (5). 

27 One page is involved in the 
search for information (9). 

28 Dickensian character doesn’t cry 
any tears (6.6), 

Concise crossword, page 13 

Solution to Puzzle No 18358 


DOWN 

1 Shell fish reared without potas¬ 
sium (7). 

2 The laws of football as played in 
Penh (5). 

3 Aquatic bird needs a poo], say, 
with disturbed water (9). 

4 ’abitualiy stay with a relation, 
(4). 

5 I shout loudly for pudding (3-5). 

6 A business perk man is about to 
share equally (5/. 

7 Ceased being disturbed about 
father's irresponsible conduct 
( 8 ). 

8 Charged with being drunk (6). 

14 Trophy presented by horseman. 

we hear, to competitor first on a 
horse (5.3). 

16 State nominates assembly (9). 

17 The way to encourage fish (8). 

18 Casual reading lops talking (6). 
20 In that article, exercise restraint 

(7). 

22 You can gel tea from this atten¬ 
dant (5). 

24 Film star who portrayed gang¬ 
sterism and corruption (5). 

25 Concluding remarks keep re¬ 
porter very active (4). 

Solution to Puzzle No 18^363 


For the latest region by region 
forecast, 24 hours a day, dial 
0898 500 followed by the 
appropriate code. 

Greater London..701* 

KeniSurray.SLrssex- 702* 

Dorset, Hants S (OW- 703* 

Devon & Cornwall_ 704 

WHts.GtoucsAvon.Soms- 705* 

Series .Bucks,Ox on- 706* 

Beds .Herts & Essex..707 

Norlolk.Suffofc.Cambs-708 

West Mid & Sih Glam & Gwent 70S* 

Strops,Heralds & Worcs.-710* 

Central Midlands-711* 

East Midlands_712* 

Lines & Humberside... 


Dyled A Powys-.... 

Gwynedd & CJwyd- 

NW England_ 

was Yorks a Dales 


-7t3* 

... 714* 

_ 715 

... 716* 

... 717* 

- 718* 

_ 719 

720 

W Central Scotland_721 

Edhi S Rte/Lothian a Seeders 722 

E Central Scotland_723 

Grampian a E Highlands —.. 724 

.Scotland. 


N E England 

Cumbria a Lake District- 

S W Scotland.. 


NW! 


-725 


CaHhness,Orkney & Shetland 726 

N Ireland___727 

Weatharcau Is charged at 5p for 8 
seconds (peak and standard) 5p for 
12 seconds (off peak). 

'Includes pollen count 


C AA ROAPWATCH J 



For the latest AA traffic and 
roadworks information, 24- 
nours a day, dial 0338 401 
followed by the appropriate 
code. 

London a SE traffic, roadworks 
C. London (within N & S Cires.).731 

M-ways/roads M4-M1 ..732 

M-ways/roads M1-Dartford 7. ..733 
M-waysfroads Dartlord T.-M23 734 
M-ways/roads M23- M4.—735 
M25 London Orbital only.736 

Notional tr a f fi c and roadworks 

National motorways-....—737 

West Courwy.....—738 

Wales...-. 739 

Midlands__-_740 

East Angfia.-.....—......741 

North-west England. ...-742 

Nortn-east England__743 

Scotland__744 

Northern Ireland.-.745 

AA Roadwalch is charged at 5p for 
8 seconds (peak and standard) 5p 
for 12 seconds (ott peak). 


PARKER, 


A prize of a superb Parker Duofold Intemaiianal 
Fountain Pen, with an 18 carat gold rub and fully 
P)1 JOFOLD guaranteed for ike lifetime of the original owner will be 

given fyr the first five correct solutions opened next 
Thursday. Entries should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition. PO Box 486. Virginia Street. London El 9DD. The winners and 
solution will be published next Saturday. 


The winners of last Saturday's 
competition are: L Cuthbensbn. 
Rcddingtor. Road. Plymouth: R B 
Jones. Manor H ay. London SE3: J 
R .V laddicoil. Victoria Road. Oxford; 

Af Parker. Silver Street. South 

Corner. Cirencester; C D Dunham, 
De Pettys Avenue. Bedford. 


Namc/Address. 


The words "That's putting it mildly ” 
were omitted .front 21 across in 
yesterday's puzzle 


( WEATHER ) 


A weakening cold front Is 
moving sooth across tbe 
country and may bring thundery showers to southern 
England. However, the south will continue to be very hot in 
places. The rest of England and Wales will be cooler, bnt still 
dry and sunny. Scotland and Northern Ireland will be rather 
cloudy with some rain in northern and western areas. Outlook: 
cooler weather moving in from the north, but still dry and 
sunny. 

C ABROAD ) ( 

MIDDAY: t=thunder: ti-tinzxte: fg=log: 3-sun: 
slasleet sn^snow; !=tar; c-cloud; r^rski 


AROUND BRITAIN ^ 


Ajaccio 
Akrobri. 

Aiex'dria 
Algiers 
Amsrdra 
Athens 
Bahrain 
Barbads* 

Bareelna 

Belgrade 
Berlin 
Bermuda’ 

Biarritz 
Borde'x 
Brussels 
Budapst 
B Aires - 
Cairo 
CapeTn 
C'blanca 
Chicago* 
Ch’church 
Cologne 
(rphagn 

Corfu 
Ouhlm 
Dubrovnik 
Fare 
Florence 
Frankfurt 
Funchal 
Geneva 
Gibraltar 
Helsinki 
Hang K 
Inmbrck 
Istanbul 
Jeddan 
Jo'burg' 

Karachi 
L Paknas 
LeTquet 
Lisbon 
Locarno 
L Angola’ 

Luaembg 

Lusor 
Madrid 
■ danoies Thursday 


C F 
CS 84 
32 90 
30 86 
30 86 
32 90 

32 90 

30 97 

31 88 

33 91 
28 82 
27 81 

30 86 
27 81 

3 3 91 

34 93 

27 81 

19 66 

35 95 
13 55 

20 68 

26 79 
7 45 

31 SB 
25 77 

31 83 
25 77 

32 90 

33 91 
33 91 
31 88 
25 77 
29 84 

28 82 
25 77 

27 01 

28 82 

36 97 
IB £4 

25 79 
35 95 

26 79 

29 84 
22 72 
31 88 
41106 

30 65 


B Majorca 
s Malaga 
s Malta 
l Melb’me 
s Mexico C* 
s Miami* 
s Moan 
I Montreal* 
S Moscow 
s Munich 
s Nairobi 
s Naples 
S N Delhi 
s N York* 
s Nice 
I Oslo 
s Pans 
s Peking 
c Perth 
s Prague 
s Reykjvtk 
s Rhodes 
s KocteJ 
s Riyadh 
s Rome 
1 Salzburg 
s S Frisco* 
s Santiago* 
s S Paido* 
s Seoul 
S Smg’por 
S St'khokn 
s Strasb'rg 
s Sydney 

- Tangier 
S Tel Aviv 
a Tenerife 
s Tokyo 

s Toronto* 

- Tunis 

s Valencia 
I Vanc'ver* 
s Venice 
s Vienna 
5 Warsaw 
5 Washton* 
s Wel'nion 
t lunch 
s figures 


C F 
34 93 
30 86 

29 84 

12 54 
22 72 

32 90 
28 82 

27 81 
18 81 

28 82 

19 66 

34 93 

33 91 
28 82 
32 90 

26 79 

35 95 

30 88 

13 55 

27 61 

12 54 

31 88 

20 88 
40104 

31 88 
27 81 
20 68 
21 70 
20 68 

32 90 

26 79 

27 81 
31 88 
16 61 

33 91 
31 88 

26 79 
31 88 

28 82 
31 88 
31 88 
19 66 
29 84 
2S 79 
25 77 
29 84 

13 55 

27 81 



Sim 

Rain 

Max 



hi 

C 

F 


12.4 


25 

77 

Hunstanton 

13.4 

- 

31 

88 


13.6 


2b 

79 

Lowestoft 

11.5 


23 

73 

Southend 

12.7 


31 

86 

Margate 

11.7 


26 

79 

Fofesstona 

13,4 


31 

88 

Eastbourne 

13,4 



79 

Brighton 

13.4 



88 

Worthing 

BognorRogis 

13.2 

13.6 



84 

81 

Soothsea 

13.3 



86 


131 


26 

19 


13.6 

- 

31 

98 

Poole 

135 


3t 

KH 

Swanago 

13.4 


2b 

77 


13.0 


26 

79 

Telgnmouth 

13.3 


23 

73 

FafaooMBi 

123 


24 

75 

Se»y lotos 

123 


2b 

77 

Joraey 

Ub 


3b 

95 

Guernsey 

133 


32 

90 

Newquay 

126 

- 

29 

84 

Mmebaad 

125 


34 

.93 

Moracambn 

131 


33 

91 

Douglas 

140 


ai 

77 

Brnifingtam 

11.7 


33 

91 

Bristol 

128 


33 

91 

Buxton 

129 


31 

86 


129 


32 

90 

Newcastle 

13,2 


31 

88 

Anglesey 

145 


27 

m 

Cordrti 

126 


32 

90 

Cotwyn Bay 

122 


34 

93 

Aberdeen 

122 


26 

79 

Aviomote 

94 


F'J 

81 

Edinburgh 

140 


nl 

88 

Glasgow 

133 


13 

82 

Unions 

4.8 


28 

82 

Lerwick 

93 

.01 

18 

64 

Prestwick 

137 


29 

84 

Tom 

8.1 


20 

m 

Wick 

92 


23 

73 



sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 


3 These are Thursday's figures 
f f - 


YESTERDAY 


C LIGHTING-UPTIME ) 

TODAY 

London 8.44 pm to 5.30 am 
Bristol 8 54 pm 10 5.40 3m 
Edinburgh 5.15 pm lo 5.24 am 
Manchester 9.00 pm to 5 31 am 
Penzance 9.01 pm to 5.56 am 


Temperatures at mioday yesterday, c. cloud; f. 
lair: r. ram: s. sun. 

C F 
19 68c 
33 91s 
28 82s 
31 88s 
30 86s 
22 72r 
19 66r 


Belfast 

B’rmghani 

Blackpool 

Bristol 

Caitflff 

Edinburgh 

Glasgow 


Guernsey 
Inverness 
Jersey 
London 
M’nchster 
Newcastle 32 90s 
R'ntdswoy 21 70s 


C F 
31 88s 
20 68c 
33 913 
33 91s 
31 88s 


c 


LONDON 


HIGH TIDES 


JL 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridge 

105 

58 

1.19 

6.0 

Aberdeen 

12.30 

3.6 

1.11 

3.6 

Avonmouth 

637 

107 

700 

113 

Bella it 

1029 

29 

10.49 

3-2 

Cardiff 

622 

10.0 

6.45 

10.5 

Devon oa rt 

4 56 

4.6 

szte 

4.9 

Dover 

10.43 

5.7 

11 02 

57 

Falmouth 

4^6 

44 

456 

47 

Glasgow 

12 12 

4.1 

12 23 

3B 

Harwich 

11 20 

34 

71 43 

35 

Holyhead 

lO.or 

4.7 

10 17 

5.0. 

Hun 

£.42 

63 

622 

62 

Ilfracombe 

5 24 

6.3 

6.22 

6 2 

King's Lynn 

5.49 

54 

627 

55 

Leitn 

1 49 

46 

228 

4.7 

Liverpool 

10.52 

79 

11 07 

85 

Lowestoft 

8*5 

22 

9.50 

2.1 

Margate 

11.21 

42 


MHtord Haven 

5.41 

5.6 

6.01 

6.0 

Newquay 

4.34 

5.7 

4.53 

6.1 

Oban 

5 36 

32 

5 51 

3.5 

Peiuanco 

3S9 

4 6 

4.27 

4.9 

Portland 

60S 

1.5 

6.38 

15 

Portsmouth 

it 03 

4 0 

11 10 

4.1 

StKjraham 

10.51 

52 

11.05 

5.4 

Southampton 

to 41 

3.9 

10 43 

4.1 

Swansea 

540 

7.7 

6.02 

65 

Tees 

304 

4.6 

336 

4.6 

Whon-on-NM 

11.14 

3.6 

11.44 

3£ 


Yes terda y: Temp; max 8 am to 6 pm. 3SC 
(95Ft min 8 pm to 6 am.20C (88IFJ. HurrtdKy G 
pm. 34 per com. Rato: 24hr to 8 pm, nfL Surr. 24 
hr to 6 pm. 12.8 hr. Bar. mean eeo level, 6 pm. 
1.020 mUUiars, fahng. 

1.000 mfiSmraaZLSSn. 

C HIGHEST & LOWEST - ") 

Thursday Highest day terras: Bartmume, 
Hereford & Worcester, 36C (97F): lowest day 
max: Sumburgh. Shetland. 17C (63F): htoftsst 
raintait Stornoway, Outer Hebrides, 0.02 in; 

highest sunarane: Anyway, North Wales, 


MANCHESTER 


Yaattniay:_ Temp: max 6 a m io B^pm. 33C 


(91 FI: iwriS am to 6 om, 20C (88FV 
— to 6 pm, nd. Sure 24 hr to 6 pm, 1X210- 


: 24lr 


GLASGOW 


Tide measured in metres: lm=3J806tt. 

Timcs are BST 


Yesterday: Temp: max 6 am to 6 ran. 21C 
(70F). mm 6 pm to 6 am. 15C (59F). Ram: 24hr 
to 6 pm. trace- Sort 24 hr to 6 pm, 07 hr. 

C TOWER BRIDGE ) 

Tower Bndge wih be Utad at Ihefoflawtng times 
today: 545pm 10pm and 10.45pm. and 
tomorrow at l.30pm. 


TQDAf 


Sun ns os: 
528 am 


Moon sets: 

248 am 

Full Moon Auqust 6 



Sunsets: TOMORROW 
8.44 pm 


Moon rises: 

742 pm 


n 


Sunrises: 

540 am 


FuS Moon tomorrow 


Moon sets: 
3.51 am 


Sunsets: 
8.42 pm 


Moon rises: 

aifipm 


OTIMES NEW .bP* PE PS LIMITED. 1990. Published and printed by Times Newspapers Ltd 
5t t Virginia s>ir«".'i. London El 9XN. ir4MJlwne07i 782 6000 and ai 124 Ponman SUrcl. 
Ktnnine Park. Glasnow CAl 1EJ. I etc phone oil 420 1O0O. Saturday. August 4. 1990. 
Rcsuierni as a newspaper a» ilw Post Office. 


The fascinating world of the sea is 
presented in this comprehensively 
revised edition and covers every 
aspect of the ocean environment. 


THE TIMES 

ATLAS 



“An absolute must for anyone 
with an interest in the sea” 
Clare Francis 
£27.50 haidback 


Available from all good bookshops 
TIMES HOOKS 
16 Go!den Square, Eomio/i W l 


i 
























TIMES 


THE 




SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


23 


SUMMARY 




GOLF 

Douglas leads 

WITH a second round of 71, 
Kitrina Douglas (above), of 
Bristol, holds a one-stroke 
lead over Helen Alfredsson, of 
Sweden, going into the third 
round today of the Weetabix 
British women's Open golf 
championship at 

Woburn__Page 24 

CYCLING . 

Close finish 

MICHEL Demies, of Bel¬ 
gium, and Robot Millar, of 
Scotland, are neck and neck at 
the bead of the Kellogg’s Tour 
of Britain cyde race, with two 
stages remaining, from 
Bridlington to Newcastle to¬ 
day and from York to the 
finish in Manchester. 
tomorrow - Page 25 



CRICKET 



in 

_y beat India 

runs in the record- 
first Test, England 
tempted to make a 
a their team for the 
iatch of the series, at 
fiord, starting next 
f. The selectors' have 
onsidering' Philip 
(above) and Keith 
tt as an extra spin 


U l/MM 

son had an eveni- 
in at Goodwood 
e received a four- 
r careless riding 
Bamie had been 
from first place in 
ng Molecomb 
t he had a double 
an and Ahtaab, 
by Harndao AI- 
__ P!ages28^9 



determined not to 
in starting block 


Four for 
the finale 

BRITAIN’S hopes of success 
in the individual 
showjumping at the Worid 
tQocstrian Games in Stock¬ 
holm rest with the Whitaker 
brothers. Michael Whitaker 
(above) is fifth and John sixth 

after the first two phases. Only 

the top four after today’s 
jumping will qualify for the 
finale tomorrow, when foe 
riders will compete on each 
other’s horses. George Bow^ 
man, of Britain, is fifth after 
the first day erf - the carnage- 
driving cbampuuishipPftge 27 

AMERICAN 
FOOTBALL 

Double bowl 

AMERICAN football in 
Britain has its double-header 
of foe year this weekend. 
Today, at Crystal Palace, 
Manchester Spartans* claim to 
be the best in Britain is tested 
by Northants Storm in the 
Coca-Cola BowL Tomorrow, 
at Wembley, Los Angeles 
Raiders and New Orleans 
Saints contest American Bowl 
*90; their No 1 quarterbacks 
have been left at home 
because of pay disputes but 
there is still almost as much 
magic Page 26 



f!hhniiig«Hwirin ff yp pajw Adam seeking to asme his place in foe European team in foe AAA championships and selection trials today 


By Da vid Powell 

ATHLETICS CORRESPONDENT 

MARCUS Adam, the Common¬ 
wealth 200 metres champion, 
today hemes to avoid the fete 
which befell Linford Christie a 
year ago. Onthe secondday of the • 
Panasonic AAA and WAAA 
championships at the Alexander 
Stadium, Bir mingham, he at¬ 
tempts to avoid becoming a 
victim of British sprintingTs 
strength in depth. 

It was in these championships 
last summer that .Christie finished 
third in the 200 metres and failed 
to gain selection for England at 
that distance in the Common¬ 
wealth Games. The first two — 
Adam and Ade Mafe, as it turned 
out — were assured of selection 
and John Regis, foe European 
indoor champion and European 
Cup winner that year, was the 
selectors’ choice for the dis¬ 
cretionary third place; 

So Christie, having won the 100 
metres in' Auckland, was forced 
into an observer’s role when 
Adam, Regis and Mafe, in that 
order, swept up the medals. 
Adam, at 21, looked a brilliant 
prospect that day, his 20.!0sec, 
only (LOlsec outside Christie’s 
British record, benefiting from 
only marginally illegal wind assis¬ 
tance. On his return, Adam be¬ 
came the first Briton for two years 
to defeat Christie indoors, in the 
match' between Britain and East 
Germany. 

Even more impressive, it seems 
now. Adam subsequently defeated 
Michael Johnson in foe match 
against the United States and East 


Germany. Johnson has become 
one of the world’s foremost ath¬ 
letes this summer, his 19.85sec in 
the Edinburgh grand prix meeting 
last month, giving those at altitude 
in Sestriere next Wednesday every 
reason to expect a world record 
from the American. 

Meanwhile, Adam, who has yet 
to mat** his mark this summer, 
now regrets his winter conquests 
over Christie and Johnson. “It was 
a mistake. 1 tried to push myself 
too hard and my body broke 
down,” he said yesterday as he 
prepared for last night's 100 
metres. 

Hip and bade trouble means 
that he comes to Birmingham with 
barely a month's full training 
behind him and performances in 
the British grand prix meetings 
which hardly do him justice. 

While he was hoping to book his 
ticket for the European champion¬ 
ships, which begin in Split on 
August 27, in the shorter sprint, it 
is foe longer one that offers him a 
realistic chance of challenging for 
gold. 

The AAA and WAAA 
championships are foe British 
trials for Split and foe change in 
selection policy to guarantee 
places to winners only, leaving 
two to foe discretion of foe 
selectors, may work to his advan¬ 
tage. Provided he can show today 
that his 200 metres running is on 
an upward curve, he should be 
picked, no matter what Regis, 
Mafe and Christie do. 

“I have not been going well at all 
this season,” Adam admitted. 
Sixth in foe Edinburgh grand prix. 


TODAY’S FINALS 


12 JO: Women's 5.000 metres walk; 
men's hammer; men's pole vault. 
1.0: Men's 10.000 metres walk. 2.0: 
men's high jump: men's triple jump. 
2J0: Women's discus. 3JQ: Men's 
400 metres. SJ0: Women's 800 
metres. 3.40: Men's 3.000 metres 
steeplechase. 3£5: Men s 400 me¬ 
tres hurdles. 4.0: Men s long jump; ’ 
women’s javelin; women's shot 
4.05: Woman's 200 metres. A25: 
Men’s 3.000 metres. 4^0: Women's 
400 metres hurtles. 450: Men's 
200 metres. 5.0: Women’s 400 
metres. 5.12: Men's BOO metres. 
550: Men's 1500 metres. 


in 20.91 sec, and third in the grand 
prix at Crystal Palace in 20.70sec, 
lend weight to that statemenL “I 
should have taken three weeks off 
after the Commonwealth Games 
instead of going on to Melbourne, 
running there, and then coming 
hack for the indoor season.” 

He admits to foe inexperience 
of youth: “I had never been 
injured before and I have learned 
my lesson. In future 1 will plan my 
season better. I have not raced any 
300s or 400s, so my speed- 
endurance is not good. I am okay 
to 150 metres, but then 1 start 
fading. If 1 can get through this 
weekend, there should be time for 
me to get it right by SpliL” 

Phil Brown, foe hero of so many 
great British 4 x 400m relay tri¬ 
umphs, continued his education 
in foe one-lap hurdles, quafifying 
for foe final as runner-up in his 
heal in a modest 51.34sec. 

But, with only the winner of 
each event being guaranteed selec¬ 
tion for the European team, foe 


Birchfield man, who only started 
to concentrate on tackling foe 
barriers earlier this season, looked 
to have little chance of being foe 
chosen one. 

The best bet fora British victory 
in the absence of Kriss Akabusi 
looks like the evergreen Max 
Robertson, who set out on his 
quest for a fifth AAA title with a 
comprehensive 51.1 Isec win in 
his heaL 

The hot weather might have 
suited foe sprinters, but with 
temperatures soaring into foe 
nineties, there were no heroics 
from the Britons aiming to qualify 
for today’s 3,000 metres steeple¬ 
chase final. 

The conditions, though, clearly 
suited a Kenyan visitor, foe little- 
known Phillip Barkmwo. who 
carved out a solo win in 8min 
27.08sec in the first heal — nearly 
20 seconds clear of foe field. 

• A knee injury has forced Sally 
Gunnell, foe Commonwealth hur¬ 
dles champion, to pull out of the 
championships. The 24-year-old 
Essex runner strained a muscle 
just above her right knee when 
wanning up for foe 400m beats 
last night 

“It is not too serious, but I just 
thought I had better pull out as a 
precaution,” she sakLInstead. she 
will sharpen up her speedwork on 
the flat, — ruling out foe possibility 
of a showdown today with Linda 
Keough. the Commonwealth sil¬ 
ver medal winner, who was foe 
fastest qualifier in 53.20sec. 


Gaseous problem taxes the Oval 


project 
for the > 


A s if foe last Test match at 
the Oval were not suf¬ 
ficiently explosive, I hear 
that a pocket of methane gas has 
been discovered beneath the Ken 
Barrington Centre at that at¬ 
mospheric and determinedly un¬ 
lovely cricket ground. “The levels 
are not particularly high, but no 
one knows how much danger a 
small amount can cause,” Tony 
King, a director of Eve Con¬ 
struction. who are building foe 
Ken Barrington Centre, said. 

The centre. - an admirable 
for a community centre 
the young of a part of London 
that could do with such things, 
was to have been opened the day 
after foe last Test by the Queen. 
But it is behind schedule, and 
only three of foe six floor are in 
use. 

What is foe methane doing 
there? Could it have something to 
do with the gasholders? It cer¬ 
tainly could have been there for 
It has taken six weeks to 
where the gas was coming 
from: but the more urgent prob¬ 
lem is how to get rid of the stuff 

Lord’s gatecrashers 

T his column sends fraternal 
greeting to Sunil Gavaskar, 
foe former Indian cricket 
captain who refused honorary life 
membership of the MCC after 
years of unpleasantness from 
Lord's stewards. The absolute 
ghastliness of these people has 
Iod£ been a joke: Gavaskar’s 
polite and (until'the story was 
uncovered by a journo) discreet 
refusal reveals this as something 


SMO^BARNES 

ON SATURDAY 


more. Who has not suffered petty 
rudeness from these people? 
When working with Phil Ed¬ 
monds, the England and Middle¬ 
sex spinner, on his biography, I 
put up with it every time we met 
at Lord’s. Phil added a dedication 
in foe book to. officials who 
forbade him entrance to foe 
ground when be was actually 
playing. Mike Selvey, foe former 
Middlesex and England bowler, 
not a suit and tie person, prob¬ 
ably Iras foe world record for 
being denied entry to Lord’s 
when he had not only a right but a 
duty to be there. But as for foe 
Gavaskar Affair if Lord’s alien¬ 
ates as fine a batsman as we are 
ever likely to see, foe fault is with 
Lord’s, not with foe batsman. No 
sport is bigger than foe people. All 
sports are as big—or as small - as 
foe people involved in them. 

Mouse that roared 

T his column remains faith¬ 
ful to all its favourite: so 
rejoice with me at foe news 
that Julie Krone is back. Krone is, 
you will recall, the mightily 
succesful American jockey, a 
prolific winner and occasional 
slugger of her male colleagues, a 
splendid lady standing at 4ft IOin 
with a voice “like that of a 
cartoon mouse” according to one 
writer. She has been out of racing 
for eight months after breaking 


her left arm in four places, but she 
returned last week and naturally, 
had a winner in her first race, her 
1,900th career win. It was the day 
after her 27th birthday: “I’m so 
happy,” she said. “It’s not so 
much a sense of relief as much as 
— wow! I can still do it!” 

• The Lord ^-engendered row be¬ 
tween Bishen Bedi and Sunil 
Gavaskar has added little but an 
Indian gloss on the main busi¬ 
ness. However, it has worried 
David Frith, the editor of Wisden 
Cricket Monthly. He has been 
counting on both men to play on 
the same side for his Media XI 
against Tim Hudson's side on the 
rest day of the Manchester Test 
next Sunday. 

Sporting prints 

T his column recently solic¬ 
ited information about 
renaissance sportspeople: 
specifically, athletes of serious 
standard who are or were also 
painters and sculptors of serious 
standard. 1 hear of Ken Taylor, 
the Yorkshire and England crick¬ 
eter, also a Huddersfield Town 
footballer. He studied ai Slade 
and became a profesional 
cartoonist Ron Davies, foot¬ 
baller for Southampton, Ports¬ 
mouth and Wales, was, I gather. 
”an accomplished cartoonist”. 
Bobby Kellard. of many football 
dubs, was a watercolourist 
Adam Robson, capped 20 times 
for Scotland at rugby in foe 
Fifties, has exhibited at the Royal 
Scottish Academy. Philip Backer, 
13 years a National Hunt jockey, 
is a sculptor, and made foe 


bronze of Red Rum at Ain tree. 
But the cream of foe collection, at 
least in artistic terms, is Maurice 
Vlaminck. 1876-1958, member of 
Les Fauves. the group which 
included Matisse and Derain. I 
learn that Vlaminck was a weight- 
lifter and a professional racing 
cydisL He wrote, and played the 
violin as we-IL There's a real 
sporting polymath for you. 
Thanks to John A Eteson. Martin 
Woolley, John Milne and Frank 
Humphries for the info. 

No room at the top 

1 am staggered to hear that 41 
people stood on foe top of 
Everest in foe course of the 
spring climbing season this year. 
Of these, 20 were members of the 
Peace Expedition, a joint effort 
between China, foe Soviet Union 
and the Untied States. One of 
these was foe first Soviet woman 
to do so. The season also pro¬ 
duced the first Belgian ascent 
(how do Belgians learn about 
mountains 7 ) and foe first Swed¬ 
ish ascent. The mountain also 
gave its traditional grudging wel¬ 
come to Peter Hillary, son of Sir 
Edmund. It is foe first time a 
father and son have both climbed 
foe big hill. However, even this 
was overshadowed by Sherpa 
Ang Rig. who had. before spring, 
climbed foe mountain five times. 
He was in jail for allegedly killing 
a Tibetan, was bailed out by 
Spanish climbers, and went 
straight out and climbed foe 
mountain for the sixth time. That 
is another record, and one that 
will take a good deal of beating. 


Resilient Hall 
takes title in 
show of nerve 

CAROLINE Hall, aged 16. from 
Frlton. Bristol, won the English 
girls’ championship at Bolion 
Old Links and derided that she 
would not be going to college 
but would concentrate on golf 
instead. 

But Hall, foe second youngest 
winner of the title, had a 
tremendous battle before she 
beat Joanne Hockley, of 
Felixstow Ferry, at the 20th. 
She lost the first three holes and 
was four down after six as 
Hockley produced a series of 
birdies. 

Hall showed great determ¬ 
ination as she fought hack but 
was still two down with two to 
play. She won both as Hockley 
wilted under pressure and, after 
the I9ib was halved with bird¬ 
ies, Hall got borne when her 
opponent drove into rough and 
failed to find the green with her 
second, it was the climax to a 
week in which the Bristol girl 
justified her plus two handicap. 

RESULT: Rnat C HaU (Ffcon) K J Hockley 
(FakxsBMM Ferry). 20m. 


Wembley 
to host 
Hungary 

By Louise Taylor 


GRAHAM Taylor will begin his 
international managerial career 
with home advantage after foe 
Football Association announced 
yesterday that England’s match 
with Hungary on Wednesday 
September 12 had been switched 
from Budapest to Wembley. 

With the Nep stadium in Hun¬ 
gary being unavailable, foe FA 
was concerned that a ground 
offering laxer security could be 
less of a deterrent to hooliganism 
among England followers. As 
Manchester United are due to 
visit Pecsi Munkas of Hungary in 
foe first round of foe European 
Cup Winners* Cup three weeks 
later, any violence could have 
curtailed England's return to 
domestic European competition 
before it had begun. 

Graham Kelly, foe FA's chief 
executive, said: “In view of the 
delicate situation over security, we 
feel it would be safer not to go to 
one of these alternative stadia. We 
have reached a perfectly amicable 
agreement with the Hungarians 
and we will go there when we play 
them next” That is expected to be 
late in 1991 or early 1992. 

Lawrie McMenemy, Taylor's 
assistant, and Les Walker, foe FA 
security officer, who travelled to 
Budapest to look at alternative 
stadiums, negotiated a transfer to 
Wembley. An under-21 fixture 
between the two countries will 
takt» place at Southampton on 
Tuesday September 11. 

Taylor said yesterday: “We 
have worked so hard to get back 
into Europe, and it is so important 
for our clubs that we do not want 
to jeopardise things. The Hungar¬ 
ians are happy because we were 
always going to play home and 
away anyway. 

“1 think it is also important that 
the FA is not seen to be at odds 
with foe League. We are all 
football people, working towards 
the same aims. We put Wembley 
on stand-by for this eventuality.” 

Wembley officials were asked 
last month to keep the stadium 
free for September 12, and before 
McMememy and Walker had 
even boarded a plane to Budapest 
they had printed 200 VIP match 
tickets for a Hungary fixture. 

“The match is still being arranged 
at short notice, which means a lot 

of work for foe FA," Taylor said. 

“It proves the FA is concerned 
about League dubs. 

‘Personally, I am pleased to be 
playing my first match at home. 
Traditionally, September fixtures 

at Wembley do not attract foe 

highest crowds, but with England 
reaching foe semi-finals of the 
Worid Cup I am hoping this will 
be an exception ” 

The other attraction, of course, 

will be foe earliest look at Taylor’s 

first England selection, and Wem¬ 
bley should have a good 
attendance. 



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24 SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Thousands of eager boys and girls each year are coming into an unprepared and unwelcoming golfing world 



re will they 



S oon Hunstanton, and Nor¬ 
folk’s North Sea breezes, 
will be testing the teen¬ 
agers of golf in the boys’ 
amateur championship, 
starting on August 13. A week 
later, it win be the turn of 
Southerner, on the northern 
shore of the Solway Firth, to 
provide a degree examination for 
the youths in their international 
tournament. 

Lei no one doubt the impact 
which Nick Faldo's marvellous 
run will be having upon these two 
contests. Faldo, with one of the 
toughest minds golf has ever 
known, has set a mark for young 
players to aim for. just as Henry 
Cotton did for my generation 
nearly 60 years ago. 

No change in my golfing life¬ 
time has been more pronounced 
than the advance which has 
overtaken the junior game in 
Britain. 

To appreciate the extent of the 
development and the reasons 
behind it, it is really necessary to 
have seen things at first hand in 
the 1920s and 1930s. 

2 was specially placed to do so. 
Aged six at the time, 1 saw Walter 
Hagen win the Open at St 
George's, Sandwich, in 1922; at 
least, 1 saw him play the last five 
magical holes of his fourth round, 
for that was all that my father 
would allow me to watch. 

The same summer, across the 
way at Prince’s, my young eyes 
were mesmerised by a 20-year-old 
girl named Joyce Wetbered, with a 
golf swing which has never been 
surpassed, as she overwhelmed 


my hero. Cecil Leitch, by nine and 
seven in the 36-hole final of the 
British ladies' championship, and 
set a standard in women's golf. 

A couple of evenings before that 
tournament- Miss Leitch had 
asked me to play seven holes with 
her at Prince's after tea — four out 
and three back. She went off the 
men's tees and 1 off the ladies'. She 
gave me two strokes at the long 
holes and one each at the short. 
The result was academic. I had 
discovered another world. 

When I was growing up, golf at 
school — with rare exceptions — 
was discouraged. **A selfish 
game," they said. Even at Stowe, 
which has always had its own 
nine-hole golf course and been 
proud of its golfing record, I 
encountered as unexpected ob¬ 
stacle. Having played, by then, 
four times is the boys champ¬ 
ionship without success. 1 was 
looking forward eagerly to 
Carnoustie and my fifth and last, 
dying chance of victory. 

The master-in-charge of cricket, 
a former Oxford “blue", put his 
foot firmly down at the start of the 
summer term. “No golf for you 
this term,'' he said with a finality 
which brooked no protest. “It’s 
bad for your batting. Besides, 
you're captain of the XI and 
should set an example." 

My spirits sagged. With little 
more than a fortnight from the end 
of term to the start of the 
championship, our Scottish ad¬ 
versaries, who had been playing 
golf relentlessly all through the 
summer, started with a killing 
advantage. 


h> . . * 

I* 


fe *** * > 

L- .> 

P.B. ‘Laddie’ Lucas 


It was reflected in those days in 
the results. From 1921 to 1939, the 
boys’ championship was held 19 
times. On 11 occasions, a Scot 
prevailed. Add to that a victory 
apiece for Ireland and the United 
States, where they do not seem to 
have much time for cricket, and 
England was left trailing. 

Good though a lot of the boys 
were, few turned pro in those days. 
The money was not there to tempt 
them. 

A t Hunstanton shortly, 
things will be quite 
different. A dozen Eng¬ 
lish boys, hardened by 
playing competitive 
golf virtually fall time throughout 
the spring and summer—much of 
it at senior level — will reckon they 
are in with an even money chance 
of winning. Several of the good 
ones will already be regarding the 
championship as a likely stepping 
stone to a profession in the game. 

A senior international cap in a 
year or two and then, maybe, a 
place in a Walker Cup side against 
the United States, and in they will 
jump at the deep end to strike out 
for gold. Mostly they will drown, 
for between the amateur and the 
professional codes there is a 
gaping abyss which their games 


will not prove sound enough to 
bridge. 

Why, then, has it all changed in 
these last 40 years or so? The 
reasons can be shortly stated. 

1. Altitudes: Golf is no longer a 
game (in England) just for the 
fortunately placed. It is now a 
classless society which goes right 
across the social board. The Golf 
Foundation, a charity with a 
brilliant concept, has linked arms 
with the Professional Golfers' 
Association to bring the game, 
through its iwwhing fl flcws, to 
thousands of the young — girls as 
well as boys — in the schools of 
Britain, in both the public and the 
private sectors of education. 

2. Teaching: There will be few bad 
grips and stances to be seen at 
Hunstanton in the boys’ champ¬ 
ionship, for the game is now 
incomparably better taught than it 
was in my day. I saw John Jacobs, 
former Ryder Cup player and 
captain, teaching a somewhat 
recalcitrant boy of 12 one time at 
the Sandown Park Golf Centre. 
“Now come along," he said firmly 
to the boy, “you know what to do. 
Imagine you’re sitting up nicely on 
your pony. Then it's back to the 
hole, front to the hole, and swing 
your arms up and down.-Two 


turns and a swish—.But don't 
forget to swish!" 

There never was a simpler 
golfing concept for a child. And 
isn't dial, in the simplicity, exactly 
the impression Ian woosnam 
gives when he hits a golf ball? 

3. Television: Jacobs, who does 
not believe in over-teaching the 
young ("Let me see a boy oragiil 
twice a year, that's quite enough, 
provided there is continuity in the 
teaching"), will left you that the 
way for children to learn to play 
golf is by imitation — by imitating 
naturally the movement and 
rhythm of the great and the good. 
In the inter-war years, few among 
the young ever got the chance of 
seeing the heroes of the day close 
to. Now, the television and the 
video have changed all that 

They are bringing daily to 
youthftil and admiring eyes the 
likes of Ballesteros, Faldo, 
Woosnam, Jacklin and the rest 
And what benefits accrue from it! 

4. The golf bolt. Young players 
today are reared and nurtured on 
the large 1.68in diameter ball with 
all the manifest advantages in 
method and striking which this 
brings. Persevering with the small, 

1.62in diameter bail for yearn after 
the United States had switched, in 
1932, to the present large version, 
set back British and European golf 
lor a generation. 

One cloud alone hangs over the 
young's golfing scene. It won't 
much affect those who will be 
battling for honours at 
Hunstanton and Southemess. But 
it is an undeniable obstacle for the 
thousands of boys and girls who. 


on leaving school, will be looking 
for places to play. 

The private gplf dubs are often 
full with long waiting lists, and, 
anyway, the dues are too high for 
those setting out on a career. The 
public courses are crowded from 
dawn to dusk ai weekends. The 
comprehensive golf centres, with 
their floodlit driving mages, pitefa- 
and-purt, par 3 and conventional- 
length 9- or 18-hole courses - by 
far the most suitable medium for 
the pay-to-play, open-to-aU sector 
—are too few, and not understood. 

T wenty-five years ago, 
when I was president of 
the Golf Foundation, I 
made a speech at an. 
annual general meeting 
about the 20,000 boys and girls 
whom the organisation was then 
bringing into the game each year. 
Henry Longfauret was present 
“All very good.” he wrote in the 
Sunday Times the next week, “but 
where are they all going to play?” 

The question is even more 
pertinent today. Unless there is a 
resolute approach to the problem 
by the planning authorities, and a 
more understanding attitude 
adopted by the conservationists, 
the position will grow for worse. 

This underscores the im¬ 
portance of the initiative which 
Nick Faklo and his colleagues are 
taking in negotiating with local 
authorities for sites on which to 
build driving ranges and asso¬ 
ciated nine-hole courses. The 
expanding game needs such facil¬ 
ities. J hope the Sports Council 
will encourage the concept. 


Were I still a member of the 
House of Commons, I would pm a 
question down on the Order Piper 
to the Minister for Spent I would 
ask him whether iris attention had 
been drawn to the Royaf and 
Ancient Golf Club's spedafly- 
comrnisaosed survey The De¬ 
mand for Golf tmd tire oeedfor ?00 
sew golf courses; what further 
advice the Department of the 
Environment was giving to the 
planning authorities to encourage 
the a t t ainm ent of this target; an 4 
whether he would make a 
statement? 

There would be a kick is my 
supplementary* 

“While acknowledging, * Mr 
Speaker, the Government’s efforts 
to see suitable land freed for 
golfing development, would not 
my Hon Friend agree that much 
more will have to be done if the 
25,000 boy and girls, whom the 
Golf Foundation wifi be bringing 
into the game each year between . 
now and the end of the century, 
are to find places to play at prices 
which they can afford? 

- “And would be not further agree 
that, far from impairing the 
principle of conservation, imagi¬ 
natively-constructed golf courses 
can actually enhance the 
environment?" 

P.B. "Laddie" Lucas, a wing 
commander in the RAF during the 
Second World War and a Conser¬ 
vative AfPfrom 1950 to 1959. is a 
former boys’ golf champion, 
Walker Cup captain, and member 
of the Sports CoundL ■ 


ROWING 

Cracknell’s 
early rate 
is decisive 
at finish 

From Mike Rosewell, 

ROWING CORRESPONDENT. 

AIGUEBELETTE, FRANCE 

JUBILATION was apparent 
among British supporters at the 
World junior championships 
after yesterday's semi-finals 
when the British men's team 
ended the day with all but one of 
their sweep-oared crews in to¬ 
day's finals. 

With the eight and the coxed 
pair safely through on Thurs¬ 
day. it was the turn of the 
coxless four, the coxed four, and 
the coxless pair to progress to 
the final six and both the fours 
succeeded. 

A final place was expected for 
the coxless four, the leading 
British boat with the 1989 gold 
medal winner, Gregory Searle, 
on board, but the manner of 
their win was again majestic. 

James Cracknell. the stroke, 
maintained a rate of 39 for well 
over a minute and 500 metres 
was covered in a remarkable 
1 mm 26-06sec in still con¬ 
ditions. At the half distance the 
British were five seconds clear 
of the chasing pack, unusual at 
this level of competition. The 
British then relaxed, dropping 
the rate to 30 as they ap¬ 
proached the finish. 

An hour later the coach. Paul 
Wright, was already working out 
today’s plan, clearly worried by 
Romania who were again row¬ 
ing within themselves in the 
other semi-final. His crew's 
approach will be one of 
“containment” with extra effort 
at chosen race points. 

The coxed lour stroked by 
Simon Rey. of Hampton, pro¬ 
duced a very different race 
approach. Selected as the No. 4 
boat after trials, the crew was 
regarded as passible finalists but 
gave hopes of a medal placing 
yesterday. 

Lying fifth after 500 meters, 
they overtook Poland io contest 
the lead with Romania. West 
Germany and Yugoslavia in the 
closing stages of the best race of 
the day. snatching the third 
place by feet from the Yugosla vs 
who had two exhausted crew 
members removed to a safety 
boat 

Honour in defeat came for the 
coxless pair of Austin Ambrose 
and John Wamock who have 
rowed together for three years 
with City of Cambridge. Chosen 
as the “spare men" for the team 
on the understanding that they 
would substitute for any other 
crews with problems, the duo 
came within a whisker of reach¬ 
ing the finals themselves. 

As underdogs, their plan was 
to give everything in the first 
half and, at 1,500 metres, they 
were just holding third place 
from Bulgaria. The closing 
stages proved too much and 
with tiredness causing erratic 
steering, they virtually stopped 
in the last few strokes as the 
Bulgarians slipped pasL. 

Bruce Grainger, the inter¬ 
national performance director, 
stated earlier this season his 
intention to achieve a junior 
sculling world medal within five 
years. The performances of the 
quad and double in Frants 
might give hope for success 
before 1994. 

RESULTS: OuaMwre: Men's Coxed 
Powk Rrst smnMinst 1, Italy 0:30.06:2, 
Franca &30.4fc 3 , Czechoslovakia 
63i ir. Second Mnt*-flnafc 1. Romania 
&2S.67: 2 . West Oewy 626.14; 3. 
Bmah 626.66. Matfadoutto acute FM 
jwmytaefc 1. Italy *3055; 2. France 
6 : 46 . 04 ; 3. Soviet l/nton 6:47.04; 4, Britain 
6£4.60. Second semMtefc 1. East 
Gemeny. 2 . west Gwroany, 3, Norway, 
no tones tafcsaMwra emtoae pairs: Hrat 
aatm-Arat 1 . Wy ttSi.05:2. Sovfflt Unton 
6 &T2; 3. Bufcvfa 659.32: 4, Britain 
703.66. Second jemt ft net 1, YuCOGttvK 
6-63.98; 2, East Germany 6:5719: 3. West 
Germany 7.-KL06. Man's coatee toun: 
Fin# semifinal; 1 . East Genmny Bnftiz: 

2. Czeenostovatoa 620.42: 3, Romania 
6-21.26. Second aemMlnafc 1 . Britain 
G:l5.8t: 2, Uruguay 647.89-. 3. Auttata 
6:1340. Hn'iquBd acute Rrst aomi- 
ftte 1. Es« Germany 5*7X5; 2. ClfictKJ- 
Stovokia 6:03.85.3, Sown Union 6-OA55; 

5. Groat Britain 6:0624. Second semf- 
2"* 1. Italy 6:1.73: 2 . Poland 6A57; 3. 
Germany &06.45. 

2* Unai Bntan men’s want, men's 
““SJiaair and womens costow totr Had 
“wcywaSftad. 


The leading lady of Woburn is a golfer modelled (and remodelled) on Faldo and with a power about to flower 

A swinging day at the office selectors satisfi^ 

— ? — —— -with the final left 

by vanishing seeds 


By Mitchell Platts 

GOLF CORRESPONDENT 

KJTRINA Douglas yesterday 
edged towards her ambition io 
win the Weetabix British 
Women's Open when she 
scored a 71 in (he second 
round on the Duke's course at 
Wobum Golf and Country 
Club. 

Douglas has a halfway ag¬ 
gregate of 140. six under par, 
although as far as her aspira¬ 
tions are concerned it is her 
dedicated and blinkered ap¬ 
proach to the game that 
suggests she can fulfil her 
objective. 

In many respects Douglas 
can be compared to Nick 
Faldo. She came to the game 
at the relatively late age of 17 
and she immediately accepted 
(hat there could be no sub¬ 
stitute for hard work. 

Douglas possessed an in¬ 
nate talent, as detected by the 
former Walker Cup player, 
Gordon Cosh, who. on seeing 
her strike her first shoL recom¬ 
mended that she should con¬ 
sider a career in the game. 

So Douglas, supported by 
her father, took one year off 
from school, during which 
time the ten-hour session on 
the practice range became 
commonplace. Her disci¬ 
plined approach enabled her 
to ignore other distractions 
and concentrate on improving 
her game. 

That endeavour was re¬ 
warded in 1982 when she 
became the British amateur 
champion, since when Doug¬ 
las has maintained her alle¬ 
giance to the practice range. 
Even now she is consistently 
the last player to leave the golf 
club. 

“I don’t know Nick Faldo 
but I would like to think we 
are very similar in the way we 
approach the game.” Douglas 
said. “1 treat golf as a pro¬ 
fession. It's like going to the 
office. I take my lunch breaks, 
then I return to work. If that 
means working until dusk, 
then I accept it This is not the 
best I'm going to be." 

In similar feshion to Faldo, 
she has worked on a swing 
change over the last two years. 
Her David Leadbetter is lan 
Waus. from her home town of 
Bristol, and. like Faldo. Doug¬ 
las has had to accept low 
moments while going through 
the remodelling process. ‘‘The 
okl faults occasionally creep 
back in but generally the swing 
is getting better and better,” 
Douglas said. 

She went 29 holes in this 
tournament before making an 



THE En gH<h amateur champ¬ 
ionship has produced the final 
at WoodhaH Spa today which 
the selectors might have nomi¬ 
nated, in secret of course, once 
all four seeds had vanished from 
the bottom half of the draw. 

Gary Evans, from Worthing, 
the one remaining seed and 
already joint holder of the 
English strokeplay champ¬ 
ionship, is pitted over 36 holes 
against Ian Garbutt, of Wheat- 
ley, last year's boys champion 
and captain. Evans, aged 21, 
beat Lee Yearn, of Ely City, 3 
and I in one semi-final, and 
Garbutt. aged only 18, beat 
Liam White, of WoUaton Park, 
3 and I in the other. 


Garbutt was in dazzling form 
either side of lunch. He won the 
last six holes of the morning 
against the luckless Mark Dove, 
from Broadway, five with bird¬ 
ies, and six of the first seven 
holes of the afternoon against 
poor White. Thereafter, White 
put up a show of resistance and 
broke his duck at the long 9th 
(560 yards), where he was near 
the green in two for a winning 
birdie. Garbutt won the 10th to 
go six up again, but surrendered 
the next two boles, driving in to 
the forest at the 11 th and taking 
three putts at the next from a 
long way down the green. 


By John Hennessy 

White took three putts in turn 
at the 13th to leave Gartmttfive 
up with five to play. He could 
get only one back before the 
door dosed on him at the 15th. 

The left-banded Yearn de¬ 
fended sturdily against Evans 
and, although he was never 
ahead, nor was he ever more 
than one hob down irittU the 
16th. 

Over-compensating for a ten¬ 
dency to hook in the rooming, 
he pushed his tee-shots and at 
the 3rd, a difficult little pitch 
from die rough over a bunker 
defied his attempt to get up and 
down. He made good dial lapse 
with a pitching wedge to three 
feet fix- a birdie at the 4th. 

Thereafter, they slugged it out 
through the sweltering after¬ 
noon, Evans twice, more 
establishing and losing the lead 
before going away from his 
opponent at the 15th. 

Yearn hit loose shots, with 
short irons, loo, to the LSihand 
16th greens and, although he 
struck a good second in. to the 
17th. the ball unluckfiy.ran.on - 
into a bunker. 


jjWTjfcfliwjtete.L Yeem^Bj 


CUylbiO Thomson (Sane 
Ewta p" “ J • “ “■* 

HeethLS__ 

A Dunkt (Three 


Wtortew^ SetlS'ftmrtey 
.3 ant 2; L White (WoViton Park) bt 


„ Whits (Wotaton Park) L. 
— -RfveraL 1 Me;«Gertx* 

GBrtX*«WWH,'4te1d3L 


and i: 






Bunker hot-shot*. Marie-Laure de LorenzL of France, explodes from the sand before posing a threat with a 70 
error by taking three putts at concerned only by survival 


Thomson in final 
at first attempt 

By a Special Correspondent 


the 12ih. although she was 
more disappointed with the 
six she marked on her card ai 
the 17th. where her drive 
finished in the trees. 

Thai reduced her lead to 
one over Helen Alfredsson. of 
Sweden, whose best perfor¬ 
mance as a professional was to 
have reached ihe semi-finals 
or the matchplay champ¬ 
ionship. Alfredssson might 
h3ve overtaken Douglas if she 
had not followed a run of three 
successive birdies wiih a seven 
at the 14th. where she was in 
ihe trees and a bunker. She 
finished with a "1. 

Mane-La ure de Lorenzi, of 
France, is an obvious threat 
after a 70 for M2, but Muffin 
Spencer Devlin found herself 


alter starting with a nine 
caused by two out-of-bounds 
drives. She dropped a shot at 
each of the next three holes, 
and two at the short sixth, but 
finished with a 81 for 152, 
with which she avoided the 
guillotine. 

LEADING SCORES: 14(fa K Douglas. 69. 
71.141: H * Urea $5 son (Sws). 70/7t.142 
Li Wen-bn (Taiwan). 73. 6 S; M-L de 
Lorensi (Fr). 12. 70. 143: D Lofland (US). 
73.70. M SlashweWer iys». 73. 70.144: P 
Smn (US). 70. 74 145: C Pamon. 74.71; D 
Samara. 76.70: T jonnson. 71.74.146: 0 
Reto 76 70. T LucMwrst(US). 74. 72.147: 
M Esnir [US). 77. 70; M Burton. 72. 75; S 
Sfiapcon. 72. 75. - She (Won. 73. 74. T 
Famando (Sn Lanha). 74 . 73 L Maria 
(SA». 71. 76. G S»*an. 74 . 73. 149: L 
Mills (US). 74 . 75. J Money'. 74 . 75. A 
Oi&cs (P?ru>. 76.7j. j Comedian. 74.75. 
*50 5 Morgan'. 75. 75: J Lawience. 73. 
ii.l, Dvtfy. 1 6 . 74 , M Sugvnoro Japan). 
75.74. S Sffitowd*. 79.7 V A fecftolaa. 75. 
75. 

•denotes amateur. 


Hot pace Rafferty 
keeps well in front 

From a Special Correspondent in malmO 


Place for Bairstow 

DAVID Bairstow, the wicket¬ 
keeper. aged 38, who cannot 
find a place in Yorkshire's first 
or second cnckei elevens in his 
testimonial year, has agreed to 
captain the Yorkshire Exiles in 
their one-day match against the 
county at the Scarborough Festi¬ 
val on September 6. 

O'Sullivan signed 

WARRINGTON have signed 
the Australian rugbv league half 
back, Chris O’Sullivan, aged 30, 
from Canberra Raiders. O'Sul¬ 
livan, who had a spell with 
Oldham two seasons ago. has 
signed a one-year contract with 
the Wilders pool dub. 


&£££ Nelson title bout 

fta.Wee* TUB an,;,K _■ 


THE British cruiserweight box¬ 
ing champion. Johnny Nelson, 
is to meet Taouflk Bdbouli, or 
France, by September 5 for the 
vacant European title after it 
was relinquished by Anadei 
Wamba. 

Prize city 

Birmingham has won the Euro, 
pean City of Sport for Ail title. 


What can the matter 
be with Ballesteros? 

From Patricia Davies in Memphis 


PEOPLE are beginning to ask 
what is wrong with Severiano 
Ballesteros, once pie world's 
most exciting and successful 
golfer, who was yesterday strug¬ 
gling to make the cut'in the 
Federal Express St Jude Classic 
at the Tournament Players’ 
Club at Soulhwind. near 
Memphis. 

After the 9th. he was three 
over par and a long way behind 
Larry Silueira. the unexpected 
leader. SiNeira. a young Califor¬ 
nian who lives in Arizona, had a 
course record 62. nine under 
par. on Thursday, and had 
moved to 11-under after nine 
holes yesterday. 

Having won only once this 
season. long ago and faraway, in 
Majorca, and missed the cut in 
the Open at St Andrews, 
Ballesteros lacks the sparkle of 
old. Here, certainly, he has been 
worse than ordinary on the 
greens, missing si.\-fooi birdie 
chances be would once have 


regarded as gimmes. In the 
second round, having made life 
difficult with a first-round 74 , 
three over par, he nearly holed a 
seven-iron for an eagle-two at 
the 1st. That piece ofinspiration 
was followed by three bogeys, 
and five over par had no chance 
of qualifying. By the turn, 
Ballesteros had recovered to 
three over par, but level par 
looked borderline, since 68 play¬ 
ers broke par on the first day and 
only 70 make the CUL 

LEAPING FUST-ROUND SC ORES : (US 
unless stated: 62 l Sttwe. 6 & B 
Gartner. R Wif. N Price f 2 m). C Seek. 
66 : □ Canipe. M Lye. L Roberts, M 
Brook*. T Bynnr. P Persons. *7: D 
Rummefls. R ten l Jonzan. B Estes. 
H Green. 6 fc J Edwards, W Andrade, c 
Pawn. P Tnogr. P Burke. S LaMoname. 
0 A Wetonng. J D BUM. B Eastwood, J 
Thorps. L fen Brock. B Fate, te O 
Ectebsrear. M Wteoe. T Smpson. F 
290ter. L Qoments. D Froa tSA). j 
Ua-isftey, C Strangs, J Cook. P Bteckmar, 
L Mize, M AOcock. G Bruckner, J Dor. C 
Coopar. 7a M Smith. J (Mteghar, W 
Henzofanan. B R Brovvn. R Twsy. i Baker. 
Finch (Aus). Other s cor e *; 74; S 
Batesons (SpL 


RONAN Rafferty created his 
own beat wave here yesterday 
when he reached the halfway 
stage of the PLM Open with a 
total of 131. 13 under par. 

His assault on the Bokskogens 
parkland course took 67 strokes 
and gave him a three-shot lead. 
Only Colin Montgomerie, in 
Florence, and Richard Boxall, in 
Monza, have this season re¬ 
turned lower totals for the first 
two rounds. 

Ove Sell berg, of Sweden, 
who has won m^jor tour¬ 
naments in Britain, Spain and 
Belgium, but not in his own 
country, could well become a 
national hero this weekend. 

The 30-year-old from Stock¬ 
holm who is another disciple of 
David Leadbetter, defeated Ian 

Woosnam to take the Belgian 
title in May. He compiled a 66 
in the 96* of a scorching 
afternoon when he also bad to 
contend with the expectations of 
his enthusiastic countrymen. 

Setibog threw down his chall¬ 
enge with five birdies in an 
outward 31 after starting at the 
tenth. Then he got within two 
shots of Rafferty birdies at the 
fourth and sixth. He lost a stroke 
by driving out of bounds on the 
next, which left him three 
behind, but three ahead of 
Frank Nobilo. of New Zealand, 
and Fredrik Lindgren, a local 
player. 

Rafferty's best work, as on the 
first day, was in the first six 
holes. He had birdies at four of 
them, sinking a trio of twelve- 
foot putts and pitching within 
two feet of the twelfth flag. 

Victory tomorrow would be a 
stimulating send-off for the 
J^shroan for his campaign at the 
US PGA championship at Shoal 
Creek next week. 


Wayne Stephens, of Jersey, 
will probably never play in the 
US. but he will always remem¬ 
ber his first major tournament, 
the 19&9 Open ax Troon, where 
he led the first round with a 66. 

Glory soon turned to disillu¬ 
sion when at the end of the 
season his management com¬ 
pany went bankrupt costing him 
around £20.000. Stephens had 
to sell his car and give thanks to 
his parents for settling the rest of 
bis liabilities. A knee operation 
to repair a loose cartilage has 
been a recurring problem this 
season. 

Stephens shot SO in the first 
round here and considered 
withdrawing because of his 
painful left knee. But with his 
fust shot of his second round, 

using a seven-iron, he he holed 
in one at the tenth. The stroke 
won him a £ 14,000 Volvo car. it 
«fas the 23rd hole in one on this 
simmering European season. - 

SECCTW ROWO LEADERS (GS Hid ho 


MIKE Thomson, aged 35, who 
is playing in the event for the 
first time, will meet the inter- 
oationaL Craig Everett, in the 
36-hole final of the J & B Scot¬ 
tish Amateur Championship at 

Guliane today. 

For Thomson, the final will 
be the first of a memorable 
sporting double. He plays 
sweeper for the East of Scotland 
football side. Gala Fairydean, 
who are due to meet Rangers in 
a friendly next week. 

“1 think the prospect of 
playing against Mo Johnston 
and Mark Hateley will be the 
more nerve wracking of the 
two.” Thomson, who owns a 
sports shop in Melrose, said 
after beating Paul Blaikie, a 
Scottish-born South African, 2 
and I in the rain-soaked semi¬ 
finals. 

Thomson, the winner of the 
Borders championship last year, 
has only just got his handicap 
down to scratch. Indeed, he was 
balloted out of the Amateur 
championship at nearby 


Mutrfidd in June when he jvas 
playing off onei. 

He was never behind in his 
two matches yesterday, winning. 
three of the first four holes on 
the way to beating the Walker 
Cup player, Jim Milligan, 3and. 
2 and never looking hack after 
having won the opening hole 
against Blaikie. 

Everett, aged 22 . of 
Cambuslang, . staged * remark¬ 
able recovery to beat Andrew 
CoiMrt, his playing partner in 
the Scottish team, at the 20 th m 
the other semi-finaL He was 
four down , at the turn. Collar! 
having covered the outward 
nine in a fine 32, three-under- 
par, but birdied three of the last 
2? draw level, holing 

• from 25-feet at the last; before 
clinching victory with another 
hwdie at the second extra hole. 
gaULTfc OMj j" —lh M ThMwon 


gffiqhW MQ^Ftey 
(HRte hole. Semi-ante; ThonK 

wnfat Btede 2 and 1; Bwen M Conwt at 


A youthful finale for 
Welsh title decider 


SSWflBSftft 

J BczadSa JSp) 7M9: H 
ri. Rn5 * Tt 

RDrummond 00-71; V 


unless 
O 

(teej. 
Berandt r 
70, J van 

. -._ 71 

Cterk 


S'lfr 9 j ? 8 * 8 J HwmB hrsl 

«^!'S : i2r2WSi ft 0 ^ 


By Chris Smart 

ANDREW Jones, aged 19, and 
Andrew Barnett, 20. who both 
make uieir international debuts 
in the aununp, will contest the 
36-hole final of the Welsh 
amateur championship at 
Prestatyn today. 

Tournament officials 
warned a sigh of relief yes¬ 
terday as, after a- week of 
SUrpmes, two top players sur- 
v,ved .the heat to set up a 
potentialy close finale. P 
Barnett defeated John 
McLoughhn by three and two: 

wShiTS, a “ember ° f the 

Wrexham dub, got home two 
Calvert"* a8ainst Mi «*ae.l 
Barnett started brightly, win¬ 
ning the first twThote 


^* en t00k tiie 

16th after Cal vert foiled to make 

par. 

Haath) hi F m?c,S!|2 



Mm bt CteeTg g B * t a - 

•^5 crmou ’ a** 1 I** from 
the Welsh giris’ 
championship for tire Sini 

^** p *te*wood 
and Buckley yesterday with a 
convincing 6 and 4 victory over 

SSI!! SutmL I? ’ Din; * 


^8BBe Sg8B g 


looked jjsr izsrzrz s&sPBBBas s 

down io Calvert after four hofes. 

^ won the fifth and 
























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V-]i 

iCi 


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i final 


- ’-’***.-,* ■ ;• 






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la* •>£; 






* *> 

'-v* 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 



SPORT 25 



By Ivo Tennant 

05na/ day of 
fote*}-' Surrey drew wiih/hi 


to take 



AUSTAJR GRANT 
SWKsa 


351 in a 
overs, the 


LEFT io scare 
pmimum of 65 ^ 

“Kuans soon reasoned that 

too much was bring asked of 

ihcn*. In that they were with¬ 
out thar captain, Azhamddm, 
and Kapil Dev, to name but 
two match-winners, they were 
probably right Yet this did 
not excuse their timidity, nor 
prevent sporadic bums of 
stow hand-dapping ^ be¬ 
fore the end. 

They began competently 
enough. Raman and Mongia 
put on 94 in 23 overs, sum¬ 
marily dealing whh Gray. 
Once the partnership was 
broken, it was a different 
matter. In choosing not to 
send in Vengsarkar, the In¬ 
dians made their intentions 
quite evident 

Surrey had continued their 
second innings until lunch. 
Gin ton hit 74, although Stew¬ 
art, to the second ball of the 
day. Ward, through turning a 
flighted leg break into a 
yorker, and Lynch, aiming io 
square cut, all floundered in 
the pursuit of quick runs. It 
was Greig, striking the spin¬ 
ners in his clean, upright 
fashion, who played the one 
exhilarating innings of the 
day. There were five sixes in 
his unbeaten 76, struck with 
abandon in an are between 
mid-wicket ami long-off from 
6S balls. 

He asked the Indians to 
score at nearly six an over and, 
for so long as Gray was on, 
they did exactly that His first 
six overs went for 36. If 
Raman is not a regular mem¬ 
ber of the Indians* Test side on 
account of a weakness in 
playing the away swinger, 
which means he is m cele¬ 
brated company, there is no 
doubting his ability to drive 
on the up and to square cut 

From one Feitham over be 
look two dassy fours, each 
time flourishing his bat as if 
berating those of the opinion 
that, for all his runs, he will 
not be in contention for a Test 
place next week. He made 58 
before pushing tentatively at 
Kendrick's left-arm spin and 
being caught at silly point The 
pitch remained, however, 
essentially one which pro¬ 
moted stroke play. 

Perhaps Manjrekar and 
More were aware of this when 



In fhfl flow: Greig, the Surrey captain, looks to poll In typically aggressive fashion during his unbeaten Innin gs 76 at the Oval yesterday 


they left the field at a great lick 
at the end, as if to pre-empt 
further slow handdapping 
from the members. The In¬ 
dians were 184 runs adrift of 
then-target. 

SURREY: First I 

Stewa rt 82] 


Extra spinner is now vital 


CSmon 97. JttMnrtaq 

G S CSnton e suto b Ehas^—74 

N F Sargaant c Raman b Hiram!_18 

TAJStBwarTtowbSttttsW_22 

D M warn b Hrwani . 28 


By Alan Lee. 

CRICKET CORRESPONDENT 


M A Lynch c Manjrekar b Htamni 
MA 


3 

76 


^ ,c Vengsarkar b Hirwani _ 5 
KTMedfycottnatout_ ;.■ 15- 

Extras (b 2 . R> 9 , 18 ) 3 }_14 


Total (fi wkts dec]_255 

*“■ *** 4- 

149.5-170.6-190 

BDWJNG: Shams 3-07-0. Wasson 4-0- 
19-0, Sftastri 27 65-862, Hirwrt 150- 
71-4, Kumbts 30-150, Ra|u 10-1-52-0 


INDIA: Fast Innings: 289 for 9 dac AW V 
Raman 127. D a Vwnsaricar 56} 

Second tnrteigs 

W V Raman cwibb Kendrick_58 

N Mongte c Fettftam b Kendrick „_41 

SVMvvafciirnotoiit_52 

KSMoostWt out ..12 

ExbasObl.nb^ 4 

Te 


RJ Shastri.D B Vengsartof 
l^^ne,AWN(i 


■ j Rwktt}1 67 
.S Storms 


__ _ Stanhs.N 

Wasson. VRaJu.cfid 


Hirwani, A Kumble,i 
not bat 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-94.2-111 
BOWLING; Gray B-O-41-0; Fettbam 40- 
26ft Macflycott 24-7-550; Kondrick 266- 
50-2. 

Umpires: AG TWbttebeadandPB Wight 


VICTORY at Lord’s, 
achieved by bowling out India 
twice while losing only eight 
wickets in the match them¬ 
selves, may be all the justifica¬ 
tion England’s selectors fed 
they need to retain the same 
balance, and die same players, 
when the ComhiU series re¬ 
sumes at Old Trafford next 
Thursday. 

Whether or not this is the 
right thing to do is another 
matter. 

Tampering with a winning 
combination will not come 
easily either to Graham 
Gooch or Micky Stewart bat 
the fact remains that the team 
they selected at Lord's does 
not give them their best 
chance of beating India again 
and is uninformative on some 


important issues for the win¬ 
ter business in Australia, for 
which the selectors are sifting 
through replies to their 43 
availability cards. 

If they persist with the 
selection of only four bowlers, 
England will rightly point out 
that they were sufficient for 
the job at Lord's. What this 
overlooks, however, is that 
there was no need for a sixth 
medalist batsman. John Mor¬ 
ris bad time to make four not 
out in the first innings and did 
not bat in the second. Jack 
Russell, whose Test average is 
33, did not get in at alL 

It will require either a rogue 
pitch or an epidemic of sui¬ 
cidal strokes for England's 
batting to be seriously embar¬ 
rassed by this modest Indian 
attack and if they are looking 
to win another game, rather 
than simply guard against 


losing, a fifth bowler simply 
must make sense. 


If this is agreed, Gooch’s 
instincts will almost certainly 
tend towards another seam 
bowler, presumably the much 
tried DeFreiias but, on the 
prevailing dry pitches and 
against adventurous right- 
handed stroke makers, it 
would be for more useful to 
include a left-arm spinner, 
turning the ball away from the 
baL 


Assuming the selectors fol¬ 
low the thinking thus for, their 
debate is then likely to con¬ 
cern Keith Medlycott and 
Philip Tufnell, both chirpy 
young Londoners still essen¬ 
tially at the spin bowler's 
learning stage but either one of 
them capable of influencing a 
match, as their volume of 
first-class wickets this season 


(106 between them already) 
would indicate. 

Morris, demonstrably, has 
done nothing to merit being 
abruptly ejected and should 
remain in the party, his 
credentials for Australia hav¬ 
ing already been diligently 
presented. But the only way he 
could play, with a fifth bowler 
included, is at the expense of 
either Smith or Lamb if the 
selectors should feel that these 
two are certainties to tour and 
Morris has a bit to prove. Test 
appearances these days being 
worth rather more than a cap, 
sweater and pocket money, 
however, neither man is likely 
to volunteer for a rest. 

Possible England 12: G 
Gooch, M Atherton, D 
Gower, A Lamb. R Smith, J 
Morris, R Russell. C Lewis, P 
Tufnell, E Hemmings, A 
Fraser, D Malcolm. 


Crowe brings down curtain 
on north-east success 


By Stephen Thorpe 


story 


Sussex clear way for Hanley 
to make first-class debut 


JESMOND (Rest of World won 
loss): Rest of World beat ah 
Engtnd XI by ten wickets 
AN undefeated century by Mar¬ 
tin Crowe enlivened the . final 
passages of the Callers-Pegasus 
festival as the Rest of the World 
XI beat an England XI by ten 
wickets. The festival may be no 
more but north-eastern cricket 
has gained hugely in substance 
and will now hopefully flourish 
and attract the first-class game. 

Graham Gooch was officially 
resting and on Test selection 
duty, but the esteem and affec¬ 
tion for this annual event was 
reflected in his record sixth 
appearance on the first day. 
Indeed, 119 of the world's 
leading players of recent years 
have taken part but there was 
nothing yesterday to match the 
glories of Graeme Pollock’s 
hundred here against commit¬ 
ted bowling in 1983. 

The oppressively hot weather, 
again a factor in a generally 
lethargic day's play, made for an 
unfortunate end. cricket-wise, to 
a decade of festival acclaim. The 
Caller brothers, Roy and Ian, 
presidents of Northumberland 
and Durham respectively, have 
achieved more than anyone in 
the promotion of cricket in the 
region and their energies will 
now be channelled into Dur¬ 
ham’s pursuit of county status. 

The England XI were re¬ 
quired to bat after their crushing 
opening-day victory but man¬ 
aged only a dismal 179 all out. 
Tbe rot sex in early. Stephenson 
lost his off stump to Benjamin 


and Morris was caught behind. 

Broad, though, continued his 
anxactive form of the previous 
evening, t rimmin g the seamen 
off his legs, and made 55 before 
charging Sleep in tbe leg spin¬ 
ner’s first over. Lamb, the 
captain, did not linger long 
either and England slumped to 
118 for four in 30 overs. 

Hussain staked a further 
claim for Test recognition here 
last year after Dexter had re¬ 
turned to London. Now, he was 
in early at No. 4, before the 
chairman's departure and had 
ample opportunity to remind 
tbe selectors of his pedigree. He 
did, briefly, but there was no 
lasting impression, particularly 
when Moody bowled him. 

Brian Marshall, the 
groundsman, enjoyed lavish 
praise for another agreeable 
pitch, full of Surrey loam, and 
Peter Seep, professional at 
Rishlon in the La n cas h ire 
League, also leaped the benefit 
and the - man-of-the-match 
award with four for 34 off 10 
overs. Grcenidge wrapped up 
the innings with two wickets in 
his first two balls, acclaiming 
them like a hundred. 

The World XI raced to the 
target in 25 overs. Cook was 
dropped immediately after tea, a 
bard, low chance to French's 
right off Stephenson, the cat¬ 
alyst. fortunately for a belated 
round of extravagant stroke- 

These games are renowned for 
their relaxed informality and the 
crowd,, sun-drunk and som¬ 


nolent, were finally roused as 
Cook (yO. not out) weighed into 
Stephenson, and Hemmings 
brought Crowe closer to a 
century with a .selection of 
friendly floaters. 


Then, for one mad moment, H 
seemed that Lamb intended to 
add to his Test (flayer victims 
(Prahhakar is tbe sole unfortu¬ 
nate) but instead granted 
Hussain the final ignominy of 
being clubbed twice into the 
cemetery. 


ENGLAND XI 

B C Broad t> Sleep- 

JPSttpbensonb' 


JE Morris cParoreP 
N Hussato D Moody 


55 

- 7 

- 5 


*AJ Lamb cDodonuUsb Stoop_20 

KJBamettb Moody-:-10 

IB NFraocfiC Moody bGreeoWgo _ 30 

EE Hammings cParamb Stoop_0 

NO Cowans D Steep . 1 

APtagtoscunnotout- 11 

P Mutton cBontamlnbaMnidgB— 0 

B4.B6.w4)- 


Extras JO 4.1 
Total | 


*81(502 owre) 
FALL OF WICKETS: 


14 

179 


__ . 1-26, 2-38.3-82, 4- 

118.5-128,6-137,7-138,8-148,9-179, ID- 
179 

BOWLING: Ben ja min 5-1-21-1: Bishop 4- 
0-7-0; Dodamalda 7-1-32-1; Stephenson 
6-2-17-0; Swap 10-0-34-4: Moody B-1-23- 
2; Crowe 6-0-28-0; Graattxdch 4-044; 
GrMridgeO-2-0-0-2. 

WORLD XI 

S J Cook not out. .—- 70 

MB Crowa notour . - . 106 

Extras (to 4, w 1)- - 5 


Total (no wkL 252 omra) . 181 

■C G Graendgs. T M Moody, M J 
Graatbatch. A 1 C Oodonakto, 1 A C 
Parcre. F D Stephenson. P R Stoop* W K 
M BanfainJa l R Btehop, did riot bat 
BOWLING: Cowane 5-1-22-0; Mutton 7- 
0-33-0; Hemmings 60-53-0; Iggiasdon 3- 
1-26-0; Barnett 2-0-10-0: Stephenson 
21-0: Hussain 03-0-124. 

Umpires: S Lavtoon and G McLean. 


2 - 0 - 


SUSSEX, badly hit by injuries 
of late, may give a first-class 
debut to Robin Hanley against 
Warwickshire at Eastbourne 
today. 

Sussex have rushed through a 
registration for Hanley, who 
plays for Eastbourne, in the 
Sussex League and has hit two 
centuries for tbe county’s sec¬ 
ond team this season. 

A recurring hamstring prob¬ 
lem forces Paul Parker, the 
captain, to miss tbe match and 
also out are lan Gould (sore 
ribs) and Neil Lenham and Ian 
Salisbury, both with finger 
injuries. 

Martin Speight returns after 
missing tbe last match against 
Essex with a bruised wrist and 
Andy Clarke, the leg spinner, 
and Alan Hansford, the seam 
bowler, are both included in a 
14-strong squad. Colin Wells 
leads the side in Parker’s 
absence. 

Neil Smith, the off spinner, is 
back in the Warwickshire squad 
for the first time in almost two 
months. Smith, last season's 
match winner in the NatWest 
Trophy final, lost his place 
because of a cracked finger in 
June. 

Warwickshire, third in the 
table, have a slight doubt about 
the fast bowler, Joey Benjamin, 
who has a neck injury. Former 
Northamptonshire bowler Gar¬ 
eth Smith is on stand by. 

The Australian batsman, 
Tom Moody, needs only 117 
runs to complete 1,000 for the 
county He has made five 
centuries in only ten innings so 
for. 


Chris Cowdrey, the Kent cap¬ 
tain, who has missed the last 
two county championship 
games with a broken toe. will 
have a late fitness test to decide 
whether he can play in the three- 
day match against Derbyshire at 
Chesterfield. 

Graham Gooch returns from 
his record-breaking deeds in the 
Lord's Test to lead Essex 
against Nottinghamshire at 
Southend. But the interest is 
bound to centre on the 
Soulhchurcb Park pitch follow¬ 
ing the drama and controversy 
of 12 months ago. 

Then the pitch used in tbe 
match against Yorkshire was 
reported and declared unfit for 
first-class cricket and Essex were 
subsequently stripped of 25 
points which were to cost them 
the county championship title. 

But Peter Edwards, the coun¬ 
ty’s secretary and general man¬ 
ager, remains cautiously 
optimistic there will be no 
serious problems during this 
year’s festival week, particularly 
as the county have taken over 
pitch preparations from South- 
end council staff. 

Derek Randall, the former 
England batsman, could be 
forced to miss the game. 
Randall has been troubled all 
season with a groin strain and 
had to leave the field yesterday 
afternoon during a Second XI 
game against Scotland at Trent 
Bridge^ 

Worcestershire, the county 
champions, who surrendered 
their last chance of honours this 
season when going out of the 
NatWest Trophy on Wednes¬ 


day, make two changes for the 
match against Leicestershire at 
Grace Road. 

The fast bowler, Steve 
McEwan, makes his first 
appearance in five weeks and 
either Paul Beni or Gordon 
Lord will replace Martin Wes¬ 
ton as Tim Curtis's opening 
partner. 

Opening bowler Adrian Jones 
returns to the Somerset side to 
play Surrey in the first match of 
the Weston-super-Mare cricket 
festival. Jones, who has been 
rested, replaces Jeremy HalletL 

Darren BicknelL the Surrey 
batsman, was having a blood 
test yesterdau to see if he is 
suffering a recurrence of glandu¬ 
lar fever. Both Pakistani 
pace man Waqar Younts and 
Martin Bicknell return to the 
side, as does Graham Thorpe. 

David Cape! is back on 
Northamptonshire's injury list 
and will miss the match against 
Hampshire at Bournemouth. 

The all-rounder, who has 
already been plagued by knee 
and back problems this season, 
twisted his right ankle during 
the penultimate over of North¬ 
amptonshire's NatWest Trophy 
win over Worcestershire on 
Wednesday. 

His place will be taken by 
Duncan Wild, who is retiring 
from first class cricket at the end 
of the season. 

The fast bowler. Winston 
Davis, is preferred to his fellow 
West Indian, Curtly Ambrose, 
although there oould be a late 
call-up for either John Hughes 
or Tony Penberthy if Davis's 
hamstring strain recurs. 


CYCLING 


A lot of hot work 
sees top two stay 
in the same place 


By Peter Bryan 


A COMBINATION of another 
hot day, with temperatures of 
37C registered ip the Lincoln¬ 
shire wolds, and the prospect of 
two hard days of racing this 
weekend, produced little in¬ 
spired riding in yesterday's 
fourth stage of the Kellogg’s 
Tour of Britain. 

Their effort effected no im¬ 
portant changes overall, with 
Michel Demies, of Belgium, still 
wearing yellow but sharing the 
same leading time with Robert 
Millar. 

Riders had a flat S9-mi!e 
route to cover from Sheffield to 
Hull but. after what has become 
the cusiomery opening shot 
from Koen Vekemans, of Bel¬ 
gium, who took his third daily 
Wincanlon sprint in succession, 
there was a minimum of im¬ 
mediate action or excitement! 

Before the race had been on 

the road for an hour, a truce 

appeared to have been struck 
which put riders in no danger of 
being left behind as they eased 
the speed to collect extra bottles 
of drink for their colleagues 
from the following team cars. 

Heeding requests made the 
previous day, officials thought¬ 
fully arranged to have hosepipes 
directed at riders along the way 
to help keep down their body 
temperatures in the faltering 
conditions. 

Dave Mann, who started the 
season without a sponsor buL 
received backing in time to take 
part, increased bis lead in the 
TV Times sprint competition, 
winning the first at IS miles to 
the delight of the crowd at 
Doncaster. He shot to the front 
again at Gainsborough to under¬ 
line his dominance. 

Melted tar was a hazard 
whenever the course transferred 
to minor roads and riders were 


seen to be choosing carefully the 
“line” they took. 


“All quiet at the front” was 
reported on the tour radio and it 
was three and a half hours after 
the start before a potentially 
good breakaway trio of Marco 
Diem, of Switzerland, Eddy 
Scurer. of The Netherlands, and 
Adrian Timmis, of Great 
Britain, began to build a lead. 
They went to 30 seconds during 
their freedom but were caught 
after eight miles. 

Almost immediately another 
attack started which carried 
dear two Danes, Soren Lilbolt 
and Jesper Skibby, friends off 
the bike but race rivals riding for 
different sponsors. The pair 


made their charge after 69 miles 
with no difficult terrain ahead 
and agreed to share the pace- 
setting. 

With one ten minutes down 
overall and the other a further 
■ 17 minutes behind, the “bosses" 
in the bunch did not call for a 
counter-attack, even though the 
duo were almost four minutes 
ahead. The inactivity tempted 
Rob Holden and Paul Curran to 
leap away in pursuit just before 
the Humber Bridge. 

They were allowed to keep 
half a minute ahead of the main 
pack, which delayed its final 
challenge until four miles from 
the end. There was bad luck for 
Holden and Curran when they 
were directed off the finishing 
circuit. Once back on course, 
they were swallowed up by the 
pack, which had made inroads 
into the Danes' advantage. 
Lilhoti and Skibby pul in a 
spirited sprint for the line, the 
former getting the verdict by 
half a length. 

Maurizio Fondriest, Italy’s 
former world road champion, 
led in the charge for third place, 
crossing the line l:3lsec after 
Lilholt's victory and ensuring 
that be retained bis third place 
overall. 

Before the stage started. 
Millar’s manager had made a 
formal protest that the Scot was 
not awarded first place the 
previous day when he and 
Demies covered an extra lap of 
the finishing cireuii in Sheffield 
because of an official's error. 
The protest was disallowed. 

Yesterday. Tony Doyle was 
fined 200 Swiss francs (£80) for 
taking on unauthorised food. 
FOURTH STAGE (StofBeU to Hufl. 89 
mites): 1 , S LJhdt (Den), Hstor. 3hr 45mln 
05 mc; 2. J Skibby (Don). TVM, Sams tune; 
3, M Fondriest (U). Del Tonga, at Irnin 
31 sec: 4. P Anderson (Aus). TVM; 5. M 
Walsham (GB). Ever Ready. 6 . A Fanes 
flQ. Sere; 7, F Bontempi (ft). Diana 
Cotoago; 8 . D Raynor (G 8 L Banana- 
Falcon; 9. L Jatanert (Fr), ToshBM. 10, C 
Moreda (SpL Ctes. all same time. Overate 
l.M Demies (BottWetomann, 183004:2, 

R MDar gsm, Z. same tene; 3, Fdnarieatet 
1:43; 4, F Eixane (Spl das. 139; 5, J 
Mufler (Swrtz), TVM: 6 , E Bambini (RL 
Diana; 7. G Rue (Fr). Castor an ac 8 . L 
Storra (Ven). SaBe, aB same tone: 9. M 
Gayant (Fr). Totfitoa. at 244; 1 0. M Amwo 
(Max), Z. at 3ML Teams 1 . Waimamn, 
5537:17; 2 . Z, 553931; 3. Toshiba. 
55:39^9 Potato: 1 . Fondriest, 50ptx 2 . P 
Anderson (Aus). 32; 3. Jatoben 31. TV 
Thnea Sprint: 1 ,0 Mann (GB). 35pts 2, F 
RoscioO fit). IS; 3, MMar 11 . Mowbitaa: 1 . 
Dinar. 43pts; 2. J Hotzman (Noth). 27; 3, 
Demies 20. 

TODAY'S FIFTH STAGE: Brk fl ng to n to 
N e wc as t to upon Tyne, 114 ndtes. Start. 
10.15am: Scarborough, 11.09, Pickering, 

11- 59; Rosedaie. 1251; w eato r da ta. 

12 - 51; Mddtosbrough. 1331; Cnndato. 
14-27; Durham, 14J& finish, 15.12. 


Paulding heads 
record breakers 


By a Special Correspondent 


THE amateur kilometre cham¬ 
pion, Steve Paulding’s time of 
10.774sec for 200 metres broke 
tbe British record at the 
Leicester velodrome yesterday. 
This was in the qualifying time- 
trial round of tbe British grand 
prix to lead the 12 -man inter¬ 
national field. The professional 
sprint champion, Paul McHugh, 
in lO.SShsec broke Eddie 
Alexander’s record of 10.976, 
but Alexander could manage 
only sixth. 

The world professional pur¬ 
suit champion, Colin Sturgess, 
broke the national five 
kilometre record with 5m in 
59.20 1 sec. more than 20 sec¬ 
onds lan Hallam’s time in 1979. 

Pavel Buran (Czecho¬ 
slovakia). who was second in the 
world championship, qualified 
third fastest in l0.875sec and 
went on to win his next round 
heat from Simon Kersien 
(Australia) and Peter Jacques 
(VC Bradford). 

McHugh, Paulding, and Stew¬ 
art Brydon. the amateur sprint 
champion, also won their beats 
en route to the finals in the 
Raleigh Gala meeting today. 


■which is the finale of 10 days of 
racing. 

The week has included 23 
championships with the latest 
being the juvenile 500-metre 
time-trial. Once again Richard 
Wright (VC Lincoln) showed bis 
all round talent to van in 
36.l26sec and add the title to 
the gold medals he won pre¬ 
viously in the pursuit and sprint 
events. 

It was dose, however, with 
Richard Gibbens (Aneriey BC) 
only 0.002sec slower. The 
bronze medal went to Matthew 
Middleton (Kirkby RC) with a 
time of 37.428sec. 

In tire 4,000-metre team pur¬ 
suit the Team Haverhill quali¬ 
fied fastest in 4min 36.97sec and 
the dub appears to be the heir to 
tbe Manchester Wheelers dub 
which is not defending the title 
It has held for nine years. The 
Olympia Sport quanet, from 
Essex, was second fastest in 
4min 3938sec. 

Sally Dawes (Leicester RC), 
still a junior, was fastest in the 
women's three kilometre pur¬ 
suit at the quarter-final stage 
with a time of 4min 6.767sec. 


YACHTING 


Japan joint favourites 


AUSTRALIA and Japan are 
favourites for the Kenwood 
Cup, which begins with a 27- 
nauiical-mile offshore triangle 
off Waikiki today (Bob Ross 
writes). Tbe Kenwood Cup. a 
regatta held every second year 
for offshore yachts on the 
Champagne Mumm World Cup 
circuit, has a fleet of 45 . 

Australia, which won the 


Kenwood Cup in I98S and 
holds the World Cup. has a 
strong team ofbig yachts — Alan 
Bond's Fedrick-designed maxi. 
Drumbeat, the Farr 50, Heaven 
Can Wait (Warren Johns) and 
the Frers SO. Cyclone (Max 
Ryan). Japan Blue, which has 19 
yachts in the regatta, is strong 
with two boats fresh from the 
US 50-footer drcuil. 


c 


FOR THE RECORD 


3 


GOLF 


GOODWILL GAMES 


TENNIS 


YACHTING 


CYCLING 


PftESTATYH: Watoh n«rti 

iOMMB ThM iwmet M W Caftwi (CQPt 

BcsitansRws: 

{SummtoWrSMd 3; M 0 Hotfics (Ruttwj 
RirfgtaiBi P K BtoamWd I W iWwcW. 3 
■poIjt MwfrtcwantAfilaumte tog km h 
P ert (Naatfi). 4 andl R JonwonJCwjlljoi D 
I Stmtson iA*£w"* , «3-3 
PtodteMOOri and Buckley) ot A wesson 
(Trariegai Part). Z»fl 1 . 


BASKETBALL: Woro y to wafHicbta: fltaep 

fc CMdws!ow*a79. Canada. 76. Bra zjjB 

Btigm 79. Gnwp ft United 6mes 103. 
Ausnafca 80; Sown Union 70._Soutti Korea 77. 


Smi-Bnate: Unaad SWM » Bulgaria. 

Sonet Union. Cnchoflovatoa v Australia. 
Soon Korea w Canada. 

BOXMG: SuMtaai: UgM -eyaraip te Anatoli 

tnw a-JWB TEa 

0 Jones (HOtfWrtfl. 2 f; m kwb Konstantin Tnyu (USSR) MjarroMtew 
(WMctanbinN Baldwin {Uamnsant and - -- . 


HTZBUhEL: Austrian Open: TMnl idhkC H 

6-3. 6G: K NwaCBk (Cz) DtAAMOfNStn 


MOUNTS BAY, Cornwall Firefly National 
Chontoonetitas: Oven* Pog» (J fcfte. L 
Ryan. Castaways Out). London) Beit placed 
: Alarm (D and N Derby. Castaways). 


1 (Cz), S3,6-1. 
MONTREAL: Players Ct 


Steer Heel Tropby: Sanwaad (K White. N 
Jackson. FMxsrowaL Hatse Vonic no 
14«(EIWMwr. A cSnpon, Budarorth F C 
Setting Cfcbi 


N Jones 



: Third iamb S Oral(W&taLMdS 

t^WSSSS^IiSSS^ 

60. frft N zverewjussfl)« Jo Daw (Ga, 

64, 6 * N TtoHiai (Fr) bi P Hy (Out 6 - 1 . 6 ft 
NSawamatsu (Jspwfl W BPautos(«istna), 6 
2.1-8.63: J CapnaaruS) blC BanJamtniUS). 
8-3. 6 -fc M MM (Stab) bt H Ketasl (Can). 
6-3.2-6.S-8. 


. : Race She abandoned due to 
lack oi wind. Ovarate 1 , p Towers and N 
OnQfl. &7SP®: 2. C Rdbraon and J 
. Ironmonger. 9 jpts; 3. C Hawth and S 
Aston, tfrepifc 4. r nmei and M Parting. 
13.7Spts:5. M Holt and CManott24pfs; B.H 
Lord and DCtasnotm.25pts. 


LEICESTER: BCF National track e bawptoff 
ships: Mac Professional apnne Rnafc Mc- 
Hugn bt Gary Cottman. 2-0. Third place nde- 
otl: Wood bt Gian Cottman. 2-t. Amateur 
tandem sprint semt-itnalK P Boyd (Clayton 
Veto) and G Hebert (Team Sponrf Tanwndei 
bt M Borman (VC N omn nt Bm ) and B Fudge 
(Portsmouth CQ. 2-1. CPyatt («y o! Stoke) 
and MPfiSps (Wotwrnampton RCC) tn B 
Akaandat t«y ot BWjurghi and C Ranwrte 
(Team Zoyiand) 24. Amateur 50km points 
race: 1. S Lfltsrone (Team Havertiii), SS. 2 .5 


IMkotvb (Team HawrtM). 36: 3. J Snortn 
(VCrvaifegmiin). 2/ JsvenMo 2,000 


post* limb R VWngnt (VC LJncoinl. 2mm 
g.BBDaec Dt M Mddflon (Kirtfiy CCL 
231372- 3. R Broca (Wembley RC) 235.332. 


POOLE BAY: Mafin Rocket HrtTima(i. rwtn 


MifjHJ i note. Bsffifltt bi O CarrOfl 


ICE hockey: CttCMHtovrtda 8, Serttzatand 

4: Fintoad 3. West Germany 1._ 

DIVWG: Women's 1m nnaabond: Geo Mn 


IDS ANGELES; ATP 

(US) MT *mm 


fonm). 50880. Z 

RfflKE SKATj 


_SKATMG: .. . . 

KuncNB and S Ponomarenko 


*a**5SSBsSE 

Demwtt W M ^ 

Srtto-finale: Stroud bt Jonas, at 1991. Oermot 

bt Morgan, an 21 st. 

STAMBERG, MUMCH: jtadt Ombbo Tip- 

SBEtassaraaBag 

H GMrta (IMG). J S Hnrtey. 



68,63; JTanngo(US)WDP»e(l 
7.64; G MuBSf(SA)brJ Rto (US), 


m 


4* 

. . 8 - 
63; 6 - 



Women's 1000m puraul (leadwQQualiiBfs 
1 . S Dawes (Lftcestererirt HO. 4m<rt 
5.120t»c; 2. M Jonnson (Dmmngmn RC), 
<1-12200: 3. J H*l (Liverpool Mercury RCL 
4.18341 .JannOa 500m tttae trial Ikiat 1 . F| 


bt Slum Mstsuoka 


3.431). Cyntam SC: 2, J 






Wngbt (VC UncattiL 36.12Gsac 2. R Grbtwns 
(AnrisyBC). 37.128.3. M Middleton (KirUry 


ATHLETICS 


WIIULEOONb Royal Airforce Tenab 
ChempiMHtii|W Hart atagtoa: CpI Hughes 

- -63,6-1:3- ' 


PLYMOUTH: NatWest Cadet Open Chm- 

--,8383, A 

,8381. F 


■ g AriuBMi andl 

_ y),fifi.M5aaeandPHowtoB 

lArtto«; 66 . 


(uskas. 

«g*M wwin oMOrSta_ 

SSEStetoTNmraces): l. SSarteftiw, 
W.2. A Cadre (Fr). TO) G Mygtowttj 
/Pnfl n0 Women: l.MCasasffinjU>2.P 
wSTiG^. IDA 3. Y Kazakova fUB&RI. t4.7„ 
YACHTING: Rea cto» WarJme mcateB 
LeOetter (US). 15.0. Metfa 470 dM(UK 
three racMl: TTynitoSkiKterwtoTTynWe, 
crew (USSH). > 1 A. WamanV 470 (after throe 
and Teiene 

PaJthofcnrt (USSR). 


•.S-4;qpll 

6 -Z. Han'sgtooDottoles: SAC Queen and JT 


FOOTBALL 


It Lena.48.7- 6.6 

caraOT^toWgComuwwsgtSJwrimora 
end CpI WhdflftMd. 36. 61 6 ft » u 

aswgas; 

Otamr UFBU RWay-PritCtort. 6*7-6; Pit 
OHMaBLeod Srwaw,36,64; 60;Cpl 
BaawndwMpfttPugn.BO.B^SmDochetiy 
bt Fo Off More 61.61 Wmvn dottoiBK 
Sot Docheny and SACW Oteer bt Fo on 
Branl and Set Montocav, 61. 6 B; ft Li 
Rofcypntctwa ano Cp< BeaaendarW SACW 
Brady snd ACW Burgess. 68 . 61; Rt OH 
Macuod and Cpi Browne bt P» OH Parfinage 
andQXvneian.6i.63. 


taraUp. Senior Ftert (race seven): 1 , 

Mte (waidnngfieid Sffitag CU^ 2. 

Rowset (Exe SCt 3. 8396. B E 
(Partetona Vachtdito). Racaeintit 1.8^383. 
MBs; 2.84(17. M J Grttoro; 3. K3& J Q&mcxxl 
Overate 1 , Lae .iFLpts 2, F Monefenans 


5-PI Watson«raGiino 0 andSgiLflne. 4 fl. 7 - 8,6 p-rlSiiMwmunnP 

me l, JTrenary ft(MEgBrtonanSF 8 UShaetorblSail* 

SnmandFS UW00d,64.2-6.6ftwScdr s^umJSS!! 

Btortaeeecmd Car^end V^CornUWWSmS»WTWxx»3 5- Si- YU*#"? 




. . . _ . 7637, j McEwan 

( Royal LyflXrigun Vaem Club). Race nght 
18377. SBarrortFmJFtanmm Pond SCT 2 . 
8334. Nmtut a 823s. o Barra (Tamests). 
Overate 1 . Nnttatt. SXptx: 2 . Hutdanson. 
9KptK3,7262, LTiddaneptotifl. 2&Vpc. 


CRYSTAL PALACE: Representative match: 
MOns T Davies (Comoned Services). 
ID.31 sec. 200m; D McKenzie (Southern 
Court**). 21-54- 400m: D Hall (SC). 49.07. 
nom: A UB(AatAK). Imn 5i.4s«c. 1 JOOms 
G Sehar (SCt 3:4982.3JU0ne P Freary (Crvtt 
SerweL 87-84 3J»0m steepteclwse: I 
Logan (SCI. ft24J)3. 110 m lutflem B Si 
Louh(Sa 1A54 400m teatfleKTPnca ICS). 
528. H«h Jump: M Huggkta (SCI. 205ffl. 
Pete Vatft P GMxma (Ni gueSi) 5m. Law 
_ . - 722m. Triote Jianp: D 


BASEBALL 


PROIDLY: Foertma a. Uvarpool te 


CRICKET 


GLIDING 


NATIONAL LEAGUE: New York Mats 5. 
Montreal Expos 1; Ftostugh Pirates 8 . 
Cncago Cute 5; San Dtego Padres 8 . 
cmcinnatt Reds 5; st Lous caramu 4, 
PMbtieUiu PhOes 3; Houston Astros 3. 
Aitene Brara i; Ssr RranaseoGbnts3. lob 
A ngeles Dodgeni- 


Junp-. D Cocks (SC), 7Z3m. 

Reeve (SCI. 15.10m Shoe R bawes (OS). 
1543m. Dtecus: P Edwards (CS). 50,74m. 
Hammer. G Cook (SO. 6294m. Javabn: C 
Mackenzie (SC) 7294m. 4»1# rrtay: 
Soutnam Coyn»s. -4239. 4 x 480 relay: 
Southern Counties. 3:10 79 Mat rti result 1 . 
Soutfwm courties. 250pts: Z. Combined 
Servtees 1545.3. WMlen 132 4. OvnSamca 
1216. 


SWIMMING 


RCPREBEOTATiVE MAtOfcErf wKE ngjrmd 
fomur W1866 55 o vers IMJ fifltwgg. 
Uoshaiao AWdi 4-42J. PaiaSton tteW-ite 
1867,533 overs- RMostao UpdBMBswon By 


SPEEDWAY 




19 LUtf 1 


Mrarti'_ 

T96-7.C*StiB Cary 1668. 


NATIONAL LEAGUE: (pswrih 48 (C Louie 15, 

^W£r,k s k«. a J 

MKttaeateougii M (R Hunter; 16 ° Swwite 
14), Mitton Koynaa 26 p Oarfce 


1.R 


«.M 


fe^0v£5rpeS£«( 

Webb (KanbuS 3QTL-3£81; S, .3 
Brivi(Nimbus^, 3336; 9, R Jora piirtM 3) 


AMERICAN LEAGUE: Baltimore Orttes 5. 
Kansas City Royals 1; Chicasp Sottt 4 . 

Mtoateae Brewers 3 (1st gama); Chicago 
White Sn 4. MflwaukM Sews 2 ( 2 nd 
<mma* DeaM T»re 6 , New York Yanhaes 5 
(MHisi. Texas naraers 5. Toronto Blue Jay9 
4 (ii mi; Seattle Marines 7. Mmoesem 
Tattna a OoUaaH MMata 7, — 1 
Angels 5. 


AUSTIN, Texas US Swimming Chmnpton; 
StapK Men’* 200 m butterfly: 1 . M Steward 
imtiS 7 . 43 i«c 2, B Pipoenger. i.SS.ift 3. B 


1 S7.4388C 2. 

Gum. 159.77. Man’s iOOm'badratmke; 1. J 
Rouse. 54-66: 2. 5 Johnson. 56.11; 3. J 
Trtto*. 5660. Men’s 50m beesMK 1 . T 
Jager. gJfr Z S Ciocfcor. 22^5; 3. A 
SdSwR. 22.78. Wwwi’a 200m tndMduai 
medlay: i, S Sanoera. 214.36-. 2. m e 
B tanctwnJ. £15.44;3, A Shaw. £l748Wara- 
ante MMm iMMQte 1. J Emw. mSE,-2, e 
Honoeft, 3. J Koto. 64288. 


FOOTBALL 


Villa seek Continental 
link through Venglos 


By Dennis Shaw 


ASTON Villa yesterday became 
pioneers of a more European 
approach by big English dubs 
when Jozef Venglos conducted 
his first coaching session as their 
manager. 

His arrival coincided with the 
publication of a balance sheet 
revealing a turnover of £5.6 
million, nearly half of which 
came from non-footbail ven¬ 
tures. But the former coach of 
the Czechoslovak World Cup 
side, who has succeeded Gra¬ 
ham Taylor, the new England 
manager, has arrived as a foot¬ 
ball man, pure and simple. 
Venglos. aged 53, introduced 
himself as “boss" to the players 
and "just plain Joe” to everyone 
else, taking his place in the 
dub’s business empire with 
responsibilities for playing af¬ 
fairs only. 

Doug Ellis, the club chairman, 
said: “We looked beyond the 
end of our noses in appointing 
him. There will be a freer 
passage of players to and from 
Europe after 1992. We are sure, 
with all his knowledge on the 
Continent, that this is the way.” 

Venglos drove his squad 
through a brisk and punishing 
session in 9(klegree tem¬ 
peratures. Afterwards, in good 
English, one of four languages 


he speaks welL be insisted he 
would have “no problems’” in 


getting to grips with the first 
division and the pressure it 
applies. 

“English dubs have always 
had a powerful, direct way of 
playing but recently in such as 
Barnes, Waddle, Gascoigne, 
Platt, Daley and others there are 
indications of players becoming 
more flexible and athletic,” he 
enthused. 

"I have not come to Villa 
Park to change its football but to 
fit in with a very professional 
and friendly atmosphere. If I 
can add something to that i will 
be very happy.” 

Venglos was to have watched 
Arsenal at Wolverhampton in a 
friendly Iasi night and will see as 
many mid-week games as he 
can. 

"1 spent some time with Bill 
Shanklv, Hany Catierick, Ron 
Greenwood and Terry Neill in 
1973." he revealed. "Also. I 
played against many British 
dubs forSlovan Bratislava and I 
managed the Czech national 
team for 76 internationals. To 
day I am very happy to have the 
first touch with the boys. They 
are very experienced and pro¬ 
fessional and many of them {flay 
for their national teams. Being 
with them is no different to 
other teams. I understand about 
pressure." 


( IN BRIEF ) 


Becker is 

beaten 


KJTZBUEHEL. Austria (AP) - 
Boris Becker, the top seed, was 
beaten in an hour by Karel 
Novacek, of Czechoslovakia. 6 - 
3,6-3 in the quarter-finals of tbe 
Austrian Open here yesterday. 

In another upset, Horatio de 
la Pena, the unseeded Argentine, 
defeated Sergi Bruguera, from 
Spain, the eighth seed, 6-4, 6-1 
on the clay court. 


Third place 


Barrie Edgington, of Britain, 
took third place in the second 
leg of the BlC 1.000 kilometre 
windsurfing race from Caletla to 
PaJamos in Spain. Luca Pacino 
of Italy won the leg and is the 
overall leader, with Edgington 
second. 


Sweet sponsor 


The Football League cham¬ 
pions, Liverpool, signed a one- 
year extension to their 
sponsorship by the Merseyside- 
based appliance manufacturers, 
Candy, yesterday. It covers the 
1991-92 season. 


PGA replies 


Pome Vedra, Florida (AP) — 
The US PGA Golf Tour, react¬ 
ing to threatened protests and 
withdrawal of sponsors, said it 
will not allow tournaments at 
clubs where membership even 
“raises a question’' of 
discrimination. 




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SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


American football game that asks for neither quarter nor quarterback 




an Art exhibition 


■ i j.t 4*»- 


.. „ t . x 


By Robert Kirley Eg-v, : ( 7._^/ ■ 

THE Los Angeles Raiders and fit* • : . ' /ife. 

the New Orleans Samis will '“vVr ' 

contest American Bowl ’90. gsjK-"' 'M&v''"’’ 

the fifth annual National p|L‘ .-S'. - . 

Football League exhibition, ai »£ . ■’ ‘ ^ l l 

Wembley tomorrow, but nei- v " 

ther club will have its ace 
quarterback. ; 

This is not a cause for 
consternation. Who starts at ' ’ 
quarterback does not make a £ " ■ :>• 
great deal of difference in the ? • .££■■ i .■ ^^jraSrofiT ■; 
American BowL The four r ■ 

previous games have featured ' ‘■’v 

most of the leading passers: 

McMahon, Evereu, Sway. 

Marino, Montana, Cunning¬ 
ham and Kosar. 

They were cheered heartily, 
only to be substituted quickly, 
usually in the second quarter. 

Never mind — toe game is 

competitive and the ai- t 

mosphere is thoroughly big 

time. Why get your key player J^aa 

banged up in the first pre- jaapM I 

season game, anyway? 

Steve Beuerlein, of Los 
Angeles, and Bobby Hebert, of 
New Orleans, did not make 
the trip to London because 
they are unhappy with their 
pay. Jay Schroeder will start 
for the Raiders and John 

Fourcade will lead the Saints. fS&s&kSBSw 

Both are good. Schroeder. 

formerly with the Washington 

Redskins, shared the job with 

Beuerlein last season and . 

Fourcade started three games. .; ' • 

Neither club advanced to the “. • ’ . x . ‘ 

play-offs. '• **:**).-y. ; 

“I have the ability to lead . . . ■ v. » 

this ball club,” Fourcade said j • \ ' 

before practice at Cry stal Pal- ' V • ' r*.' . 

ace this week. “We’re here to . 

play our hardest." V. 

Art Shell, toe LA coach, - jz — 

earned Hall of Fame recog- Living on borrowed time 
muon as a player for the 

Raiders. “This is a great you won, lost or tied. You get 
opportunity for us and we to get up and have a chance to 
must lake advantage of it," he do better. Most players last 
said. “The distractions could about three years, so Fra 
be a negative thing. It’s my job living on borrowed time." 
to make it a positive thing." The multi-purpose running 
Marcus Allen, the Los An- back. Dalton Hilliard, of the 
getes tunning tack, believes Saints, said: “I’m looking 
the Raiders will resuscitate forward to the season. We 
their glory daysk They won the have , 0 establish consistency. 
Super Bowl in 1977. 19SI and Last year we didn’t win games 


JULIAN HERBERT 


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...Vk'iv • '* ’ 


Living on borrowed time: Goiic, nine years beyond his expected span with the Raiders, practising in Hyde Park 

iSS No rest for European victors 


1984. shot 

"Having Art for the whole q ua ner. 
season will make a big dif- p . *' 
ference," Allen said. Shell „„ 1 


we should have in the fourth 


Playing in the same division 


looic ovcr ta'midSSon to ““ 4< ^ 

ivccnl^Supt^Bowjil'antTlhe 
S™ ' he-s a grS L “ R3n.s »ill no: 

motivator" make things easier for the guys 

,, from IhcEig Easy. 

Bob Gohc, a 12-vear vet- __ 

ARm nnv t-irklp with the AMERICAN BOWL RESULTS: 1SS6: ChL 
eran nose taCKiewim tne cago Bears t7. Dallas Ctwrtxws 6: 

Raiders, said: ^Tie com- LA Rams 28. Denver Broncos 27:1988: 
rvtitinn ic uihil i<'« ahnut M '3 rre DoJphins 27. San Francsco 4»?rs 

petition is wnat u s an aoouL 2U 198ft p^a^ph^ 17 0tn6 _ 
Each play you know whether ia.Td Braves is 


MANCHESTER Spartans hope 
to complete a momentous dou¬ 
ble when they play North aim 
Storm in the Coca-Cola Bowl at 
Crystal Palace today. Their 
main worry could be fatigue 
after their victorious trip to the 
Euro Bowl tournament. Their 
opponents will have benefited 
from two weeks’ test since their 
semi-final victory against 
Birmingham Bulls. 

Spartans are the dominant 
side in British as well as 
European football. They were 
unbeaten during the regular 
season, toe only blot on their 
record book being the forfeit to 
Glasgow Lions of their final 
game. 

Despite the ofF-the-field trou¬ 
bles resulting from this, last 
year’s champions have marched 


By Richard Wetherell 

through the play-offs. They 
overcame Leeds Cougars 45-56 
and Glasgow Lions 32-29. Spar¬ 
tans will rely on their quarter¬ 
back, Choates, and Bailey, the 
running back, for their offense, 
while Wooten and Bosomworfh 
should ensure a tight defense. 

They will be busy against a 
Storm offense heavily based on 
the running game. 

Scoring 90 points in their two 
play-off games. Storm contin¬ 
ued the form that made them 
the league's top scorers. To¬ 
wards the end of the season the 
defense tightened up, but they 
conceded 30 points against 
Leicester Panthers and 41 to 
Birmingham Bulls. 

The World League of Ameri¬ 
can Football (WLAF) an¬ 
nounced that toe London 


franchise will play their five 
borne games at Wembley Sta¬ 
dium. The WLAF is a trans¬ 
continental league, starting in 
March, with the filial on June 9. 

There will be 12 teams in the 
league, right in North America 
and four in Europe: The Euro¬ 
pean teams are London, Barce¬ 
lona, Ftankfutt and Milan. The 
North American cities are New 
York, Montreal, Mexico City, 
Sacramento, San Antonio, Or¬ 
lando and Birmingham. One 
other is to be announced soon. 

Details were also announced 
of “operation discovery”. This 
is an effort to sign world-class 
athletes who have not played 
American football before. They 
will be affiliated to the league 
and coached for the necessary 
skills. 


Crash course in a sport 
that is larger than life 

O ne week ago to- f - . . - actually more lite a huge, 

day, the words . LAURA ■ . vwy relaxed garden party. 

American Foot- .\- The payers stated auio- 

baU, conjured up • l&U&Uf&Jn graphs, posed for photo- 

nnlv meaning- I—-—^-- graphs, flirted with 


O ne week ago to¬ 
day, the words 
American Foot¬ 
ball, conjured up 
only meaning¬ 
less images of men sboutire 

out sequences of numbers 
like bingo callers on speed 
while lumbering around like 
packs of grounded as¬ 
tronauts. But the American 
Bowl (to be played tomor¬ 
row at Wembley between the 
LA Raiders and New Or¬ 
leans Saints) loomed before 
me and I determined to 
acquire learning. 

I cornered an erudite 
friend, a man of mud) 
sporting knowledge, at a 
party; and, seated at a table. 
melUfluousIy drunk, sur¬ 
rounded by impressed by¬ 
standers, we talked our way 
throu gh the ground rules of 
American Football, using 
knives to signify the 10 yard 
marks, bottle tops for players 
and a piece of pasta for a 
ball At 4 o’clock in the 
morning, toe conversation 
was still going on. “So that’s 
—what was that you just told 
me about? Oh; a flea flicker 
— yeah, right, got it". 

The next morning, a cer¬ 
tain amount of this 
conversation had Bed my 
brain. So. I got a book from 
the library which promised 
to explain all: its first sen¬ 
tence was: “The aim of 
American football is the 
same as any other game, that 
is to beat your opponents". 
So for, so comprehensible. 

The next sentence read: 
“Id the case of American 
football this is achieved by 
scoring more points than 
your opponents," (still with 
you, squire). “These are 
obtained by four methods 
(under NFL rules): 
Touchdown/point after 
touchdown (Pat)/field 
goal/safety." From there on, 
it immediately got much 
worse; 1 foil as though 1 was 
reading a legal document, or 
Hegelian philosophy. 

Obviously, it could not be 
as complicated as this 
“American Football Made 
Easy" type of book was 
making it seem; 1 know all 
the players went to univer¬ 
sity but surely only George 
Steiner could understand 
these rules and strategies — 
and. of course, he is really 
not laige enough to play. 1 
read toe final sentence of the 
book: “Players will also wear 
a gumshieid", then closed it 


for ever, fear and haired in 
my heart. 

The next day I was logo to 
Crystal Palace to see the 
Saints and the Raiders meet 
the press then go through 
their practice routine. Small 
English boys in American 
football kit, laconic photog¬ 
raphers and journalists 
straight out of “Hold the 
Front Page" milled around 
the pitch expectantly; then, 
one team at a time, trailing 
an air of casuak self-pos¬ 
sessed mystique, the players 
trotted out onto the pitot — 
an extraordinary number of 
them and an extraordinary 
assortment. 

Some of them were really 
small, which amazed me: 
although maybe they were 
just comparatively small, 
because some of them (nam¬ 
ing no numbers) were plan 
fei, while a lot of them were 
merely enormous, with arms 
like legs, legs like torsos and 
torsos like two torsos. 

S ome of them were 
impossibly hand¬ 
some high school/ 
college types, the 
kind that turn up at 
the begmning of American 
honor films as toe boy¬ 
friends of the so eery, sexy 
girls who get murdered in the 
early reds. A couple of them 
looked like Vikings. Some of 
them could have been mem¬ 
bers of extremely cool bands 
of stars of Spike Lee films, 
what with their shades, 
Grace Jones haircuts and 
agile, self-aware movements. 

The diversity was surpris¬ 
ing but what they all had in 
common was great charm 
and confidence, in that 
straightforward, unembar¬ 
rassed way that Americans 
have. Also — in keeping with 
toe theory posted last week, 
that one's nam e can actually 
determine what sport one 
will eventually play—a lot of 
them were sarisfymgly and 
appropriately tided: call a 
child Newt HarrelL Howie 
Long or Napoleon 
McCall urn, feed him on a 
cow per day and you will be 
provided for in your old age. 
American footballers earn a 
lot of money. 

The meet-tbe-press ses¬ 
sion at Crystal Mace was 


actually more like a huge, 
very relaxed garden pony. ■ 
The players signed auto¬ 
graphs* posed for photo¬ 
graphs, flirted with 
cheerleaders, occasionally 
got cornered by a purposeful 
journalist and his camera 
team; amiably answered the " 
tangential (to be charitable) 
questions of someone like 
myself— because, realizing 
that I could not ask anything 
technical, I had opted for foe 
personal-approach. 

w w what do yon do 

m m / io the eve* 

1/V niflgi?” I 

- - V v probed dctcr- 

▼ ▼ . • nxmedly* cer¬ 

tain of unearthing a regime 
ofi-say, sl conservative 12 
hours’ practice per day fol¬ 
lowed by a tneaiof raw steak 
■and alfufo sprouts washed 
down by a power protein 
drink fbUnvcd by a night of 
intense celibacy. - 

“Oh, we see toe sights, you 
know, Buckingham Palace, 
Westminster—do you know 
any good dubs?” 

"Are you allowed to 
drink?" “Oh yes." “Realty?" 
(squawk). “Oh yes. You 
know, you have to govern 
yourself with drink. It's all 
. self-discipline”. I was im¬ 
pressed by that; it seemed 
tembly un-English, 
somehow. 

The practice session, too, 
was a display of self-regula¬ 
tion. It appeared chaotic at 
first but then, like a.Cecil B 
de M33e crowd scene, pur¬ 
pose and organization were 
revealed. 

As the training session 
(which usually lasts about 
two hours) revved itself up. 
so the incomprehensible 
strategies detailed in the 
library book were given 
physical elucidation: the 
finer points passed me by 
but it was not bard to get a 
powerful sense of the game's 
base thrust. In some ways it 
is, of course, very similar to 
rugby and its physical!ty is at 
least as exciting. ■ 

As with rugby also, the 
cathartic rough-and-tumble 
on the pitch does not trans¬ 
late itself into crowd vi¬ 
olence;, in America — where 
they are just as passionate 
about their football as we are 

— going to watch a game is 
something that families do. 
No wonder the idea of soccer 
is proving so hard to sell 
overthere. . 


SPORTS POLITICS 


Ramsamy begins 
S Africa study 


JOHANNESBURG. (Reuter) - 
Sam Ramsamy. the anti-apart¬ 
heid campaigner, arrived in 
South Africa yesterday for talks 
with local organisations on toe 
country's possible return to 
Olympic competition after an 
absence of three decades. 

Ramsamy, the chairman of 
toe South African Non-Racial 
Olympic Committee, said on his 
arrival from London that toe 
aim of his 10-day visit was to 
monitor the degree of progress 
towards non-racial sport. 

“I have been commissioned 
by various African sport bodies 
to meet with South African 
national controlling bodies of 
sport and Listen to their views on 
South African sport and its 
future development” he said. 

“The end of apartheid is toe 
key to everything. Apartheid 
must go ... that is toe view of 
the whole world.” Ramsamy. a 
key figure in keeping South 
Africa out of world sport as a 
protest against toe segregation 
of races, said. 

Ramsamy. who has lived in 
exile since leaving South Africa 
18 years ago, said he would 
discuss the possibility of form¬ 
ing non-racial governing bodies 
for individual Olympic sports 
and for sport in general. 

Most South African sports are 
run by rival bodies, with a 
segregationist white federation 
seeking to end toe sports boycott 
and an anti-apartheid organis¬ 
ation in favour of keeping the 


ban until apartheid is 
dismantled. 

Ramsay will report to the 
Association of National Olym¬ 
pic Committees of Africa 
(ANOCA), which asked him to 
hold talks with all controlling 
bodies of sport in South Africa. 
His report will be a decisive 
factor in toe return of South 
Africa to international sport. 

The International Olympic 
Committee (IOC) believes toe 
South African problem must be 
solved by Africans and 
Ramsamy's visit arises from 
requests by South African sports 
officials to the IOC to review the 
situation. 

Commenting on speculation 
that South Africa could soon be 
readmitted to the Olympic fold 
and that Durban could host the 
Games in 2000. Ramsamy said: 
“I hope they are right, but all toe 
pillars of apartheid will have to 
go first and I hope that will be in 
the next couple of months. 1 
cannot talk of any city hosting 
the Olympics because South 
Africas is not part of the 
Olympic movement yet.” 

He said he and ANOCA 
believed toe sports boycott had 
been successful in isolating 
South Africa, but felt they had 
yet to achieve their main objec¬ 
tive, to force integration of the 
country’s sporting bodies. 
Asked when the boycott was 
likely finally to be lifted, 
Ramsamy said: “It’s up to South 
Africans themselves." 


Government says few 
pupils will drop PE 


By John Good3ddy 


THE Government has claimed ’ 
that "very small numbers" of 
pupils aged 14 to 16 will be able 
to drop physical education on 
the new national curriculum. 

The announcement on Tues¬ 
day by John MacGregor, toe 
education secretary, has worried 
leading figures in physical edu¬ 
cation. teaching and sport that 
toe curriculum would be 
unbalanced. 

Instead, MacGregor said on 
television that many youngsters 

would be doing more physical 
education in school than they 
have up to now under toe 
national curriculum. 

He sard on TV-AM on Thurs¬ 
day toat if the government goes 
ahead with the proposals, “very 
small numbers of pupils will 
actually be able to drop PE. The 
vast majority will have to do it." 

Those individuals that may 
be able to stop physical edu¬ 
cation will be taking up options 
like a second modern language. 
Latin, Greek or economics. 

MacGregor was debating toe 
issue with Len Almond, the 
director of physical education at 
Loughborough University, who 
told The Times yesterday: “The 
government does have an in¬ 
terest in sport and exercise but 
there has been a genuine con¬ 
cent toat there was too much on 
the programme. 


“The government clarified 
the situation and has acknowl¬ 
edged the problem teachers are 
facing." 

Almond, who is also the 
director of the health and phys¬ 
ical education project at 
Loughborough, said that 
MacGregor’s statement _ was 
very positive for toe national 
working group on PE in schools, 
which was announced last 
month, and guidelines for toe 
subject. He said it was “good 
news for toe health of toe natioa 
and good news for sport". 

Howe ver, thousands of phys¬ 
ical education teachers, parents 
and sports administrators will 
still be concerned that under toe 
pressure of other subjects, it will 
play a less prominent role in 
many state schools than it did 
previously. 

Many leading figures paint 
out that toe subject helps to 
make children well-rounded in¬ 
dividuals and also widens (he 
options of school leavers. 

Professor Margaret Talbot, 
the Carnegie Professor at Leeds 
Polytechnic and a member of 
the government’s working 
group, has pointed out that by 
eliminating the one subject that 
js not primarily intellectual, the 
curriculum would not be well 

balanced. 


GOODWILL GAMES 


Two golds 
for Gao 
at diving 

SEATTLE (Reuter! - Gao Min. 
of China, showed off her 
supremacy on the springboard 
at toe Goodwill Games on 
Thursday with her second div- 
tng gold medal, despite recent 
inju ry and her country's scant 
regard for the one-meuv event 
“I paid very little attention to 
the one-metre springboard 
because it is not vety popular in 
China.” toe Olympic champion 
said. “What 1 did today 1 am 
very- satisfied with.” 

Gao. who launched toe com¬ 
petition wito a gold medal in toe 
three-metre springboard event 
on Tuesday, made it three 
diving golds in a row for China. 
Tan Gangde overcame in¬ 
fluenza to win toe men’s torec- 
meire event on Wednesday. 

In the boxing ring, the Soviet 
Union 2 nd toe United States 
ended the day with four wins 
apiece from their eight semi- , 
final showdowns. Andrei 
Kumynvka. the Soviet world 
middleweight champion, dealt 
the most spectacular blow, send¬ 
ing Jeremy Williams, aged 17, to 
the canvas with a crushing right 
in their light-beavyweigh! bout. 
The American spent a minute 
on the fioor before being helped 
to his corner. 

More US-Soviet contests are 
in toe offing as nine from the 
Soviet Union and eight from the 
United Slates are among the '4 
finalists. Three Cubans, includ¬ 
ing two world champions, are 
also seeking gold. 

The figure skating field in¬ 
cluded eight of the world’s top 
11 men. some presenting their 
new programmes, others stick¬ 
ing to last season's numbers for 
reasons of secrecy. There was 
m uch slippi ng ’a nd sliding. 
Viktor Petrenko, of toe Soviet 
Union, who won toe silver 
medal at toe Halifax worlds last 
March, was one who played safe 
in toe short. He finished abo»e 
Kurt Browning, the reigning 
champion, and Chns Bowman, 
of the United States. 

Browning, from Canada, 
needed hand support after a 
triple axel while Bowman ex¬ 
plained: “My programme is still 
in the experimental stage. I’m 
here just to try and be an 
American ambassador.” 

JiU Transry. toe world cham¬ 
pion, who had been expected to 
retire after Halifax. Jed an 
American sweep in the women’s 
short programme, with Nancy 
Kerrigan and Kristi Yamaguchi 
placed behind her. 

As expected, the Soviet domi¬ 
nance in ice dance continued at 
Seattle, the world champions. 
Manna Klimova and Sergei 
Ponomarenko, and their team 
colleagues. Maya Usova and 
Aleksandr Zhulin, leading after 
the first compulsory dance. The ’ 
pairs original saw Yekaterina 
Gordeyeva and Sergei Grinkov. 
Natalya Mishkutyonok and 
Artur Dmitriev and Yelena 
Becbke and Denis Petrov, all 
Soviet, taking the lead in that 
order. 


SPORT FOR THE DISABLED 


Namibian starters 
collect medals 

By Jane Wyatt 


SHOOTING 


FISHING 


p _ • ‘ v A Anglers told to be 

of British* more gentlemanly 


NAMIBIA, newly independent, 
and Yemen, newly united, have 
made their debuts, with 
contrasting results, at the world 
Stoke Mandevilie wheelchair 
games being staged by toe 
British Paraplegics Sports Soci¬ 
ety at toe Ludwig Gunman 
sports centre in Aylesbury. 

The six-man team from Na¬ 
mibia were able to make a last- 
minute entry after an injection 
of funds by their government. 
The results have been impres¬ 
sive with a gold medal, a silver 
and three bronze medals- 

Yemen have not equalled 
Namibia's performance and are 
at the bottom of toe medals 
table. The team was helped to 
toe games by the British Foreign 
Office's help in raising the foods 
required to buy specialist 
equipment. 

The momentous events in toe 
Middle East have, of course, 
cast a gloom over toe Kuwaiti 
team. Its members are stunned 
by the Iraqi invasion of their 
country, but are to remain in 
Britain to finish competing in 
the games. 


CRICKET 
Tour match 

n.o 

BRISTOL: Gloucestershire v Indians 
Britannic Assurance 
County Championship 
CHESTERFIELD: Derbyshire v Kent 
SOUTHEND: Essex v Notting¬ 
hamshire 

BOURNEMOUTH: Hampshire v 
Northamptonshire 
LEICESTER; Leicestershire v 
Worcestershire 

LORD'S: Middlesex v Glamorgan 
WESTON-SUPER-MARE: Somerset 
v Surrey 

HEADINGLEY: Yorkshire v 
Lancashire 

BOWLS 

Women's natoral chBnpgnstHps (Uam- 
IngionSpsL 

totem Counties Lsegotr. Ncrfok y 
Herttordsnre (Wymondhem Ceffj; Suffolk 
v Huntmqdonstsre (OeMnham Cherry 
Tree). Home Couitlee Lnooa; MJOdtesex 
s BeflcSWre (CafflCridga Parir). Oxttxd- 
shira v Susses (South Oxford); Surrey v 
BuckxtgnamsrwH (O Dean). HftfloiK! 
Canto Chaapkmttp; UrexunsWra 

vttotSngnamohirB lOeeinorpesj. mer- 

OMKtr. BKtoresftke V QtobtestersMre 
(Bedlorri Sorouph): Letcsstersnire * 
CamcndgBSJwa (Leicester SreoKMR: 
Northamptonshire v NHVP's 
nftigsffiorpe): Wrttsfcro » Durham (Trow- 


OTHER SPORT 

AMERICAN FOOTBALL: Coca-Cola 
Bcwt Manchester Spartans v Narthants 
Stcrm (Crystal Palace). 

ATHLETIC S: AAA/WAAA Cbampionstaps 
(Qfnnngnam). 

ctcung: National Track Champions mw 
lleicaswr}: Kellogg's Tour « Britan 
(Bridlington to Nwrastta-upon-Tyne). 
GOLF: Eftsfeh Amateur GhsmptanaNp 
Woodall Soa GC. Lines): weeuotx 
Wow»" s British Open (MUion KevwsSJ. 
MOTOR CYCUNO: FIM World Hoad- 
ftaeng Cha mporen tp (Cmte Qonmgani-. 
Nengrji Grass Track (Castle Donmgton). 
MOTOR RACING: Coca-Cola Brush Ken 
Grand PrufSilverstone): British Forming 3 
C#vjmo*snshie end Esso British Touring 
Car ChampttnSfte (Snet i ar to n). 

POLO: Goodwood Tournament (Cowdray 
Park. Sussex). 

SAILING: Land Raw Crws Wart. 
SHMTY: London CtuAenga Ct^fat 
Geete Aittaoc Grown, ftuaa?) 


Further evidence that the 
impact of international politics 
can now be felt in wheelchair 
sport came with Libya’s dis¬ 
qualification from the basket¬ 
ball event for refusing to play 
Israel. 

The international Stoke 
Mandevilie Games Federation 
hopes that its £1 million Sport¬ 
ing Wheels Worldwide appeal, 
launched this week, will be able 
to help just such developing 
countries as Namibia and Ye¬ 
men to improve sporting 
opportunities for disabled ath¬ 
letes and to encourage them to 
compete at international level. 

With one more day left of 
competition, Australia are head¬ 
ing the medals table followed bv 
(he United States, Spain and 
Britain. The British squad, with 
30 medals so far this year, is a 
long way short oflast year’s total 
of 64.The team manager, Roger 
Ellis, attributes this to a delib¬ 
erate policy of fielding a young 
and inexperienced squad as 
preparation for the next 
Paralympics. 


THE Great Britain rifle team, 
which opens its Canadian tour 
in Vancouver this weekend, has 
two double Queen’s Prize win¬ 
ners and two young marksmen 
who have surprised the Canadi¬ 
ans before (our Rifle Shooting 
Correspondent writes). 

Jeremy Langley, aged 22. won 
the Canadian overall champ¬ 
ionship two years ago on bis first 
trip with toe senior team. 

Glyn Barnett, aged 19, who 
was in toe Great Britain cadet 
team last year, almost did the 
same thing then, finishing 
second. 

John Bloomfield, who won 
toe Queen's Prize last week fora 
second time and Andrew 
Tucker, toe other double win¬ 
ner. have won leading Canadian 
awards several times. 


By Conrad Voss Barx 



(mrertckshknl: J WNta 


WEEKEND FIXTURES 


SWIMMING: ASA National 
championship (Leeds). 

WATER SWING; Grftfsti National Barefoot 
Champ*onsmps (Lincoln). 

TOMORROW 
CRICKET 
Tour match 
11.0 

BRISTOL: Gloucestershire v Indians 
Refuge Assurance League 

2.0.40 overs 

CHESTERFIELD: Derbyshire v 
Kent 11.05) 

SOUTHEND: Essex v 

Nottinghamshire 

BOURNEMOUTH: Hampshire v 
Northamptonshire 
LEICESTER: Leicestershire v 
Worcestershire 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL: BS B fflkfday-1.0. 
Action from Iasi season in tne NFL with 
cinematn Benqais against Miami 
Dalpfaira. 

ATHLETICS,- ITV 3.15-5 0pm and 5.10- 
5.50pm. The Panasonic National 

CtiampionsRips. 

AUSTRALIAN RULE8 FOOTBALL CA 
9^5-10.30am. 

BASEBALL Screensport 1230430pm. 
Action from America. 

BOXING: Euro a port 10.0-11.0pm. 
S cre w ia p o rt 2304.Dam ana 103tHna- 
ntght. Figm night M Ilia Forum. 
Screensport 11 0am-1£30pm, 
CANOEING? Sewenaport2L30-&0am and 
nudrcgnt-1.aam. 

CYCLING; C4 10.0-1030pm. The Kefeq* 
Touroismain. 

EQUESTRIANISM: Euro apart 12.30- 
6.0prn. The Wcria Games from Stockholm 
(shares coverage with Austrian Open 
lanrus). E umaport 11.0pm-1.0am. 
FOOTBALL- Eurnport 7. M 30pm. The 
European Junior Ctnmpionsfep Rnel 
from Hungary. 

Screensport 4.04.0am.' The 
USPGA Sue* Open. 

OTANDSTANO: sec 1 TZJ04*5pm. 
Special Olyniptca. Cystine Tha Ntvonat 
ownpionsnips from Lscasor. Show 
Jwnping Tfra World EquuMan (Samoa 
from Srootfroim. Radng: The Z0. 230 
and 3.10 races from Goodwood. 

MOTOR CYCLING: Sooenaport &0- 
i .Cam. Aden tram Czochoskwawa. 
•WWIJWWi Screenaport 3.04.0pm 
«r,aB.M.0pin. 


LORD’S: Middlesex v Glamorgan 
WESTOfFSUPEMAARE: Somerset 
v Surrey 

EASTBOURNE: Sussex v 

Warwickshire 

SCARBOROUGH: Yorkshire v 
Lancaslwe 

W NOR^ COUNTIES. CHAMWOMSHffi 
BaWerd: Bedfordshire v Cumbrta: 
Bowden: Cneshfre v OxfOnMwa: Dor- 
Chester Dorset v Berkshire; UkentoE 

NcrtaikvUneotneNrB: MeriborwphcSk 

•8* Wtehtie ¥ BucMngftamahlraV 
BOWLS 

Women's National Chamnionatiipa 

a'jsraeresasas: 

{jgjjjgSSZ* ''eounty IT ffis 

SPORT ON TV 

A 15 * 11 BE* The ago. 330. 

2J6^-I5pa h^v 
ngfrts oi New Zealand v AistraBa. 

SHOW JUMPMQ; Screemport 7JL 
9, 0am. FatetBftxj Jumping Derby from 

fWOOKEB: B88 lOJUN dday «nd RO- 
IQ.Qektv The Continental Chamnoe. 
SPORTSOSSAf ess 830-10,0am, 1.0. 

TO3 °- 

TBBB& Ewoepart UMOOp*. The 
Austrian open from Kitrbuhel 
%J « "RP g il M-11-Own and &raopm 
TffeCanaAanOpen. 

Tomorrow 

««WCAN FOOTBALL: Cl lOJtrekF 

gagj graaartfis 

oas aa " ,H «" 

foo ™* u = 

gaeBa aaategBg 

nASsrwa 

HSSi3&&:«— - 

Ct KK£T: 5kr 11.05-6.0pm. The Refto 


THE Salmon and Trout Associ¬ 
ation (Sara) has updated advice 
on how anglers should behave 
which was first given in The 
Treat vse qf Fysshynge in 1496 
and has been updated many 
scores of times by angling 
writers during the last 500 years 
with little noticeable effect 
The Game Angling Code, a 
small pamphlet produced by 
Sata. supported by Laphroaig 
Whisky, in consultation with 17 
sporting organisations, is toe 
latest version of bow anglers 
should behave according to the 
social mores of-the tune. In 
some cases the. code is an 
improvement on toe 1496 ver¬ 
sion, in other cases less so. 

For example, the new code 
merely says that anglers should 
be discouraged from selling their 
fish, whereas the Treaiyse 
comes out more strongly by 
saying that anglers must not use 
their sport “for covetousness, 
merely for toe increasing or 
saving of their money”. 

The Treatyse, in saying that, 
gets down to toe basic problem 


that was ^so apparent in the 
reported “astronomic"’ killing 
mid sale of salmon by game 
fishers on the Tay test year. The 
Sata approach is more general, 
more tactful, does not mention 
the word greed, and comes 
down in essence to the ex¬ 
pression. of pious hopes tint 
anglers and fishery owners 
should behave like gentlemen. 

The code is exemplary. No 
one can quarrel with precepts' 
such as “moderation, courtesy 
and consideration for others are 
the marks of a sporting angler". 
Such structured phrases, how¬ 
ever, do give the impression, 
possibly unfairly,.that toe au¬ 
thors during tbdr deliberations, 
to paraphrase Diaradi, became 
inebriated with- their high 
morality. 

The Game Angling Code is 
available from toe Salmon and 
Trout Association, Fishmongers i 
Haft. London. Bridge, London 
EC4R 9EL orTrdnJ the associ¬ 
ation’s stand at todayVGame 
Fair in Maigam Park,: South 
Wales. -rf 


OTHER SPORT 

AMERICAN FOOTBALL: America Bowfc 
108 A "**« 

C*ggNa Junior Europe* 
gagSffiBtf, Tour of Britain {York 

Worw Roan-1 

J^rewRAC»^coc*<i*i Brikari 

gBpS-ss 

POLO: Goodwood Polo Townenwit 
(Cowdr^PWk.SussaiO. ,oum * m ** 
RAU^ITO: British Championships 


EGUESTHMIOStt; emamit HAm . 1 

ggg* £* » pt gjV n.Qam. uspga 
I!-^c»aSnGMw. Ci g£S 

SffiffSSgJSSXSJSS 

swwpdrt mo-11.0, mgtifigha. 

®J JO ^“«iuGffl^.a. o ., a0Dra 

too Comments) 

SSS&s 

s£fioE£ w & ^ 7 - 3 °p ,n **"•*«■» 


TRIATHLON^ - 

Mass pursuit 
of place in 
British team 

By Ian Sweet 1 
BRITISH triathletes have their 
final opportunity to gain auto¬ 
matic selection for the British 
team for toe forthcoming Euro¬ 
pean short-course champion¬ 
ships at Linz, Austria, on August 

in the face at Enfoenon>Bifc, 
near Otney Buckinghamshire, 
tomorrow, the first two eligible 
men and women will gain places 
m the British team. Only Simon 
ffsaag and Beniie Shrosbree 
have so for booked toeir places 

JS"™* which is 

Py^itocOlyropie distance ofl 3 

*** « w WB, 4(Han 
for the cycling and iOkro for toe 
«s also- pan of toe national 
"“fong safes. The Otympfc 
22K2P* R , obin Brew, andSw 
•*« Madmen 

SHwasS 

spsr ~ 

.J™. TPWri wtkBjt 


apnngman and it s 
bea formality for them to 
first and second and joi 
British team. ■ 

The race has more that 

®*ttries.- which ■ has ■ cans 
*Mghi problem for 

«gn«sers.wJiowiHnowl 

rompnsuig the men’s ctiv 
women, suvts at 9an 
off ai lS-m 




«ww»andiaja../ n - a 

































THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


SPORT 27 


RUGBY UNION 



The look is lean and mean for motorcycling’s grand prix 


MARC ASPUND 


Argentinian ranks 


From David Hands. 

RUGBY CORRESPONDENT, 
BUENOS AIRES ■: 

*F ARGENTINA play todav 

week a»o when losing 25-02 in 
ine first international, then 
toe sasms evety prospect of 
England returning home on 
Monday with a rare 20 series 
wm over the Pumas. That 
wow represent a big salvage 
operation from a u>ur whose 
first fortnight proved • so 
disastrous. 

Thai opinion is shared by 
Hugo Porta, at one time 
generally acclaimed as the best 
srand-offhalfin the world and 
u»e author, with 21 points, of 
Banco Nation’s win against 
England in the first match of 
the tour. It is Porta’s belief;, 
home out by what England 
have seen, here outside the 
international arena, that his 
country possesses the players 
to indulge in a different style, 
modelled, as much as any¬ 
thing, on -Banco's own ap¬ 
proach, which is to play the 
game through the backsJ 

It is common knowledge 
that Porta and Rodolfo 
O’Reilly, the Pumas’ -coach 
who resigned this week, do not 
see eye to eye. O’ReiHy is 
perceived as selectmg players 
with whom he has formed a 
dose relationship, which does 
not necessarily mean the best 
available players. How, Porta 
asked, did the Pumas last 
week expect to score points, 
except by goal-kicking, when 
they chose two wings who do 
not play in that position and a 
full back who had not played 
for two months? 

•■^The rugby I like is not the 
style the Pumas play," Porta 
said, reflecting the influence ■ 
Pierre Villepreux, the Toil- • 
louse coach, had on him when 
Banco took part in the 1986 
Masters tournament in 
France. Porta is clearly bitter 
that Jacques Fouroux, the 
Hunch national coach, has 
provided a role model for 
O'Reilly and Raul Sanz, his 
assistant, is employing a gamp 


The team's 


vu» iS. -* ScrtM 

(Bums Afrnc 




uifejJocfcay 

0 *—*><***««** 

top(OrTM), wncdrtofl 
■PSnVjT r d bcttiiS 
® D 

. R J HB {Bfifij'c J 

toSFu’zysis***- 4 * 

, JrSPV' ■ ° fmnH f 
ICRadbrniSah), WA 

»rs). P 

i. 0 

J Thow J G 

0*wr (Northampton),DW| 

■Mna*. B Kinny (Auatrata). 

do minat ed by big forwards 
-with little inclination to use 
the creative ability of the 
backs. 

“Argentina must try 
another type of game and 
choose the players for that 
game,” Porta said. “Whoever 
replaces O’Reilly must be 
given more than just one 
chance to prepare the team. 
He needs more than the tour 
to Britain in October because 
rt would be very stupid not to 
appreciate that . Argentina 
oould well lose the four big 
games [against England,'Scot¬ 
land, Ireland and the Barbar¬ 
ians] on that tour. 

“Many people thought that 
Banco Nati6n and the way we 
play rugby would work only in 


area of England's side, the 
pack. “How much experience 
is there in the forwards?” he 
asked. “Six of them have 
played a lot of international 
rugby. Where are the inexperi¬ 
enced English players? In the 
backs. 

“I don’t think it was clever 
to cany the battle to your 
forwards. Skinner had a good 
game but probably he was 
helped because Argentina 
took the bafl inside all the 

time. I liked the way the No. 8 
[Dean Ryan] played and 
Hodgkinson’s kicking was 
very good.” 

But since the only change to 
the Argentine side is in the 
front row, where the experi¬ 
enced Diego Cash returns, it 
seems unlikely that Argenti¬ 
na’s tactical approach will 
switch significantly from one 
Saturday to the next. That 
being so, England, with an 
u n changed XV, have a far 
better idea of the problems to 
be overcome, though Will 
Calling, their captain, eschews 
thoughts that they now have 
. the measure of the P umas . 

u rm quite sure they will 
have done a lot more prepara¬ 
tion, perhaps on playing a 
looser game or coping'with 
our bade row,” Carling said. 
Equally, England have worked 
on limiting lachetti’s supply of 
lineout bafl and their own ball 
control, which has been weak 
throughout the tour. While 
Argentina may be taxed to 
offer a different tactical ap¬ 
proach, so too may England, 
whose backs have contributed 
so little to this tour that there 



our domestic game, so xt was ___ _ ^ 

very importaht foatwe^ayed is no reason to suppose that 
well against England to show they can now suddenly do so. 


that we could rala*. on inter¬ 
national teams." 

Porta does not exclude the 
possibility of a return .-'to 
international rugby - even at 
tbe age of 38, given a coach 
such as H6ctor Silva, with 
whom he is in sympathy.This 
weekend though, he must 
wait to seeif Argentina repeat 
last week’s mistake of taking 
play , to the most experienced 


-Carlos Menem, the Ar¬ 
gentine president, has clearly 
taken the bint. At one stage he 
hoped to attend today’s game, 
but instead he must be in 
Colombia for a presidential 
inauguration and will miss the 
chance to see England's-pack, 
allied to Hill’s chivvying and 
Hodgkinson’s accurate boot, 
taking the spring out of the 
Pumas' stride. 


Touch and go: Eddie Lawson on his Y amah a takes Goddard Corner at Doningtoo Park yesterday during practice for tomorrow's grand prix 

Schwantz burns in pursuit of Rainey 


By Steve Acteson 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Referees call time on feeding 


REFEREES have brim in¬ 
structed to keep a docer warefa 
on feeding into scrums next 
season. Fred Lindop, the 
controller of the referees, has 
issued a circular asking referees 
not to allow senior halves too 
much leeway when they have 
the advantage of the loose bead 
and the put-u. 

Last season many half backs 
were blatantly feeding the ball 
into second row and even to the 
feet of the loose forward. 

Kevin Iro, the-Wxgan and 
New Zealand centre, will miss 


. ByrnraMAocuN 

the first sbe wedcs of the'season 
because of a cartilage operation 
on an injury, which affected his 
pe rform an ces for New Zealand 
a g ai n st Great Britain this sum¬ 
mer. 

Chris O’Sullivan, ;the Can¬ 
berra Raiders stand-off half, has 
agreed-to join Warrington when 
the Australian season ends next 
month and is contracted to stay 
until the end of. the British 
season. 

The future of the Halifax dub, 
which has debts <jf £760,000, is 
Still in the balance. A con¬ 


sortium of local businessmen 
has offered £130,000 for the 
dub, on the condition that a 
small group of players who are 
refiising to accept reduced terms 
for next season sign up. 

The club administrator, 
Roger Marsh, told a meeting of 
ensditore yesterday that the 
consortium would only buy 
Halifax if Brendan Hill, the 
Great Britain prop, Scott 
Rawlinson and George Parkin- j 
son agreed trims. Rawlinson 
and Parkinson are owed over | 
£40.000 on contracts 


KEVIN Schwantz, winner of 
four races already this season, 
put himself on course for the 
perfect siart to the British 
motorcycling grand prix tomor¬ 
row when he steered his Suzuki 
to the fastest time after the 
second practice session at 
Donington Park yesterday. 

Undera fierce sun. the Texan, 
who still believes he can catch 
Wayne Rainey, of California, 
the world championship leader, 
despite a defiat of 30 points, 
clocked lmin 33.543sec. 
Rainey, on a Yamaha, was 
second fastest in 1:33.733 and 
Wayne Gardner, of Australia, 
on a Honda, third in 1:33.S36. 
the only other man to break the 
1:34 barrier. There are two more 
practice sessions today. 

- In the 250cc practice. Carlos 
Card us, of Spain, the winner of 
the French grand prix two weeks 
ago, was fastest in 1:37.403 on 
his Honda. The world champ¬ 
ionship leader. John Kocinski. 
of the United Slates, who is 
seven points up on Card us, 
could manage only the fourth 
fastest time on his Yamaha. 

Four riders in the SOOcc class 
— Schwantz, Rainey, Gardner 
and Eddie Lawson, of the 
United Stales — beat 1:35.51. 
the official lap record held by 


Lawson, the defending world 
champion. Having been side¬ 
lined for some time through 
injury. Lawson is fully aware 
that his title will go, and his job 
now is to stay behind Rainey, 
his teammate, but ahead of 
Schwaiuz. 

Britain's hopes rest with Niall 
Mackenzie, fifth in practice. 
Last year there was a roar 
reminiscent of a good night at 


Wembley when the 29-year-old 
Scott from Dunblane briefly led 
on a Marlboro Yamaha to 
conjure visions of a first British 
500cc grand prix success since 
Barry Sheene, nine years ago. 

Worn tyres ended that brief 
illusion of glory’ and at the end 
of last season Mackenzie had 
been dropped by’ the Marlboro 
team and was contemplating a 
1990 season of 250cc racing. 



TODAY: Official timed practice: 125ce 9.45-10.15 and ZOO-2.30: SOOcc: 
10.30-11.10 and 2.45-3-25; 250cc: 11.25-1Z05 and 3.40420; sidecars: 
12-2D-1Z50 and4.35-5.05; superbikes: 5.20-5.27, untuned warm up; Motor 
Cycle News TT superbike championship race (15 laps): 5.40. 
TOMORROW: Untimed practice: 125cc 9.00-9.20; 250CG 9.30-9.50; SOOcc: 
10.00-1020; sidecars: 10.30-10.50. Rothmans 125cc British grand prix (24 
laps): 11.30; Shell 250cc British grand prix (26 laps): 1.00; Shed 500cc 
British grand prix (30 laps): Z30; Shell sidecar British grand prix (24 laps): 
4.00; superbikes: 5.30-5.35, untimed warm up; Motor Cych News 
superbike race (15 laps): 5.50. 


before receiving a call from the 
Lucky Strike Suzuki team to 
replace Kevin Magee, of Austra¬ 
lia, who sustained serious head 
injuries last March during a 
crash at I OOmph in America. 

With such support behind 
him Mackenzie has thrived, as 
third places in both the German 
and Yugoslav grands prix tes¬ 
tify. albeit that they were 
achieved with something of a 
guilty conscience. At Donington 
this week a first meeting with 
Magee since the accident dis¬ 
pelled such thoughts. 

"Kevin was great He just 
joked he was going to use me for 
a punch bag because 1 was doing 
so well on his bike and he looked 
almost recovered. 1 was so 
happy, I told him that if 
someone had to ride his bike it 
might as well be me and I 
certainly don't feel guilty any¬ 
more." Mackenzie said. 

"If ever I had the chance to 
win a grand prix then this is iL 
The crowd nearly went hysteri¬ 
cal when they saw me in front 
last year. Tyres let me down 
then but this lime they won't. 
The only possible setback is my 
lack of experience on the ma¬ 
chine compared to the other top 
factory riders." 

It is two of them that are 
expected to silence jingoistic 
roars on Sunday — Rainey, the 


present leader by a straight and a 
curve or two. and Schwantz. last 
year's winner at Donington. 

Michelin, meanwhile, is to 
close its motorcycling grand prix 
tyre service at the end of the 
season in flavour of other motor 
sports. The French manufac¬ 
turer's public relations manager, 
Chris Rogers, said yesterday 
that the company, which sup¬ 
plies most of the SOOcc teams 
with race tyres, would close the 
lyre testing, development and 
fitting services after the final 
races in September. 

Michelin. who ended their 
involvement in Formula One 
motor racing in 1984, have been 
in motorcy cling since 1973. 

PRACTICE LEADERS: SOOcc (alter sec¬ 
ond session)* 1. K5chwantziUS). Suzuki. 
1-33.54; Z W Rainey (US). Vamatia, 
1:33 73; 3, v, Gardner (Aus), Honda. 
1:33.86. 4, E Lawson (US). Yamaha; 
1.3431; 5. N Mackenzie tGS). Suzuki; 
1:35.47; 6. C Sarron (Fr). Yamaha. 
1*35.54 250cc (after second session): 1. 
C Cantus (Sp), Honda. 1:37.403; 2, 
LCadatora (It). Yamaha, 1:37.497; 3. A 
Montes (Fr). Apnfta. 1137.774; 4. 
JKocmski (US). Yamaha. 1:37.872; 5. W 
Zedenberg |Neih). Honda. 1:38.178; 6. C 
Lavado (Ven). Apnfca. 1:38229; 7. H Bradl 
<WG). Honda. 1:3B.342 ; 8. J Cornu (Swuz). 
Honda. 1 38376: 9. M STwrazu (Japan). 
Honda, 1:38.378; 10. M WUtvtwt (WGj, 
Apnba. 1:38512. 125cc; 1. J Martinez 
(Sp). Rotax. t .44.19: 2. L Capirosa (It). 
Honda. 1:4420; 3. B Casanova (M). 
Honda. 1:4451: 4. F Gresmi (It). Honda. 
1:45.07; 5. □ Random (ID, Honda, i :45.14; 
6, H Spaan (Haiti). Honda. 1:4520. 


BOWLS 


Former champions 
fall to outsiders 


By David Rhys Jones. 


TWO rank outsiders upset the 
form book at Royal Lymington 
Spar yesterday, defeating a 
couple of former champions in 
the Liverpool'Victoria EWBA 
two-wood, singles cham¬ 
pionship. 

Gill Fitzgerald, an elegant 
deliverer of a bawl, beat, the 
favourite, Jayne Roy lance, thus 
gaining revenge for a first round 

defeat in 1988, when North 
Walsham's 'Commonwealth 
Gaines bronze medal winner 
went on to win the title. 

Since that defeat on her first 
visit to these championships, 
Fitzgerald has monopolised the 
two-wood event in North¬ 
amptonshire. where she plays 
for the Kettering Lodge Club. 

Noble played hockey for 
Bedfordshire, and confesses she 
never thought she would take to 

bowls — which, she first tried 
eight years ago. She played more 
calmly and consistently than her 
redoubtable opponent. Irene 
Molyneux, of Oxford, the 1_979 
champion, winning 15-12. 

Molyneux. disappointed that 
the semi-final was stayed on the 
heavier green D after being 


scheduled for the free-running 
green C, conceded that Noble 
had beaten her “on long jacks”, 
ten was not happy with the way 
she or the green had played. 

Hopes of an all-Cambridge¬ 
shire pairs final were dashed 
when Jean Baker and Margaret 
Bonsor, of Alfteton, over¬ 
whelmed the Millers, of March, 
26-11, but Maureen Christmas 
and her daughter Jenny Tun¬ 
bridge, of Cambridge Chester¬ 
ton, scored a five on the 
sixteenth end to move four 
shots clear of Marlow’s Ann Cox 
and Lynne TherwelL before 
winning 18-16. 

RE&JLTS: Two w a nd rt ng li a. Mid 
round: I Mofynoux (Oxfonl CQ bl F 
Linbony (FteW Ptacs. Brighton), IB-5; Y 
Groom (Straw) M D Haddock (New- 
martatt). 17-1£B Noble (Luton) M M Pries 


(Stratton, Budo) 
■ 15-10; J Cums 
16-7; J 
bl E Andrew 


(Burnham), 15-10: D 
DID Young 
(YattOQ) bt 
Roytoncofl 
(BlacKpoon. IB-4; G 
Longs) btB Atherton 

15-1-47 S ChamtM 
CttingSonAbtMAten 
IB-4. Q uaUHfciate: 

1545; Noble M Davy 15-1 
Gurtts 1B-& Fitzgerald bt 
3. Palre quamr-a na t: A 
Ihelwsfl (Marioer) bt E Bird and A Glow 
(Sherwood. Nottingham), 28-8. 



Poole close to place in 
Scottish history books 


By Gordon Dunwoodie 


ALAN Poofe, of Pi big, moved 
to within two games of creating 
history when he produced, two 
convincing performances yes¬ 
terday to beat Gordon Logan, of 
Kirkliston, and John Foy, of 
Stobhili.to move through to this 
morning's semi-finals of the 
Scottich singles championship. 

Poole, the junior champion in 

1985, is attempting to become 
the first player to complete the 
double of junior and senior 
singles titles. He was an un¬ 
expectedly easy winner Of his 
morning dash’with Logan, the 
British Police champion. Poole 
had to work harder for his 21-14 

quarter-final win over the last 
nope of Glasgow, Foy, finishing 
with doubles on The last two 
ends to complete a 21-14 
victory. 

Willie Higgins, of Loanhead. 
who lad beaten past world 
indoor champion, Hugh Cuff 


on Wednesday could not re¬ 
capture that form in yesterday's 
second round and went down 
21-9 to Ian ..McDonald,' of. 
Rattray. . 


RESULTS! 

Pettigrew f 

S Thomson 
HAPooie' 

10; JEo ~ 

J potin,------ 

Recreation) 19:1 McDonald (Rattray) 21, 
W Higgins BL um hesd) 9; S Thomson 



i21.ASMois(Udsion)11; 
'i2l.DKen-ff5»e®feSs) 
_J.G Logan (Krkasion) 
2l,yVHuiter(Stow)l7; 
i)2lU3McKate (Yarrow 


W Higgins (U an hesd) 9, 3 Thomson 
(Castiapark) 2T. t Sneddon (Tu«»dy) 19; 
X BraJay (Qmawngt) 21 . W Hay *• 


(Oban) it xmnarrtRate: SttnonThomson 
b. Pattern 13;P00to2i. Foy 14; (Man 
21. McDonald flr Stmn Thomson 21. 
Bradley 3. Jtnior wh^m aooand round: 
& SMay (Newgate) 21, A Sneddon 
*■-*-—-■ Tremens) 15; A CMasdos- 
) 21. M Cmatdn (Oban) 18: R 
_ . ranreer) 21- A Davis (fiatfci) 

13T9 Craig (Potaabe) 21. S Amteon 
(Thom J tebank) 15; G flyrai (SranoBino ail i ) 
21. C Leaver (Strattmore) 12; R Broco 
(Sasthotas421.GljMiC9tens(Balgpnie) 
14: R Oreham (LWtass) 2l. WTifJ 
(MBton of Campaie) Ift W KBans (Port 
fetasaewf 21. a Thomson (CotMfl) 
CtetettS i ’ Ite ste ; Creig21. 1ft ‘ 

C^jgUBfa21. gM<y1B ; Botea 21, FJyno 
IBp KMiflf 211 Gttwn 9* 


EQUESTRIANISM 


Dutchman leads after close 
finish in carriage marathon 


By Jenny MacArthur in Stockholm 


AFTER one of the closest 
finishes to a marathon com¬ 
petition. Ad Aarts, a 
Netherlands riding instructor 
driving .his team of Dutch 
warm Woods, held on to his 
overnight lead in the world 
carriage driving championships 
here yesterday by the slender 
margin of 0.2 of a poinL 

Tomas Eriksson, of Sweden, 
and Jozsef Bozsik, of Hungary, 
are in second and third place, 
but fewer than five marks 
separate the lop five drivers. 
George Bowman, Britain’s nat¬ 
ional champion, lying in fifth 
place, could Teach the medal 
position today if any of the 
riders above him make a mis¬ 
take in the final phase, the 
obstacle driving. One fault -to¬ 
day, when the competitors have 
to drive through a series of 
cones, adds five penalties to a 
driver’s score. 

The overnight team positions 
could also change today. The 
Dutch, the champions, have a 


lead of just under seven points 
over Sweden. The Hungarians 
are next, three points ahead of 
West Germany. Great Britain 
are fifth. 

Britain's two best perfor¬ 
mances yesterday, came from 
Bowman and Peter Mum. 
David Saunders, the third team 
member, had the slowest time 
and was the discard score. 

For Bowman, yesterday's 
performance was tinged with 
disappoinleraent. "The horses 
have been going so well recently. 
I think I just tried too hard 
today. I was going into some of 
the hazards too fast." he said. 

•• The .eight hazards- on the 
course, the equivalent of the 
cross-country fences of three- 
day eventing, come at the end of 
a gruelling 16-mile course. One 
penalty is awarded for evepr five 
seconds spent negotiating a 
hazard. 

Ysbrand Chardon, of The 
Netherlands, the defending 

world champion and the first to 


Whitakers will have to 
dig deep into reserves 


From Jenny MacArthur 


MICHAEL and John Whitaker, 
of Britain, need all their skill, 
plus a large measure of luck, 
today if they are to qualify for 
the final stage tomorrow of the 
world_ show jumping 
championship. 

Michael Whitaker is fifth and 
his-brother sixth as they enter 
the crucial third round today, a 
two-part grand prix which de¬ 
cides the four riders who will 
contest the dramatic “change of 
horses” final in the Olympic 
Stadium tomorrow afternoon. 

Nick Skdu>n, who is in 16th 
place, is the only other British 
rider competing today. David 
Broome just missed qualifying 
after finishing 24th in the team 


event .on Thursday. 

The four riders above the 
Whitakers — Eric Navel, ol 
France, Greg Best, of the United 
States. Ludo Philippaerts, from 
Belgium, and Otto Becker, of 
West Germany — all jumped 
superbly on Thursday and look 
capable of jumping dear rounds 
today. 

Navel, whose eight-year-old 
horse is in his first season of 
international competition, is the 
most likely to succumb to the 
pressure of the occasion. The 
atmosphere is heightened today 
by making niters go in reverse 
otder of meat- Navet, who is 
lying in first place, will have to 
go last into the stadium. 


go yesterday, put the pressure on 
the remaining 52 competitors 
with a test attacking round 
marred only by a small delay at 
the eighth hazard when one of 
his leaders bad a difference or 
opinion. 

Bowman, who said that the 
marathon course was "not 
tough enough for our type of 
horses — it’s a picnic course”, 
recorded the fastest time of the 
day through the water, the third 
hazard, with his team of 
Cumberland Cobs. He had a 
slight delay at the fifth hazard 
when he had to rein back after 
almost going the wrong side of a 
post, but he otherwise com¬ 
pleted the course without in¬ 
cident. Joe Moore, Lhe British 
chef d’equipe. said that the 
course had been deliberately 
made easier by increasing the 
time allowed on some of the 
marathon phases in order to 
prevent any exhausted horses in 
iheheaL 

The most dramatic perfor¬ 
mance of the day was by Bozsik, 
a chirpy. 38-year-old Hungar¬ 
ian. with his team of "flying 
Lippizaners’ \ Their exh tiara ting 
round was the fastest of the day. 
despite a short delay to repair 
some harness. 

Tjeerd Velstra, a former 
world champion and the tech¬ 
nical delegate here, has helped 
ensure an exciting final com¬ 
petition today by setting the 

track-clearance distance — the 
distance between the cone and 
the carriage wheel - at 30cm 
rather than 40cm. the maximum 
width allowed. “That would be 
too easy for the riders." Velstra, 
who used to emplov Aarts as his 
groom, said yesterday. 

RESULTS: Ctertm Driving: Ouamtaht 
iwdts after maftthM: 1 A Aarts (Nem). 
131.2; 2 T Ericsson (Swa).131 4: 3 J 
Bozsik (Hun). 1315; 4 Y Chardon 133.0:5 
G Bowman (GB). 1365: 6 J-E PBhlsson 
(Sws). 140Z Outer Britteh ptedfin: 17. P 
Mum 165A 28, o sanaere iea.fr. 36. L 
RuOdtman 2263. Team ptadnem (alter 
marathon): 1. Matnariands _ 264.2; 2. 
Sweeten 271.6; 3. Hungzry 2335,4 1^ 
Germany 295.4; 5. Britain 3015; 6, United 
States 3062. 


Yachting competition winners 


Mr T.H. Vickers is the winner pf 
The Times’ competition offer¬ 
ing a very special visit to Cowes 
Regatta as the guest of Cham¬ 
pagne Mumm, the sponsors Of 
the biennial Admiral's Cup 
series. 


The prize programme for Mr 
Vickers and a companion will 
include travel to and from 
Cowes, accommodation on the 
nights or August (Band Il.and 
a fuH day watching the raring 
and enjoying the hospitality. Mr 


Vickers lives at Marjorie Grove, 
London SWI1. 

The answers were: 1. Great 
Britain; 2, Mike McIntyre and 
Bryn Vaile; 3, 1833; 4, 

The Princess Royal; 5, New 
Zealand. 


HOCKEY 

Absentees 
weaken 
tour squad 

By Joyce Whitehead 

THE Great Britain squad to 
tour New Zealand and Australia 
for a month, beginning in the 
first week in October, will be 
named tomorrow following a 
training weekend in Leicester. 
Twenty-six players were invited 
to attend from those available. 

The England captain. Sandy 
Lister, and Vicki Dixon were 
two of the England team who 
did not put their names forward 
having been to Australia in 
May. Mandy Langridge. the 
youngest member of the Eng¬ 
land Squad in the World Cup. 
has withdrawn following an 
apendix operation. Jill Atkins is 
also a non-starter and here is 
posed a problem. The with¬ 
drawal of Allans, who was 
willing to tour but could not get 
time off. must make future 
consent for time off work for a 
number of players very 

doubtful. 

Atkins is a hockey dev¬ 
elopment Officer appointed by 
the two national associations: 
the Hockey Association and the 
All-England Women's Hockey 
Assocation together with Brad¬ 
ford Education Authority. 

Cranleigh School, on tour in 
Australia, were very dis¬ 
appointed after their first match 
in Perth. The Presbyterian La¬ 
dies College, which included 
four Australian internationals, 
beat them 4-0, but two days later 
they drew 1-1 with St "Mary's 
and went on to Melbourne. 

Their first three matches in a 
quadrangular tournament were 
played on grass. They lost the 
first 0-1 to Geelong Grammer 
School, their hosts. On the 
artifical pitch at Royal Park they 
beat Methodist Ladies College 
5-4 after being 3-0 down. 

Their goal scorers were Jakki 
Hammond (2), Miranda Wood- 
leigh, Tanya Chapman and Nat¬ 
alie Humphrey. They then 
played Geelong Gram mer 
School on the artificial pitch and 
won 2-0. 

RESULTS: Parte July 24: Presbyterian 
lattes CoBoga 04; 5ft St Mary s 1-1. 
Melbourne Quadrannriar Tournament, 
29: Geelong GS O-l. Qeetong College 3-0; 
MonmgoO-1; Metnostea Uafes C&asga 5- 
4. August 1: Geelong GS 24). 

Qmt Britain trial**: L Bayfas. 5 
BrimBje, g Brown, K Brawl. V Haflam, F 
Las, C UWefl. M Nova. M Picttss, j 
J Sbcsnttb, A SwindlehursL S 
VWigftt (Eng). J Bums, J Monown (N ko). M 

Coutte. W Fraser. 8 Lawno, P Lyon, A 

—BssfcaaBB6f H-,,ifcF 


POLO 


Alberdi carries it 
for Rosamundo 


By John Watson 


ROSAMUNDO (received Vi) 
took on Ellers Lon Black at 
Ambersham, Sussex, yesterday 
in the semi-finals of the 
Cowdray Park Challenge Cup 
and beat them 7V--5. The other 
semi-final resulted in a 10-516 
win for Santa Fe against Your 
Name Here (received 2Yz). Santa 
Fe meet Rosamundo for the 
final at 3pm on Sunday. 

Rosamundo fielded Simon 
Tosh, from the Royal Berkshire 
Club, to substitute for the 
player-patron, David Pearl, and 
Santiago Socasf played instead 
of their injured Mexican. Anto¬ 
nio Herrera. 

Alejandro Alberdi, the 
Rosamundo No. 3. who is 
scheduled for promotion to the 
top 10 handicap in October, 
quickly showed him self to be the 
most formidable man on the 
pitch and. with four goals from 
his mallet in the first couple of 
chukkas. Rosamundo led 4 Vi-2 
before the start of the third. 

But Ellers ton Black, nicely 
pivoted on the New Zealander. 


Stuart Mackenzie, fought back 
gallantly. Alan Kent formed his 
familiarly strong duo with 
Mackenzie and Viv Evans 
proved a sharp No. 1. If 
Mackenzie had not missed so 
many penally shots Ellerston 
might well have overtaken. As it 
was, they kepi dosing the gap 
until, in the fifth and last 
chukka. they made it 5-5 Vi. 

But Socas and Tosh, the 
Rosamundo forwards who had 
been working increasingly well 
on Alberti's axis, then scored 
twice 1 to make certain of their 
triumph. Rod Matthews, who so 
distinguished himself as the all- 
England back at Windsor last 
Sunday, looked just as good in 
that slot for Rosamundo 
yesterday. 

ROSAMUNDO: 1. S Tosh (2); 2. s Socas 
(6): 3. AAttw di (B); back, RlMatthews (4). 

HURSTON BLACK: 1 , V Ewans (tk 2 . A 

SEJjy- S Madcenae W. back. J 
YOUR NAIffi HERE: 1. W 1-iwaw ist- s a 

(5); 2. c Forsyth (8); 
3. H Cratto (% tack, B Bond-aott (1). 


German borrowed P ulls taken back 


Notts County have signed the 
Bavem Munich footballer. 
Martins Hamann. on loan. The 
West German j forward, aged 22, 
who would cost County at least 
£100,000 to sign, has been on 
loan to Fortuna Cologne for IS 
months. 


Tony Pulis, the Gillingham 
defender, returned to Bourne¬ 
mouth as player-coach yes¬ 
terday. Harry Redknapp. the 
football club's manager, plans to 
use Pulis as cover for his first 
team but sees his work with the 
reserves as a priority. 



UPDATED DAILY WfTH PREVIEWS, PRACTICE, 
QUALIFYING AND RACE REPORTS FOR SUNDAYS 


BRITISH 
GRAND PRIX 

AT DONINGTON 

AND 


MOTOCROSS'GP HOTLINE- 


With ADAM DUCKWORTH 


ROAD RACE GP HOTLINE 


With MAT OXLEY 



BELGIAN 500 GP 
AT NAMUR 

aSpperralnua dwap rate. 38pper mroie otfwr times. 



MamSofutioreBSuRH 


















_ 28 SPORT/RACING 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Q]Q The Queen Mother’s love of jump racing still shines after forty years o f changing fortunes 

winning ride I In the realm of hope and glory 

to that rainbow 


lilt RE is nothing very spe¬ 
cial about Richard Lionheart 
who runs in the Dimplex 
Tango Handicap Chase at 
Newton Abbot this afternoon. 
But Mills and Boon could 
publish a best-seller about his 
jockey, Gareth Chari es-Jones, 
and the jockey's wife, Jessica. 
Richard Lionheart is a 10 - 
r-old chestnut who knows 
s way to the winning post in 
point-to-point races, was 
successful in a novice chase 
two or three years ago, and is a 
“very safe ride” who is gentle 
enough for his farmer-owner- 
trainer’s daughter to ride 
around the country lanes of 
Devon, Over the 2 mile 5 
furlongs of the 2.15 today, he 
has something a little less than 
a favourite’s chance. 

So much for the horse; what 
of the navigator.,,? Gareth 
Charles-Jones is 29 years old 
and slight enough to go un¬ 
noticed in any raceday crowd 
but with a heart almost too big 
for his 5ft 5in frame. A man 
who once fell heavily and 
□early died after being kicked 
by passing horses and who — 
like a more famous jump 
jockey. Bob Champion — has 
fought and beaten cancer. But 
apart from waging his per¬ 
sonal campaign against the 
disease over these past horren¬ 
dous 16 months, Charles- 
Jones has been sharing his life 
with a wife who for nearly two 
years has been paralysed. On 
Thursday On the Lina (BBC 2, 
8.25pm) tells the story of 
Gareth and Jessica, sport’s, 
most courageous couple. 

Their lives were linked in 
that time-honoured way — 
love at first sight — at 
Chepstow. That was their first 
meeting; a hurdle race which 
Gareth actually won and in 
which Jessica, then a 19-year- 
old conditional jockey, daugh¬ 
ter of a Tavistock farmer- 
owner-trainer called George 
Turner, followed a distance 
behind. 

Within a couple of years, 
they were married and the 
only ups and downs of life 
were on the National Hunt 
racing tracks. That is, until in 
October almost two years ago. 
Jessica bad a crashing fell at 
Southwell, was taken to hos¬ 
pital and awoke to leant that 
she was paralysed. 

Almost before they had 
restructured their lives to cope 





KEN LAWRENCE'S guide to 
the best in televisedsport in die 
w eek ahead _ 

-with this tragedy, Gareth was 
taken ill. Seven months after 
Jessica’s fell, he organised a 
holiday in Ibiza, did not really 
feel like going, buz “didn't 
wish to spoil the holiday”. So 
he arranged to see the doctor 
on their return. The diagnosis 
was as he feared, cancer. 

It would have been enough 
to destroy some marriages; yet 
somehow these two nursed 
each other, propping each 
other up emotionally and 
physically. “It was a pretty 
terrible time,” Jessica recalls. 
They bad to move home from 
near Lam bourne to Letcorabe 
Regis in Oxfordshire to find a 
house which could accom¬ 
modate Jessica’s wheelchair, 
and “Gareth’s treatment was 
not very nice,” she adds. 

“We cried as little as pos¬ 
sible. It was so bad at times — 
You had to be hard to get 
through it- But we tried to 
smile and be cheerful If we 
weren't, people would not 
have come to see us. Now, 
fingers crossed, everything is 
OK. with Gareth. He has to be 
checked on for another five 
years or so but we think he is 
over iL As for me, I think 
there may have been frac¬ 
tional improvement. I am 
having acupuncture now and I 
am still hoping...” 

Hope for Jessica means 
simply being able to sit on a 
horse once more in her life. 
For Gareth it means being 
able to emulate Bob Cham¬ 
pion and also ride in the 
Grand National: that is the 
next ambition. However emo¬ 
tional the name of today's 
mount, Richard Lionheart. 
nothing can be read into it* “It 
just happens to be owned and 
trained by Jessica's fetber, 
George, down in Tavistock,” 
he laughs. *T won’t mind if I 
finish last 

“Getting aboard will be 
fantastic — a bit like finding 
the pot of gold at the end of the 
rainbow.” But, even as Gareth 
says it, you know that in 
reality it is just the first step' 
towards the foot of that 
rainbow. 


HIGHLIGHTS OF THE WEEK 


TODAY; Ramwnbw you an watering 
tuteetes wte dbabUttos rater than 
cfteabted athletes in the 1990 Special 
Olympics. W wB be anoMr hMrMrarmar 
from Qr j n dat snd in Glasgow (B8C1, 
1230449. 

TOMORROW; Near to quitting for lac* of 
cash. Britain’s Stave Webstar is now in 
sight at Ms fourt h wor ld sidecar chany- 
kinship; the British grand pnx Bt 
Dwtington today should provide another 
victory. BBC and Eunaport haw five 
cover, even though, komcaty, Webster 
wfl be carrying BSB colours; the mtetfte 
station sponsors him. (BBC2 hom 125, 
Eurosport from 1230L * 

MONDAY: Thousands have tried and 
hundreds have died attempting to cfcte 
the north face at the Matterhorn, tn 90 
minutes. Eurosport (12304pm) covers an 
ascent and a descent Gripping stuff. If 
you are without Sky. then take In the hogr- 
fcng hfghSghts from Stockholm of the 
World Equestrian Gamas (BBC2.4pm). 
TUESDAY: The first of two very quat 


days. Best today could be the rupfry ution 
iUgwkpMB featuring Scotland and New 
Zealand. France and Austraia and Eng¬ 
land In ArgeteiM (BSB. 5pm). 
WEDNESDAY; there la dirty business 
underwater — Me cover of the Nations 
Cup water polo m Rome (Euraapart 7pm). 
THURSDAY: India's batsmen ore 
entert ai ning as any; are ttwtr bawriare 
good enough to salvage the Test series, 
howsvm? Iim secondTest Begins at Old 
Treffcwd today. Juigia the buttons be- 
iwaenBBCI and 2 and you can see every 
bail (from 1050am on 2). 

FRIOAY: Can Me* Faldo win tho final golf 
major of theyeart This Is the second day 
of the US KSA ch a m p ions h ip at Shoal 
Creak. BSB hBs exclusive lw cover on an 
four days. Tony Jaddin and Bernard 
Gatiacher convnentata and FakJo tense!! 
adda hote-by-frote analysis. (BSB, 6- 
mkMght). if you are dbhiess, BBC has the 
hn van Oammo athletics mooting (ram 
Brussels 0t 7A0. 


SQUASH RACKETS 

England provide 
all semi-finalists 

From Colin McQuillan in paderborn. west Germany 


WHILE England were celebrat¬ 
ing a guaranteed winner 48 
hours ahead of today’s final of 
the AOK. world junior champ¬ 
ionship, the Kuwaitis and Paki¬ 
stanis had other things to 
occupy their thoughts. 

There are four teenage Ku¬ 
waiti boys conducting them¬ 
selves with splendid 
competitive verve here. The 
youngest, Ahmed Sultan, 

12 , was player of the day ai 
his courageous battle against the 
gangling Jan Dillner, aged 19, of 
Germany. 

On Thursday, while En¬ 
gland's under-19 squad were 
winning all four semi-final 
places. Sultan and his colleagues 
were desperately trying to con¬ 
tact friends and relations back 
home- 

-We must accept their entry 
and remain flexible as to 
participation,” Karl Heinz 
Balner, the championship 
controller, said. 

The International Squash 
Rackets Federation had yes¬ 
terday still not ofTicially re¬ 
ceived the affiliation fees that 
would allow Pakistan to partici¬ 
pate in the team championships 
which stan today. 

Pakistan performed poorly in 


the individual event. Their two 
best players. Zubair Jahan and 
Abdul Rasheed, were among the 
victims of the English assault, 
respectively going down in four 
games to David Campion and 
Simon Parke. 

"It was a great day for 
England,” Jonah Barrington, the 
team coach, said. “I am not sure 
that this is not the best day 
English squash has ever pro¬ 
duced. I have been waiting ten 
years for ibis breakthrough. 
These boys were on my earliest 
junior squads as far back as 
J980.” 

Parke, aged 17, and the top 
seed, resisted a sparkling early 
challenge from Rasheed to reach 
a semi-final against Aiden 
Harrison, an 18-year-old fellow 
York5hireman, who beat the 
leading Australian. Nathan 
Gallagher. Campion, another 
Yorkshireman. who will be 19 
on team finals day, overcame 
mid-match nerves to be?! Jahan 
and face Mark Allen, aged 18. 
from Essex. 

RESULTS: Man 1 * ■JngSaa Qumter-flnata: 
S Parte (Engl bt A Raeteefl (Pakj, 9-2.7- 


spobts service 


COUNTY 

CRICKET 


Scores and repons 

Cali 0898 400736 


RACING 



sftWfc?? 

Commentary 

Call 0898 500123 

Results 

Call 0898 100123 


Calls cost 2Sp per min (heap rate, 
38 p per min other times ioc VAT 


(Eng) bt 2 Jahan (Pakj, 941,1-9, 9-i. 9-1. 

TENNIS 

Bates through 
as Jacques 
takes a look 

JEREMY Bates, the British 
No. l, was watched by Warren 
Jacques, the Davis Cup team 
manager, as he moved into the 
semi-finals of the Northumber¬ 
land Open in Newcastle 

yesterday. 

Bates, the No. 1 seed, beat 
Nigel Russell in straights sets 
and meets Johan Anderson, 
who had a comfortable victory 
over Lee Galway, of New 
Zealand. 

Peter Doohan, of Australia, 
and Slobodan Zivojinovic, ihe 
Yugoslav Davis Cup player, 
meet in the other semi-final. 
RESULTS (BritiSft urtaaj WnadTI: 
otogMc Ouaitw-frnate J Bates W N 
Russel. 6-2, 6-3. J Anderson (Aus) Bt L \ 
Galway [N2], S-1.6-2; P Doohan (AUS) W J ' 
Goodafl. W. 6-1: S Zwojtoovie (Yog) MS 
Cola. 6-4. 64. Women's atogtoa: aenti- 
flnob; A SKnpWn t# C BUmgfram, 7-5,6-7, 
6-ft J Louis & A Ftemljig, £4,4-6,6-4, 


By Graham Rock 

NATIONAL Hunt racing is The human preoccupation 

with the bizarre suggests that 
Devon Loch is likely to re¬ 
main Queen Elizabeth's most 
famous horse. A high-class 
chaser, he will be remembered 
for not winning the 1956 
Grand NationaL Gear on the 
run-in, be collapsed onto his 
belly less than 50 yards from 
Ihe winning post when he and 
Dick Francis had the glittering 
prize within their grasp. 

A generation later it is still 
impossible to identify the 
cause of Devon Loch's extra¬ 
ordinary behaviour. Francis 
has always believed that the 
roar of the Ainlree crowd 
cheering home a Royal winner 
was loud enough to terrify his 
mount. “The calamity which 
overtook us was sudden, ter¬ 
rible and completely without 
warning,” he wrote later. 

Queen Elizabeth received 
the shock with equanimity 
and later wrote to her trainer 
Peter Cazalet: “I am sure that 
you know bow deeply 1 fee! for 
you. I am beginning to learn 
more of the immense amount 
of thought and work that goes 
into the preparation of a horse 
for racing and I can under¬ 
stand a little of the anguish 
you must have felt at such a 
cruel blow. 1 send my heartfelt 
sympathy to you and all in the 
Fairlawne stable. We will not 
be done in by this, and will 
just keep on trying.” 

Queen Elizabeth has not yet 
won a Grand NationaL but in 
the years after Devon Loch, 
she and Cazalet enjoyed sev¬ 
eral seasons of unbroken suc¬ 
cess. Many days bum bright in 
the mind but none more than 
December 9, 1961 when The 
Rip, Double Star and Laffy 
completed a Royal treble in 
just over an hour at Lingfield, 
and provided a memorable 
highlight to Queen Elizabeth's 
annual weekend at Cazalet's 
country estate. 

She was a regular visitor to 
Fairlawne. Not content with 
looking at her own horses, die 
loured round every box, chat¬ 
ted to all the lads, and 
surprised them with her know¬ 
ledge of the form, 
taffy provided another 


hearted; it offers a unique 
blend of hope and heartbreak 
which delivers agony and 
ecstasy in proportions which 
soon drive out all but the 
faithful. 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen 
Mother, has described owner¬ 
ship as 80 per com disappoint¬ 
ment Fortunately for us the 
20 percent elation has ensured 
that she has remained the 
sport's most famous and most 
popular supporter tor more 
than 40 years. 

Stories of her betting are an 
apocryphal tabloid dream, al¬ 
though her welcome first task 
of the day is to read through 
The Sporting Life and she sees 
her horses run whenever of¬ 
ficial duties permit It is a 
relaxation she treasures. The 
early triumphs are part of 
racing legend: Monaveen, her 
first horse, was owned in part¬ 
nership with the then Princess 
Elizabeth and won the inaugu¬ 
ral running of the Queen 
Elizabeth Cup at Hurst Park 
on New Year’s Eve in 1949. 

Mamcou was bought from 
the exors of the late Lord 
Mild may of Flete, the cham¬ 
pion amateur rider who had 
been Queen Elizabeth's racing 
manager, he was drowned 
swimming off the Devon 
coasL Known as the last of the 
Corinthians, and worthy of 
that accolade before usage 
devalued the word to mean 
any sportsman who consented 
to play within the rules, he was 
the inspiration of her pat¬ 
ronage. 

As a five-year-old, Manicou 
put up a remarkable perfor¬ 
mance to beat the future Gold 
Cup winners Silver Fame and 
Knock Hard in the King 
George VI Chase on Boxing 
Day, 1950. Thereafter Man- 
icou’s achievements were cur¬ 
tailed by persistent leg in¬ 
juries, but on that day he gave 
Queen Elizabeth, and the 
Kempton Christinas crowd, a 
scintillating 10 minutes. The 
celebrations were short-lived, 
however, as Monaveen broke 
a leg and had to be put down a 
few days later. 



Team meeting: the Queen Mother talks with jockey Kevin Mooney, trainer Folk* Walwyn and his wife. Cafe 


enduring memory when win¬ 
ning the Ulster Fferp National 
at Downpatrick in 1962, de¬ 
spite crossing the line in 
second place behind the er¬ 
ratic Connkehely, who had 
missed out a fence. 

When the crowd realised 
that Laffy had won, they 
surged forward and mobbed 
the winning owner. Her body¬ 
guard was lost in the melee 
and while Queen Elizabeth 
survived intact, the same 
could not be said of Laffy, who 
looked distinctly ruffled by the 
time the crowd had dispersed 
carrying souvenir hairs from 
his mane and taiL 

The Rip was a particular 
favourite. Bred by Jack Irwin, 
who owned the Red Cat Hotel 
at North Wootton, near San¬ 
dringham, this big, slashing 
chaser often wore blinkers, but 


none doubted his courage. He 
won 13 races. 

Inch Arran's victory in the 
Topham Trophy of 1973 was 
the 250th sent out by Peter 
Cazalet for Queen Elizabeth, 
and his last He died the 
following May and the 17 
Royal horses were transferred 
to Fulke Walwyn at Lam- 
boum. 

The scale of the operation 
tvas reduced, but the winners 
kepi coming, including Tarn- 
muz in the Schweppes Gold 
Trophy and Special Cargo by a 
short head in one of the 
greatest Whitbread Gold 
Cups. On another tingling 
afternoon at Sandown four 
years ago. Insular, trained by 
Ian Balding, won the Imperial 
Cup while Special Cargo, to¬ 
gether with The Argonaut, 
completed a treble in Queen 


Elizabeth's blue, buff and 
black colours. 

Fulke Walwyn recently re¬ 
tired and the licence has been 
taken over by his wife. Caift, 
but the Royal string remains 
at Saxon House and Queen 
Elizabeth will start the new 
jump season with seven 
horses, including the promis¬ 
ing Dudley. 

The Argonaut's win at 
Sandown this spring was her 
380th jumping success, and 
Queen Elizabeth has also 
owned two winners on the flat 
including Bali Ha'i IIL a 
surprise gift from Sir Ernest 
Davis. In 1959, this tough 
stayer took the Queen Alexan¬ 
dra Stakes at Royal Ascot. 

Queen Elizabeth has always 
preferred the informality of 
jump racing. Sandown and 
Newbury are, perhaps, her 


Carson bounces back after ban 


By Michael Seely 
Racing Correspondent 

WILLIE Carson certainly had a 
taste of die slings and arrows of 
outrageous fortune during 
another sweltering afternoon at 
glorious Goodwood yesterday. 

In the space of three races, the 
jockey of the moment earned a 
four-day suspension for careless 
riding, won the day’s big race on 
Kawtuban and then finished a 
well-beaten third on Hateel, the 
favourite in the Schraders 
Glorious Stakes. 

However, on balance the bus¬ 
tling 47-year-old Scot had a 
successful afternoon as a later 
success on Alnab for John 
Dunlop In the Chichester Stakes 
saw Carson finish the day with* 
six winners at the meeting, two 
ahead of John Reid in the fight 
for the Ritz Club Trophy, 
awarded to the leading rider at 
the meeting. 

“It’s all part of the ups and 
downs of the game.” said Car- 
son, resignedly, after bis mount. 
Jimmy Baroie. had been dis¬ 
qualified and placed last of the 
four runners in the Molecomb 
Stakes. "They said that I made 
little attempt to stop the horse 
hanging. But I’ve done worse 
things and got away with it, so 
I’ve no complaint." 

The four-runner group three 
five-furlong sprint for iwo-year- 
olds certainly produced a thrill¬ 
ing affair. Jimmy Barnie 
mastered the early leader. It’s 
All Academic, a furlong from 
home and then held on to his 
lead to beat the Tast-finishing 
Poets Cove by half a length with 
It’s All Academic H* lengths 
away third, only a short head in 
front of Seductress. 

After a lengthy stewards' en¬ 
quiry Jimmy Barnie was de¬ 
moted to last place and the race 
therefore awarded to Poets 
Cbve. Carson was stood down 
for four days for careless riding, 
the sentence to run from August 
12 to 15 inclusive. 

Explaining their decision, 
Peter Sleveney, the senior stew¬ 
ard's secretary, said: “There 

were two separate incidents. In 
the first, Jimmy Barnie inter¬ 
fered first with Seductress and 
then with It’s All Academic In 
the second incident. Poets Cove 
marginally brushed It’s All Aca¬ 
demic when coming through to 
take second place. But it was 
considered that this interference 


HUGH RGUnjEDGE 



The Mazon-Caced Jimmy Barnie was demoted after beating eventual winner. Poets Cove (right), in the Moteoomb Stakes 


had been accidental and had not 
improved Poets Cove's placing. 

Watching the video recording 
of the race, it was obvious that 
one of the reasons for the ban 
had been that Carson, who bad 
been on the outside of the field 
on Jimmy Sarnie, had been 
riding with his whip in bis right 
hand and bad made no attempt 
Vo transfer it. 

The stewards also interviewed 
Reid and asked the rider of 
Poets Cove to explain his use of 
the whip in the dosing stages. 
However, the jockey said that 
the bad been told to handle 
Poets Cove vigorously, as the 
two-year-old was lazy. He also 
added that Poets Cove had 
responded to the use of the 
whip. The stewards accepted 
this explanation. 

Although Poets Cove’s 


connections may have been 
surprised by the promotion to 
first place, the victoiy had been 
well anticipated in the market, 
the price of the eariy-season 
conqueror of Mac’s Imp having 
been forced from 10-1 to 11 - 2 . 

Yesterday's winner's dam was 
originally bought for 500 guin¬ 
eas at the Ascot sales as a polo 
pony for Charles Cruden, who 
owns the winner in partnership 
with bis father Peter, the polo 
manager at Cowdray Park. 

Carson's win on Kawtuban, 
who was blinkered for the first 
time in the Leslie and Godwin 
Spitfire Stakes, was an extraor¬ 
dinary affair to watch. 

The race looked all over when 
Pat Eddery persuaded Aromatic 
to quicken and go dear entering 
the last furlong, but Kawtuban 
kept plugging away and got up 


dose home to win by a neck. 
Baylis finished think three 
lengths further away in from of 
Red Toto. 

Roger Chariton trained die 
winner for Sheikh Hamdan AJ- 
Maktoum. “He’s very lazy and 
we put blinkers on him today to 
help him to concentrate,” said 
the trainer. 

Charlton also had news of his 
classic colts. “Quest For Fame 
starts strong work this weekend. 
We probably won’t get him 
ready in time for the Great 
Voltigeur at York. Sanglamore 
is still bit shouidery- He’s been 
swimming at Man ton. Whether 
he runs in either the Great 
Voltigeur or the International 
depends entirely on the ground 
as he needs some give in iL 
Deploy is being trained for the 
St Leger. It he doesn't run in the 


Great Voltigeur, he’ll go to 
Newbury for the Geoffrey Freer. 

Hated, Carson’s mount in the 
Glorious Stakes, was clearly 
feeling the effects of his busy 
and successful season and never 
looked like getting in the race as 
Lanfranco Dettori drove the 
Luca Cumani-trained Hajade 
home 2 Vi lengths clear of 
Spinning. 

Steve Cauthen had his only 
winner of the afernoon when 
driving Southern Sky to the 
front dose home to win a 
desperate affair for the Rich¬ 
mond Towers Diamond Jubilee 
Stakes. And Guy Harwood had 
his first success at the local 
meeting when Ray Cochrane 
and Polish Patriot made no 
mistake about justifying 7-4 
favouritism in the concUiding 
Selsey Maiden Stakes. 


Results from yesterday’s afternoon meetings 

Goodwood 


- favourite racecourses. She 
used to travel to Newbury by 
train, and on more .than one 
occasion the Royal party spent 
the journey rocking with 
laughter at the jokes of Cap¬ 
tain Charles Moore, manager 
of the Royal studs. 

IfThe Rip was her fevourite 
horse. Game Spirit came a 
close second. A bold, free- 
running steeplechaser; he won 
21 ofbis4? races but collapsed 
. and died after competing in 
thejGeoflrey Gtibey Chase at 
Newbury in 1977. 

The post mortem revealed 
not only a haemorrhage of the 
lungs which had bnuight 
about his demise, bat dear 
evidence of internal Weeding 
during previous races. 

Game Spirit; an appropriate 
name for the horse but the 
personification of its owner. 

Boutin colt 
to outpace 
British duo 

From Our French Racing 
Correspondent, Deauville 

MACHIAVELLIAN can daw- 
back some of the reputation 
dented in the English and Irish 
Guineas by outspeedmg the 
British raiders. Dead Certain 
and Rock City, in the group two 
Prix Maurice de Gheest at 
Deauville tomorrow. 

While Machiavellian stays a 
mile perfectly wdl. it is Uhdy 
that Francois Boutin's colt will 
be able to utilise his impressive 
speed belter over tomorrow’s 
trip of 6& furlong?. 

In a five-horse Hne-up, in 
which tactics must play a njajor 
role. Machiavellian feces the 
talented duo of Rock City and 
Dead Certain. 

Rock City (Willie Carson) has 
been a model of consistency this 
season and can be counted 
somewhat unlucky when beaten 
less than a length Into third 
place in the July Cup at New¬ 
market last month, in which 
Dead Certain was nearly 11 
lengths back in sixth. 

However, not only is Dead 
Certain 51b better off this time 
with Rode City, but David 
Elsworth's filly is likely to have 
much more opport un ity to settle 

early on here. 

With Dominique Boeuf-tak¬ 
ing over on Pole Position, this 
leaves Cash Asmussen free to - 
renew his partnership ou Dead 
Certain, on whom he won last 
October’s group one Cbevdey 
Park Stakes at Newmarket 
Alec Stewart and Michael 
Roberts look to have an ex¬ 
cellent prospects of A! Maheb 
taking the earlier Prix 
KjMgoriay, an extremely weak- 
looking group two race in which 
lan Balding’s St Leger Italiano 
winner Parting Moment (Bruce 
Raymond) is chosen for the 
forecast. British interests are 
also represented by Beauchamp 
Express (Willie Carson). 

. Ai Maheb was tremendously 
impressive when landing a gam¬ 
ble m last month’s Nonhumber- 
fend Plate, beating Dance 
Spectrum by 1 % lengths. 

Racing next week 

"ffi&Rlpon. 

TUESDAY: Brighton. Redcar. tNott- 


Oaten - - 900 c to firm, sir, nrm, mo 
Z30MOLECCMB STAKES (Group Ilf: 2- 
Y-O: £10,194: 50 

POETS COVE b c Bay Express - Min 
MUtte (PCrtfoW) 8-12 jReio ( 11 - 2 ) i. 
If* All Academic b 1 Mazaad - Prmcoss 
Of Nasnua (Academy Leasing urn 6-7 
Pat Eddery (5-S lavj 2 . 

Sortocp*** Ch 1 Known Fan - Much Too 

FbsXyfJ Q/oetham) 8-10 WR SwtnOum 

P-4) 3. 

ALSO RAM: 7 Jimmy Sarnie (4th). 4 ran. 
H 1 Sit. an M. W Cart# at Eosom. Tow 
aa.SQ. of: ea-aa. csf-. £ 1123 . a«w 
stewards enquiry Jimmy Sarnie, wfio 
finished flraL was tiaquawtel S7 JOsec 

MO (1m 8 ) 1 . KAWTUBAN <W Careon. 
7-lk 2. Afwaaflc (Pat Eddery. 4-1): 3. 

_..latl-Dettori. 7-1>. ALSO RAM 10-n 

fay fiM Torn (4th). 25 Petipa ( 6 ft). Stella 
Bianca (5ft). Uiefels Lady, 33 Royal 
V«w. fl raft Hd 31.2ViL 61. ULR Chariton 
at eocWiampton. Tow: £7.50; E1J30. 
£1.90. £1*1. OF: ElSZQ. CSF: £31.68. 
Trtcsst £180.69. &rrtn 8.12 mc. 

XA9 (im 41)1. HAJAO£ (L Dettori. & 4 L' 
8 , Spinning (S O'Gorman. 9-a ; 3 . Ka&nt 
(W Carson. 11-8 lav). ALSO RAN: 16 
TtmlCB Esjjlon(4inV 4 ran. 2 V.I, isi, za. L 
Cwrwni at Newmarket. Tots: £2.30. DF: 

£4.80. CSF; £7.91. 2 mm 31 aasee. 

4.15(71) 1. SOUTHERN SKY (S Coutten, 
3-1 fev). 2. Boyaflaa (T wuflams, 7-g; 3 . 
Eufafink The Lad (W Carson. 7-iu ALSO 
RAN; 4 Scarier Hooy (Hti). 9-2 MfeuwSA 
tSft), 8 Lattbeonesmooum (4ft). 6 ran. li, 
II, nie, KL 21, D Ebwonn » Wfritsl 
Tote: £3. B0; £220, £2.09. OF: E 6 . 0 C. I 
£IZ48.1 min 2721386. 



Tote: 

CSF: 


tewt.ia.GHarwoodat_ 

£2.60; £1.60. £340. OF: £16. 

£14.89. intin 11.1758c. 

Jackpot £14,438.10. Placepot £671.2a 


Tairsk 


Dettori: success at 
Goodwood with Hajade 

4,45 f7n 1. ALNAAB (W Canon. 11-10 

n Z Fly Away Soon (T Quirm, 10O-3O): 

attar Figure (B Bouse. 12-1,. ALSO 
RAN; 9-2 Wa&m (5m). 12 Lord Otteron 
t«m>. 20 Kalmn. 33 Design* Stubbte 
(8m). 7 ran. 2V, II. Kl. tt. 61 . J Durtop at 
Arunooi. Tots: E2.10; £1.70. EZS0. Dr; 
&a JO. CSF: E4.9S. 1 mm Z7.43S0C. 

5.20 (50 1. POLISH PATRIOT (Ft 
Coclrarw. 7-4 (av): 2. Samara! GeU (j 
Vfflffims. 9-11; 3. MujeazH (IN R SwteUum. 
1MI. ALSO RAN. 7 Stedad (4Bi|. B 
Colombian GoW («ij. 66 cowngata. 
ToUTHwacuW (6ft). 7 ran. iL 1 hL 41, (food 


flctoli: ten 
2.15(501.1 _ 

Harry Hardman ( . 

7 ran. NR. Dasring I __..._ 

VWWjfrW- TOte; £420; CZ20. £2.10. DF: 
£6.00. CSF: £10.38. Trtcast £2231. 

24» <1m 41) 1. Cora Lfly (Nm TWOw. 
1 O -11 fart: 3. Tup Hoafy (12*1): 3. Lucky 
S?™* 3 £* 2 i. 5 W. 2Vil 3L N TmMer. Tote: 
£1.9ft £1 JO. £3.40. OF: £5.40. CSF: 
£9.79. Bougni in S^OOgns. 

W0 fri) 1 . Attatek Park (ttean 
McJtoown. 7-2 lav); 2, Fyas £12-1): 3. 
Swiss Baa my (iD-ij. 16 ran. 41. M. T 
BteoaTKs: £J.7D, SLQ0, £230. £3.80. 
OF: £20.00. CSF; £49.37. 

,“S 1 ■ &&V Ster |S Wetater. 1ft. 
1): Z ftissyFoet omr 5, BsSa Smrtte 
rii- 21 . Ever RecUess 6-5 lav. 6 ran. NR: 
Qraai Cftaddfogrton, Highland Rowan*, a, 
Jfato'Slotf: El 2.40: £2^0. £1.60, 
OF: £1500. CSF: £36.06. Tricast £15431. 
„ ffS (tmi 1. Bsnuw ottoffl (A Oottsn. 

S 9-* tavl: 2, Nsarroe {£lfc ft Hickory Wtod 
y-SraftJfc'JJt. 4 j O’HM. Tote: £2.70; 
■70, £2.50. DF. £15.40. CSF; £16.13. 
Alter a atevrards' enquiry, result stood. 

4J55t2ml1,(6gitSoMtad(G Carter, 6-4 
lavj; Z. lie 0* Roma (4-lk 3. Sonant 
Mcnsich 111-4). q ran. 2x»l, sh hd- J 
DF: 

Pfacopct £9640. 


Bangor 

Oetog; good to Arm 

3.50 an 4f chi 1, Stofitag Rome (P 
Vartflfl. 33-1); 2, Doranlcua 14-1). Mister 
Featten 4-6 Uv. 5 ran. NR; Ctiskts Casta. 
71. J O'Shea. Tote: C23.Q0-. aw, 

DF: E2IL40. CSF: £134.90. Oriy two 

teoted. 

4jzq am hdtol 1 , Palm Lad m _ 

4-U Z Royal Hum (33-1); 3, Smoke 


*£*g*jF:*n.cmwuA.o+ 

****** 


Qoa dto y Venture. «. a, 20, dm, 41. j 

53L£2£••*?«??*. Oowa 


BSRBUSS^-*—- 

jjjgjock, Piumpton, Markrt 
Haydock 

v3"^i **8tor, t’L-inoftflW Park. 

tSoiilhwBll, t Windsor, 

f inbokr. 




£9.54. ---MTOuroHi: 

Print favours Indigo 


THE deceptive angle of the 
finish at Thiisk caught plenty of 
racegoers out at the end of the 
Lewis Geipel Memorial Chall¬ 
enge Cup Nursery yesterday. 

Francis Lee, the trainer of Sir 
Harry Hardman, was convinced 
his runner bad got up in the 
dying strides to deny Indigo. 

But the print showed Indigo 
in front by as much as a head, 
with the third, Gorinsky, a short 
head behind the two top 
weights. 

Indigo’s owner, local steward auc « irvn — , ,-^ucui 

David Brothenou, was another bSt |3?J? ,kle !' e i'™ually 
spectator unsure of the out- m for S ’X*> 


A drop back to selling com- 
jjy ? r ? ved for Cora Lily 

J° n! ] needed to be ridden 
out hands and heels to justify 

r53^ 0n w fevourilism in the 
Golden Fleece Selling Stakes. 

M N Jp» Tinkler said 

{£* *5 “ »*»dy handicapped 
Jhai riie has to be confined to 
claiming and selling company 
Not surprisingly, there to* 



.WLtlAM liiLl. LEEDS LSI 

"’-v no ,l: V* 3 ;;! ue.' inm Chen 


> 



























i:,[Nes 


orv 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 





v -1 -->!♦ 

*- vwll 
! : ' ''■3 

- 4- U W 

:jo 







(MiaiAELpinLui»$) 
MOON Cactus has an ex 
^™^ ofwi ?™sih e 


>THIRSK 


^>urse rad distance by giviog ; year-old even though stem 
olband a comfort- opposition can be expected 
able bearing, -Vyv . ••• from those talented older 

Game-Plan later finished fillies Alcando and StarieL 


after an appalling run in the 
Oaks. Good fiJIy that she 
looked at Newbury before 

Vodafnn* xtL,~" "‘“““S me , ~’*T“ VT .VT* uaisnea uiucsfUKuaio ana warier. that, she has still to show that, 
GoodwnnritJ^ 5811 ^ lakes at f^nd to Salsabil in the Oaks Atcando had been placed in she is in the same class as 
taJent^°« l ^S ay now1bather the ftmiy similar races which were also Moon Cactus. 

iJanJr? JJf ble companion E”?. m Ireland. At contested byooltsat Sandown On the day that the Oueen 

as « n - r 1 Ayr tto ^ while cS«.« her nT- 

^spe snapped to make the Starlet made lie usefu! three, tielh birthday, a royal winner 

When then hmh S SearT ^^ ,ta * Ctarmer look would be singularly appro- 

M , boti contested - «rowss r **ohad herself ton wry ordinary indeed at prfaie. In addition to Starlet. 

fheQueen’s colours will also 

beaten^ -u?° n i **as receiving weight. As Starlet has been tested in be carried at Goodwood by 

Rafhnwhn k . ,en 8 t .* ls by Yesterday, George Robin* foal to Sbarnood, this could Unknown Quantity in the 
c? ? rI,er w <m son,our Newmarket Comes- well be her swansong as for as Racal Chesterfield Cup. 
at *? ZS r >etil . Stakes POndent added his weight to racing is concerned. Judged on But as there is nothing 

Oabc^j ai5d tbe that Moon Cactus is .the way that she burst clear of between Unknown Quantity 

HnwnrTTr *u ■ ‘ t tter *** appeared in her rivals in the straight at and Song of Sixpence on form 

iuS*7V « a form france, by reporting that she Kempton, Steve Cauthen will (Unknown Quantity is now 
n Game Plan and bas gone consistently better not be able to afford to give 31 b better off for that i 1 .*- 

*~‘L 8m s Baroness that lends man Rafiia in their recent Starlet too much rope length beating at Ascot last 

*** view that workoutst °8ethcr. When Mamaluna won the Saturday). I must look elsc- 

herwTrJT “o 1 seen at- • ■ So, Moon Cactus looks corresponding race last year, where f0T the ! ! kel y winner 
the seasnn - ier P 015 ®^ 1 ® pick up the winning the opposition was not as stiff to parador ID particular. 

Lime Stair thread on a course where she as it is now. For Kanajana this He was considered unlucky 

•—- ataKCS over today’s was also successful as a two- represents a hard comeback not to beat the subsequent 


Cactus 


not to beat the subsequent 


Magnet Cup winner Eradicate 
in the Zetland Gold Cup at 
Redcar in May. 

From Newmarket there is a 1 
strong tip that True Dividend. I 
from Luca Cumani's stable, 
will be a thorn in everybody's 
side. 

At Newmarket, I like the 
look of that evergreen jockey 
Bruce Raymond’s chance of 
landing a treble on Shoot Fore 
(2.45), Joli’s Princess (4.20) 
and Self Expression (4.20). 

No matter what happens at 
Goodwood, there should be a 
royal celebration, not inappro¬ 
priately at Windsor's evening 
meeting, where Ouce Upon A 
Time (7.20) and Full Or¬ 
chestra (8.20) are taken to give 
the Queen a double. 

Blinkered first time 

OOODWOOO: 3.10 Atcando. TTSRSK: 
SSS Express Account. NEWMARKET: 
2.45 BustahL WWQSOR: ass CarftoW 
Lad, Whtanr Led. 


^ Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.00 Majlood. 

• • 2.30 Parador. 

310 MOON CACTUS (nap). = 

3.45 Almasa. 

4.15 Be Fresh. 

4.45 Halston Prince. 

5.20 Gadabout. 


- . Vi "i rfri'.A 


By Our Newmarket 

Correspondent 
2.00 MAJLOOD (nap). 
.230 True Dividend. 

3.10 Moon- Cactus.' 

3.45 Sir Bancroft. 

4.15 Be FreSh. 

4.45 Thakib. 

530 Jamin. 


By Michael Seely 

2.30 TRUE DIVIDEND (napX 3.10 Moon Cactus. 

The Times Private Handicapped top rating 3.10 STARLET. 

Guide to our in-line racecaid 

103(1?) 0-0432 OOOOTHIS74 (CB&FF&JS) (Mrs DRotafcacn)BHeB 9-100_ BW 


ScrawlJ5S7 5 b !f d u ^- «*atance winner. BF-beaten favourite in 

B^broiiwdo^r*g"* -<*** on which Korea has won 

D- SBiSr.“ft B (f-ftnn, good to firm. hard. Q - good. 

TTSL Da X? S - soft, good to soft, deary). Owner in 

yT^or ^ . braokets. Tralnar. Age and Weight Rider 

&^a^ nCe ‘ ™ ^ Pri,,aW 

Going: good to firm, straight course; firm, round 
Draw: 5f-1m, high numbers best 

2*0 VOOAPAGE MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £6.420; 6f) (B runners) 


1« (0 AMTWE(CkiBrtatRacing)PIMMiSO_1!_- • -• : nri- — 

0 BALAATiHamdan AHiaiaoim) p wwmi on W Canon — 

® «^WSALT(UdyChalaaa)JDwlop90--RCocbme — 

22* (1) WAItT OF DMOOCSS (P Msflon) I BaUng 9-0___ SCaettan — 

MAAOOO(MaMoumAtMakioum)MStoutaBO_ WRSwMnm — 

1« W FETRACO <H Haifonl L QaM B JI _ MCadWa — 

W W SMASH nAMCC(J SrtAh) D Bswortti 90. .. ■' JWDm — 

10 ®£> BOMA RABRI AMaMh«Ma«w«lM).iiyTyilA r FMEddBiy — 

aneSSKSlSnS?' 18-Mt,4 “ 1 He@t Oatttwsa. 5-1 May Sa«. BoM AiabaBa. 12-1 Air Tm. 

TMStTIOtqOL MWR Swinbum (Evans M Stouta 7 tan 


STas a lUHrte. AhatWater to Faadaaa Native, Mi 
2T wknar and Native Cbannac 


CaSlY SALT (May 6) by sprinter Misweki out of an 
unraoad halfoiatM-to ERstcne Fade by Sea BW D. 
KaH-brottwr to lour winrnts inducing ttafean DWfcy 


3rd Sea’s VUtey. successful in B races m France 
and Italy ol which 4 were Listed. Cost lRSZJMCVs 
aa a ysarfng. *ART OF DARKNESS (Fabll)!by 


Gfct Of Gold and tatfoal o( Land Of ivwy. Is fei the 
DawtmtSiMasr 

MAJL0OD (Mar 13} by Danzig out Of Qui Royalty, a 
very useful daugfitBr at Native Royalty who vton 5 
raoas in tha Statas at uptoa mBa. A bretar » smart 
JuvenieW winner CM rawzfa and halHrother to the 
top dess BflJdiaroff. 5Mm winner as aJuvsnSe 
fncftMXng group I company- Cost t2.10Q.000 as a 


udtfie Bafean DOAy Including group I company. Cost 12.100,000 aa a 
9 races m France ye srt ng an d* W in Bit lidiia Park and Pewhurst 
Cost iFt32JW0ois htate? 


NnSaMcMon 


230 BACAL CHESTERFIELD CUP (HancScap; £22^15: 1m 2f) (7 r.‘pnp- 
runners) 

201 (3) 10-MAO MOMAST8tY21(CO^,^(JAshartwini)MrsLPfggott4-9-10.___jRaid 

202 (2). 119002 UNKNOWNDUARTTTY7pwm(1hsODaan)WHBBtSigB-fiasa548- WCanoe 

-203 m MOW ABIOLIsainiShPOppmMBap^lM^SML--- OCartar 

204 (n 31SO-12 PAltAOOft SB fDJIFJF) £A Spaafenan) O Harwood 4-99_ RCecMana 

205 A 4ST0H B0HaflFaDCPEHCETpXFA9(PMMbnDWA**g*»«>-~—~ ICWMa 

208 p) 54W01 DWEiWgl02*(DJP)tNonhRMgaFam01.Cuniani 4 9 a - LDatknl 


207 49 4M308 F8Kinr7nFA<UrsAlWBmiaa|irAhabwst4frLV.-MEddaiy •■> 

KTIlftM UnknownQuanSty.7-2Paaoor.4-l 3onflOf3hp«w,W TnieDMdand.7-1 Jabol. 10-1 
Urmenrir ITiTfTnn . • .T. 

tMfc PEU0BU8 4-*H> B Roua»(12-1)W JarvlBlOran 

CADU prtfM |C JEHOL oomfan rt Sy LoMOetjKkM*4tA»r<Mia.finM.TmiEtHVIt»D 
runnre beet Jaftnuriqus &laz lost hM maiden safes with a Iz Tdafaat ol Marine 

(Ogonilm 21, pood to Wmj. Ovar In a 5-ninaer apprentice reoa at 8rfc*iton(im 

PARADOR beat Ateaoa bovar « In a UMuawr 21. fira ^; tort m ade el to bsu M S bi a 9- 
handicap at Doncuar Jlih 21 50yd) ako cSd not runne r handicap et Redcw (tm 21. Arm). 
have a dear ran whan *1 2nd to Bsdkate to the FIRE TOP 9ttT3rd otioio Siartat jn aflatad ra ce at 
Zadend Gold Clip at Redcar (im 2f, Sim). - Kempton pm 2 f. good) with MONASTOV (6fe 
SONS OF SIXPEMCE oompieted a quick handeap off)5»i W> and JB»L Mbworee ffl mv: 

double whan besting UMWOWW aGSimr (3b SSf™ (1m 2,1 

better oA INI at Asoot pm 21. good to Rvm> w» S«Xl) whh UfQQloW H QUAN TITY nth. 

FBtE TOP P0*> badar off) 17JU80U previously beat SMactkm: SONG OF SIXPENCE 


1173U 8m; previously beat I Safactton: SONS OF SIXPENCE 


■mm p sw* K m&i 




Selections 


By Mandarin 

2.15 Mystiko. 

2.45 Shom Fore.. . 
330 Tour EiffeL 

3.50 Smart Magician. 
4.20 Joli’s Princess 

4.50 SeiFExpression. 
530 Lots Of Luck. 


By OurNewniarkct 
Correspondent 
2.15 Mystiko. 

2.45 Stent Fore. 

330 Tour Eiffel. 

3.50 Sman Magician. 
430 Joli’s Princess. 

4.50 Le UngoL 
5.20 Naz m i ah . 


_ Michael Seely’s selection: 3.50 Smart Magician. 

Going: good to firm Draw: no advantage SIS 

2.15 EBF FEDERATION OF BRITISH RACING CUSS MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,722: 
6f) (11 runners) 

1 im BAHBARV REEF (R Paraon^ G Eden 90 —i—■ RSMabOBom — 

2 (4) BEACH PATROL (Xennet VMsy T7>orouBhtxed8)W Jams 90- MTMbatt '— 

3 (3) BQWPEH SOT (T Foreman) H CMaghan 90. _ _ ~ - W Newwa — 

4 (5) - . 2 Mysram2S(TMOowwt^BB8*ertw«*)CBrt»am90--*” 

s m 3 aUHSUSnm*(BO(CS1GW3rge>HCeci90_--— - Pamutav 96 

6 nil SURREY RAC94Q (Hestvlew Lid Surrey Radng) G L»vl* 90———: —HOay — 

7 (8) THATCHA*H>SOLD(XTSB Wfoltf)JSutcStte9-0——^-—- BWhUworth — 

8 m TDFSHEREHCfSheA* Ahmad AJ-MaWOum)MJarwa 9-0- BR f^ nond ~ 

g m 4 YIOIFHALL 14Mohammad)MStoMa90— -- KDartay IS 

to fin AHJOOtlf TWES (F Kafc) N Magtan 99- 1 — 

n '(2) 8AAFEIffi(J R Leisure LttflJ.Sutc«HB 8-9--- HWJgttaoi — 

BETTIWfe 94 Myshto. 11-4 Son Sorter. 4-1 Wolf HaB. 8-1 Beach Patrol. 8-1 Top Shareek. 12-1 Bowden 
Bay. 14-1 others. 

1SS0: LAND AFAR 90 M HBa (40-1) W Jarvis 6 ran 

iA5 FOREST GROUP CLAIMING STAKES (3-Y-O: £4,175:7f) (21 runners ^ 

. mmm nmn-miff H*oni N CafcKjhar 9-7-—- B Haywood 94 


1 nO) 40BW0 f»WOTB>RE»<F/h<PB«q!!>><Ca»aghan97^- 

2 m2 444301 SAW HER SMCETPT QF) (Mrs E P»poltfl) H Bom B-M ——— 

3 <41 OSS100 O^P»®«UM2S(BJ^(MrsJn^M^J«rwohe-11_- 

4 (I) 636010 WIPHWE JOE 12(F)(Mre W LesvfajgUyteS-11- 

s i2v 00- MajfOLAI 20 S (Mrs EHolmesIGBaWng 8-11—-- 

6 (61 644302 AUCAHTE14 (Mrs R Slrifttl) PalMtadwC 98- 

7 ft) ^ RBEQOLD2^ (O - 

8 (17) 0044 TARDA 11 (Laty Ourbw^ G PrbchertlGordon »-B- 

g ( /bv os TBB81 r(B Haggas)WHagga#90--- 

]? ra 00-0400 MEXICAN VWOW IS TO (DMOOtelMriLHMOftM—"^ 
« is! ^55 FOXTTOT OSCAR 90 (F) (Foxtrot ReMatJann) J T ofcr B4 - 

13 S3 **£ f »««7 - 

« SS 00 MNK BUBBLES H (Mre B CaMell? R GuW 7-12--— 


_ A TUckar (7) 84 

_ pantEddwy 79 

_ M Hunt (7) — 

_ GBmdwel 87 

_ N Day 62 

_ W Hood 98 

_ JLowe 94 

_ m wg» - 

_ A Han 78 

_ WNewnae 83 

_ ACM 64 

_ C Nutter 91 

_ AMcOtaoe 91 

_ N Adame 89 

. DIMM(5) Si 

_R Mb 94 

_ BCmaalay — 

N Oenaiera e 78 
_ AMackay 98 


15 am.«A^R 14(0)<l*e J Peare)GBten-:- N OeHtenn O 78 

o? Iik! 903004 L/UTTTI?PAZ i re^ BlBl 1 mtMHollHC>t *^^^ w<lltaull, * onW? ~^— AMacAay 98 

1KU “ IT «“'' M ' a ”“ lw '- 1M Sanl 

_ _ 

*20 red MOUNTAIN COFFEE CUP (Amateurs: £3,720: Im 40 (10 

runnecs) 

i J! 1 - M Aiiytaga B 99 

a m 09410 W^WTfflTHEWWDlAfFffPMeaofOtOaictngS-tO-te- OareBaMag 97 

5 [2 OSHAVA24(F)(SheMiMohammad)B«a9-109-- Meate eJwteer .9* 

IS a WOUVMK 86 SaRNrew) M Tre«(*« 3-1M-MBmd|S) — 

* g raSi H Oewn} G Prftchgd-Gordon 3-100.. R Priteha ri-Oord oo 96 

S W ■”» Mfetfiereloo-Godtey3-190-SEMa(5» 77 

3.1 Oshewa. 5-1 West W»TheWnd.7-1 Bodge. IM S»Dynasty. 1*-1 

jafgri. 20-1 others. 1 ^ CT Jfl<M ; A ma L s-1P9MrsGJinfc(9-1)M^rvlsai«i 

form focus iTor^ 

(tra « 40yd. good tp^mg. ■ q* yg-n KiraRnn handbag pm SI, good to «m). 

westWTH T«E ShOMORSiatobeaMniatoC^SatMw<martta»(im 

teeiSvbisvhonarep ff: __ • 

S T‘ST'* .. 

Course speciausts 


OSHAWA VMS oRan outobaatNatirayB by e neck 
in a Baft maldan pm 2 f 5(^0, nm^prevkHOly ran 
GadMxwt to a neck a sandown pm 2f. good to 


flmg. bodqe was a 2 t aid 

HanSun hendtato pm SI; 
OMORSIM beatan in toC 
40.. 

ITaiarUmr 06HAWA 


to mm). 

at Newmarket (Im 


TRAINERS_ 

HCeca |A 327 17.7 MRt&erts 

MSbmo S . 3£9 17^ A Mama 

LCumani 3 ^9 1S8 Paul Eddery 

j Pearce 73 1S.1 MWgfwm : 

J?52£“!S- SO. *» 12-7 F>%qna«are) 

GWWSOd (NatiKb^ag bft night* rwtui^ 


JOCKEYS 

Wren 

38 

40* 

• ■ • - 7 •• 

28 

. It • 


Ridas Par cam 
344 11.3 

368 103 

67 IM 

32* &6 

139 AS 


3.10 VODAFONE NASSAU STAKES (Group II: ffflies: 254,07ft Im 2f) (6 f _ RRni 'S 
runners) \^-r*fY 1 J 

am p) 6TOS62 ALCANDO 21 (BAG^) (N Cowan) C Janes e-9-1-T Quinn 91 

382 ( 2 ) 42140-0 MAIIAUMA S3 (CO^tLS) |A Chnstodouiou) Q Harwood 4-9-1- R Cochmne so 

303 m 4/4310-0 SHYDUSHKA 38 (ftF) (Mrs C Cottns) H Cecil 49-1_W Careen 83 

304 ( 8 ) S-OOTfl STARLET 38 P^.G) (The Queen) W Haaongs-Ssss 4-9-1_Pat Eddery a 69 

305 110 KARTAJANA 56 (U^.O/ (Aga Khan) M Stouta 300-W R Swintmm 61 

386 (5) 2119-12 MOON CACTUS SS (CD^) (SheAh Mohammed) H Cedi 30-6_ S Cauthen 94 

BETTING; 94 Moon Camus. 5-2 Starlet. 5-1 Kanajana. 6-1 Aicando. Mamaluna, 10-1 Shyoushke. 

1989: MAMALUNA 3-90 G Starkey (9-1) G Harwood 5 ran 

FORM FOCUS AUCAMDO ran vnR i race at Kempton pm tf. good) with 8 HYOUSHKA 
rwn "' rvWUQ amen a 2nd o! 7 to I (3a better otfl 8 > back in 7iOARTAJANA success- 
Husyan in a group M at Ayr pm 2f, good). The ful « Lecastar (im 2f, good to Irm) and Newourv 


ground may be loo linn (or her. 

MAMALUNA, successful In mts race Iasi year by i *1 
troro Lady Steptey (nrm). ran weA below term on 
reappearance irtgrou) l event at CapanneUa Pm 21. 
soft) finishing 27fct6th at 9 to Tteserend. 
STARLET recorded her fourth success of the sea- 


(tm 21 . good) on the latter course beating Katslna in 
a 5-runner listed event latest ran deplorably when 
42llas*ol Bio SatsabUtn me Oaks at Epsom tim 41. 
good to soft). 

MOON CACTUS 2nd to Rafha in the French Oaks at 
ChantSy (Im 2 f). 


2) 4.15 TURF CLUB CLAIMING STAKES (£6,056:6f) (7 runners) 

— SOI (4) 51100-0 BE FRESH 43 (D£Q (Dr M BoHa) L Cumant 4-9-6-L Dettori 91 

— 502 (3) 104068 GREBI DOLLAR4(CD^.G)(B Azemocdah) E Wheetar 7-9-3_ SDawaao 61 

— 503 (S) 310020 PROHBITKM 4 1f3Djr/kfS) (J Brown) J Barry 3-9-13-W Canon 96 

— 604 (2) 000692 MURMURMQ9(D)|JRedmond)SOow4-6-6-CQmmbe6(7) 80 

— 505 (B) 603004 RESTORE 33 (B£D^AS) (Mre S Khan) G Lewis 7-6-6- PwEdOery *99 

— 506 P) 005053 DUCOO(BAG)(JGood)MJarvis5-64-DBfoge(5) 71 

— 50 7 P) 102-000 GALACTIC IOBE14 (D^) (A Budge Ltd) R Hannon 3-6-2— Data Ofeaon (3) 09 

eblINk 3-1 Restore, 4-1 Prohtk ti on. Be Ftosh, 11-2 Dbco, 31 Miemereig, Green OoUar, 14-1 

GbIbcOo Scheme. 

1889: MADRACO 38-12 S Cauthen (8-1) L Codd 9 ran 


4.45 SURPLICE STAKES (3-Y-O: £5,952: Im) (6 runners) 

601 (2) 1-200 RAJ 8MK180 (C^F) (R TaMno) G Harwood 310-R Cochrane S3 

002 ( 6 ) 22-112 HALSTONFRMCt7(D^F^fl)(WFonsonby)H Cecil98- SCetdhen 93 

603 (1) 0-311 MBJ5TREL DANCER 15 (F) (E Evans) L Cumart 9-8_L Dettori 80 

604 (3) 301102 THAJQB23(D^Ji)(HamdanAf-Maktoum)JGosden9-8-WCanon 58 

605 (4) 31-3 RSStENCEUOHr7(S)(SlrGWh6»)MStouta31- WR9wMwm«99 

606 (5) 364232 WAKI GOLD 15 (LatrisH Norris) PKeBewey 311-Pet Eddery 83 

BETTING: 2-1 Reference Light 3-1 Thakib. Halston Prince, 1 1-2 Raj WaM, Minstrel Dancer, 7-1 Waki 

Gold. 

1989: SABOTAGE 35 W R Swteburn p-4 fov) M Stous 2 ran 

5J20TRUNDLE HANDICAP (££368: im 4f) (6 runners) 

1 P) 00-2520 GULP PALACE 29 (D^.S) (Mre V HawWns) R Akehurst 3310_J Raid 97 

2 P) 0103 GADABOUT 24(F) (KAbduBa)R Chariton 3-35-Pat Eddery S3 

3 (2) 0-110 ABB.PROSPECT91 (DflfNDeSavory)GHarwood334_RCoctmne 83 

4 0) 343211 PfUN C C HA NN IBAL24 (F) (D HunniaMO J Dunlop 3-90_WCmaon «99 

5 ( 6 ) 140442 ROSG 8 X 14(F) (Brtgadar Racing) P Mitchell 4-311_M MBs 97 

8 (4) 0-30205 JAMMi 24 (J Pearce) GVfcagg 08-1-G Carter 96 

DtniNft 34 Gadabout 31 Prince Hannfoal, 4-1 RosgB, 31 Gutf Palace, 7-1 Jamtn, Abel Prospect 
1989: POKEY’S PRB3E 6-39 R Gochrene (7-1) M Tompkins 6 ran 


WRSwMmm 0 99 
_ Pat Eddery 83 


-J Raid 97 

. Pet Eddery S3 
RCocfMM 83 
_ W Carson «89 

- M HUB 97 

— G Carter 96 


Course specialists 


TRAINERS 


JOCKEYS 


HCeca 

Winners 

30 

Rumors 

99 

Percent 

39/4 

Pal Eddery 

Winners 

74 

Ridas 

330 

Percent 

22.4 

Mrs LPrggoQ 

6 

19 

31.8 

L Dettori 

10 

49 

20/4 

J Berry 

9 

35 

25.7 

S Cairthen 

48 

249 

195 

G Harwood 

<7 

IB* 

255 

wCarcen 

53 

305 

17.4 

LCumani 

25 

106 

235 

Mmis 

11 

73 

15.1 

M Stouta 

23 

■ 99 

235 

J Rad 

25 

168 

151 


<Nof Inckjong yestarria/s rasuKsi 

&50 MAR. ON SUNDAY SERIES HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £5,617: Im) (13 
runners) 


.C47 * 


1 ( 12 ) 7121 INVITATION WALTZ 16 (FA (L Afldones) L Cunani 37- 4 FBt te na (9 OS 

2 pi) 405002 ARANY 29 ( 8 ) (Mre P Kafenan) M Tompkins 36- C Hodgson (7) 91 

3 (9 122-54 ROUnLAMTl 37 (BFG) (G 8 »awfaridge) l Balding 95.. B Boymond 88 

4 (3) 1-3 AZADEN 94 fBFM (J Brody) G Harwood 3Z--- A dark 90 

5 (13) 11-0 THEHOOL 45 (F) (Makaxan ALMaktaan) M Stoute 30- Paul Eddery 80 

6 (S) 16-051 S 8 .VER ORE 17 fDJ=) (A.FOuMok) W O'Gorman 313.- A Monro 96 

7 (7) - 04210 STARLIGHT FLYER 21 (DJ3 (E Fustok) M Moubarek 313-R Me 86 

8 (10) 331254 BOTTLES 35 (D.F) (Bodes Raetaurant Shermglum) G H idler 312 M Wlgham 94 

9 (2) 241-08 CROUPBI 15 (CJ3) (Mre J HWop) C Britain 35- M Roberta 999 

10 ( 6 ) 210212 PALATIAL STYLE 36 (D£) (Mrs P Arison) M Arison 86 -S Webster 97 

11- (4) 21-0633 BARKSTON SMQER 9 (D) <T Morns) I Campbell 32- K Ooriey 64 

12 (1) 0054 SMART MAGICIAN 52 (BF) (B Hagges) W Ha^as 7-7- J Lowe 98 

13 ( 8 ) 854812 TAYLORS PMMCE 11 (VJBFf) (P Reed) H CoBngridge 7-7-A Matey 91 

Long ha n dica p: Taylors Prince 7-4. 

BETONG: I'M Azadeh. 7-2 InriWfon Waltz. 32 Routaanto. 31 Bootes. 7-1 Bariston Singer. 31 
Croupier. 11-1 ThehooL 131 others. 

1989: FBtfTftE 2-7-4 pale Gfoson p32) G Wragg 10 ran 

PORM POP I IQ INVITATION WALTZ maiden by 9 on her only sun lest term and wB 
rUITIVI rVl/UO was hard ridden to Improve on her » 3rd behind River Nomad in a 
defeat Sajteya by a short head at Chepstow (7f, graduation race at Ascot (im. good to ttrm) on her 
firm); previously made no impression on Sundance reappearenco. Sn.va ORE was ridden out to beat 


FORM FOCUS r'sr^ 


Kid when b ea t e n 0 In a match at Goodwood (71. 
good). 

ARANY vms outpaced behind Saly Rous ki grotto 
company at Ascot (71, firm); latest Ym 2 nd to recent 
Goodwood scorer Baizushka in a Beverley hancficap 
(im 100 yd. good to firm). 

ROtmLAWTE dd not get a dear run at Salisbury (7f. 
good to (km) when 3»l 4th behind Charming and ran 
Dead Certain to 2)41 in a group I) race u York (Of. 


Coral Flutter at Yarmouth (im). 

PALATIAL STYLE ran on to taka a Ripon hancfic a p 


' Star at Newca s tle (Im. good). TAYLORS PWNl 
ran on wefl in the final furlong whan 2 nd beaten 21 


Dancing Sensation at Yarmouth (71. 
preeviousiy won at Leicester (71. goc 
length from Final Enigma. 


beaten 21 by 
ood to firm): 
to firm) by a 


_ good to firm). AZADEH easily picked up a Leicester I SatacSon: ROUTILANTE 

*" 420 COLMAN’S OF NORWICH NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £18,925: (- ■■ -rsi; . . ^ 

60 (14 runners) ^ ' ' V 

1 (14) 0111 BIJOUX tron 8 (DJ%G) (P SavS) R Htetoshead 37- K Dariey 87 

aa 2 (9) 11 JOLTS PRINCESS 19 (DJP) (P Hart) M Ryan 36-B Raymond 95 

tag 3 (3) 31 GROVE ARIES 9 (D^> IP Bette HMgs Lid) M TempMns 36- C Hodgson (7) 80 

84 4 ( 4 ) 446112 SILKEN SAILED 4 (Bfl (R Maedows) W O'Gorman 35 Emma Ottenaan (7) »99 

79 5 (2) 2211 ALUNSOWS KATE 21 (F> (W Spa*) T Barron 33- Ain Greaves (S) 91 

_ S (81 1163 Cm SOLACE 14 (F) (D Carutft) R Hannon 90-B Renee 90 

ay 7 (5) 82311 KESTREL FORBOXE9 21 (DJ=) (Laurel Leisure Lid) J Barry 311 J Forum (3) 98 

S 2 8 ( 1 ) 3312 CARESS 29 (F) (Etevard ChaSens estensnaw) Mre N Mncwte y 310 N Adame SS 

as 9 (71 0212 SPKE TRADER 19 (HPJLG) (T T-Jone^ T Thomson Jones 8 - 8 . S WMnmrth 87 

94 10 nit 0213 PRINCESS TARA 26 (OJF) IROkfvate Lid) G Lewrs 8-6 - Pete Ed dery 98 

_ 11 (ID) 21 LAUNDE ABBEY 22 (F) (Miss M Carrtogton-Sofln) C Brittain 33. M Roberts 87 

78 12 (18) 0542 AMANQHLA 12 (N JSGkSOn) Kim TWder 33-— S3 

93 13 (13) 021 PENNY MNT 26 (AG) (A Norman-Thorpe) J Eustace 7-13- H Hte 83 

94 14 ( 6 ) 231248 NORTHSO* CONQUEROR 12 (Winning PD 6 t Raong LU) C Allan 7-11 A M a ckey 92 

SI BErriwa: 32 SBcen Sailed. 4-1 Joks Princess. 32 Pnncass Tara, 11-2 BqotKDOr.3t Laitoda Abbey. 
Si 131 Anandhia, 12-1 Caress, 14-1 others. 

88 1989: DOR 8 ET DUKE 37 Paul Eddery (7-2) G Wragg 11 ran 


FORM FOCUS ssr 


(lllb better off) at Bevertoy (5f. good to firm) and 
Mowed up Wdn 8 21 success over Just John at 


rwvvg pteied 3 trebte wtoi a Mowed ig» won a 21 soc« 

41 defeat of Heaven-Uegh-Grey In a 4-runner race at Leiee^r^: krtMthmi^dinariuraery 
POntefraO (5f, ftonL here (5f). CTrY SOLACE 6 Ki 3rd of 6 to Ivory Bride 

jolts princess made sfl to beat Screen Sere- to Newtuy (Sf. good to firm). KESTREL FORbOXES 

M-^Sgn^DesrelSinaseierai 
on debut and Mowed up with a 31 success over “Oi* (of. good to firm). 

Dome Lawel at Windsor (Bf. good to fem). PfitNCCSS TARA beat Level 

grOvE ARKS beat Shotas 9 In a 3nmner race to ^ ^5JwL2i,PSl!r 
Yarmouth (Bf, good to firm). SLKEN 8 ABA opened 3rd of 5 to Dominion Goto 
Ms sxounwfih an a9 Die way 21 defeat (X CARES Selection: SILKEN SAILED 

450 GLYFADA STAKES (2-Y-O: £7,440: 7f) (5 runners) 




1 (to 1 MARAAKg 26 fiXF) (Hamdan M-hWooum) J Dunlop 32_ B Rouse 94 

2 (5) 21 PLAN OF ACTION 11 (W=) (Ptanftow Leasing Ltd) G Lewts 32. Pete Eddery 78 

3 (2) 12 SEIF EXPRESSION 14 (DJ) (Tbe Quean) I Baktog 31-— B Raymond 6 89 

4 (a M IF rnrrtrtra (Mine A ftettn) r. mm AA u rw, 81 

5 (1) WAR BEAT (W Gredwy) C Btat&Jn 311-M Roberta — 

BETTMte 138 Self Expression. 34 Maraakte, 32 Plan Of Action, 31 U) Ungto, 131 War BeaL 

1889s «EY DUS1BI35 W Ryan (3Q H Ceel) 5 rai 

pnDM PnrilQ IMRMMZ, a Saesbury maidan (7f, good to firm) first Broe out end 
rwntYI FWWaUO B4a goo 9ts son of wont on to finish a nS^creditahleftl 2 nd behind 
Roberto, made an kigpessive debut at Skrtdown(7f) Bravefoot at Nawowy (ri. good d fim). L£ LINGOT 
c o mfo rtably ac cou nting for MuJCtoer by 3L ran on was fn die final funong, (usMymg tavountsm 


up with a focna 4) vkdore over Gr 
maidan A uction r ace to Yarmouth 
SELF EXPRESSION MelCoppeS 1 


odtoflm). 

bylKitoa 


<sn! 7f. 

SatoBtoH! MARMXH 


5^0 CARDINAL HAMJICAP (24,69ft Im 2f) (8 runners) 

1 m 383036 ALJAfBH 92 AG) (Hamdan AMMdnan) H Thomson Jones 4-3TO— 


1 (8) 983036 ALJAfBH 92 KLG) (Hamdan AMMdman) H Thomson Jones 4-3T0... R NBto 92 

2 fl) 3S213D HARO TO NAK 36 (BF/) (Eaora to C Bteckweil) E BqSn 336- A Haefcay 97 

9 (5) 341002 LOTS OF LUCK 14 (Dfl (R Patrick) J Pearce 7-35_W Hwro te 97 

4 (Q BIMiaS TCP OF THE BEL 4 (p) (J UiOCk) N Ctoaghan 3312_D HoSand (5) 96 

5 (4) 525111 SHARQUM 12 (DJ=,Q) (M Murphy) M Bnttan 3310_ M Wlgham 96 

6 (3) 433415 REGGAE BEAT 11U (F) (E Cempbto) I Campbell 339_C Bra (7) SO 

7 (7) 300002 NAZMAH 30-(04>) (A HaSshsi) A Hide 4-33_ B Rouse 9 99 

8 Pi 300221 KAUtPARIY 15 (B jCW) (Ms R lamb) C Benstead 4-7-13_J Lowe 93 

BETTWQs 34 itaBniah.31 Lota Of mck, 32 Sharqoin, 31 Top Of The Bui, 31 Hard To Name, 131 

Afarst. 131 oewre. 

190W HALL OF aanon 38-11 w CBreon (BV)(W Ham) a ran 


WINDSOR 


son when beating Theatrical Charmer 3 In a Listed I SM oct lo n: MOON CACTUS (nap) 

345 VO DATA NWSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £6,368: 7f) (10 runners) 

401 (2) SI LBTRW PR0E 21 (DJ3) (Gaflagner Contractors Ltd) G Lewis 37 Pat Eddery 88 i 

402 (B) 2253 RAY HOMAGE 24 (Miss A HiB) I BaMing 3* _ __ S Canteen 87 

409 (5) 10US42 ALMA 8 A S (G) (M Washer) J Fox S -2 _J Wtoeme 899 

404 (4) 41 SM BANCROFT S3 (F) (D Price) H CoOngridge 313 — __j <hm 93 

405 ( 6 ) 311 SVSI FACH 14 PJ^ (W Joyce) M BeD 312-J Weaver (7) 93 

406 (3) 0154 PORT VAUBAM 21 (F) (A Budge US) R Hamon 310_Date Gteon (3) 37 

40/ (1) 043 GflfiEMflUS LAD 21 (Thomflefd Securities) R Akehurst 310_J ReM 88 

408 ( 10 ) 5311 WMPPERSDaJGffr 19 (D^^)(Moss Side Radng Group) J Berry 35 WCanon S3 

409 (9) 543 GOtDEN GBIStAL 30 (J Baring) W Wfightoan 32___R Fas 93 

410 (7) 0303 MAMALAMA 11 (Mrs S Cook) L Holt 30_T Vffifienm 88 

BETTING: 4-1 Leitrim Pride. 31 Whtepera Deflgtit 31 Sipsi Fach. 7-1 Sv Bancroft. 31 Pay Homage. 

Portvauban, Goklsn GaneraL Aknasa. 131 Mamatona, 14-1 GraanMte Lad. 

1969: NATIVE TUBE 37 W R Swinbum (31 lav) B Hanbury 13ran 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

6.0 Gardeners Boy: 6.25 Twilight Fantasy: 6.55 
Knocks von: 7.20 Once Upon A Time: 7.50 
Cronk's Courage: S.20 Full Orchestra. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
6.0 Green’s Trilogy. 6.25 Handsome Leader. 6.55 
Carfietd Lad.7.20 Absaar. 8^0 Barrymore. 

Going: good to firm 

Draw: 5f-6f, high numbers best 

SJO EBF KRONENBOURG MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y- 
O: £3,515:6f) (17 runners) 


04 ABSOLUTELY RIGHT 17 S Dow 8-0 _BCro*aby7 

OS AQEETEE64ATunel30_JWttameS 

EAST SUNRISE BQuoby 98_JQutrm 13 

666 EASYTOOMEY7JJenkatS9-0_RFo*3 

FAST RUN P Cole 30_SOTVeffl(7)11 

0 FREE FOR AIL 15 L Holt 30_TWBamsB 

5 GARDENERS SOT 15 P Cole 30_TOtomlO 

5 GREEN3TRILOGY 14Wjarvs30_MTabbntt9 

ILBAHBMO P Cola 30_SDawaao4 

LAST TAKE M Usher 30_ MMbMwD(5)17 

LONG FURLONG JDunko 30_ACkrk12 

00 LORD ADVOCATE 47 RChariton9-0_ SRmoMZ 

0 MATAKATA IS J Dunlop 30_AMcOonoM 

20 TEXAN CLAMOUR 16 R Hannon 90_R Femhem (5) 5 

VDEO DEALER CHorgaa 30-C Rutter 15 

HARRTS LADY T Thomson Jonas 38_A Mums 1 

IRISH IMPULSE RWBtams 99_G Baxter 14 


7-2 Gardeners Boy, 4-1 Fast Run, 9-2 Matamata. 6-1 
Absolutely Right. Long Furlong. 132 Texan Clamour. 

6.25 HOFMEISTER SELLING STAKES (£2,616: Im 
70yd) (15) 

1 403 CLEVER CLAUDE 894 WPariih 488-JQntenl 

2 0000 HANDSOME LEADER 82 (tyG Eden 490 

RSkteteton14 

3 2004 StMGROVEPRBE23EWheeler490— SDawsooS 

4 -001 TWDJGKT FANTASY 33 (COJ 1 ) M Stenshard 49-0 

JWHamalO 

5 4 - YE9CAN19SJT Thomson Jonas 430-TOtenn 6 

6 0000 ROYAL SUPREME 28 (S) GlteW 3312-A Oak 9 

7 306 UANE BEAUTY 14 Mrs S Armyoge 4-39—_ R Fax 4 
84036 PB66LLFLAME23DHawfoJones499 GBexterll 
9 0300 BEUNOA'SBOY 18WCarter3-37 SCam#(7)2 

10 0056 FLORIDA GOLD 10 DVHscn 337-TWnm3 

11 0&34 PLEASURE AHEAD 12 M Ctennon 3-37_ C Ratter 13 

• 12 -605 THE SWAMP FOX 7 K Brassey 3-37__— AMunrsB 

13 0805 B 8 UXE CHANCE IDS Dow 332.-AUcfflone 12 

14 5500 CHANDANNE 12 T Casey 3-32-G BanTwefl 7 

15 IMS ENTERPRISE LADY 17 (BF) P Makm 332 

T Sprite (5) 15 

32 Yestcan, 32 Pteasura Ahead. 31 TwOgM Fantasy. 31 
Enterprise Lady. 31 Clever Claude. 131 others. 


Fast Run. 9-2 Matamata. 31 


C NEWTON ABBOT ) 

Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Walk Of Life. 2.45 Temple Reef. 3.15 Plaza 
Toro. 3.45 Sign PosL 4.) 5 Circus Tavern. 4.45 
Rohib. 

Going: good to firm (watering) 

2.15 DIMPLEX TANGO HANDICAP CHASE (£2.736: 
2m 50 (4 runners) 

1 423 WELSH OAK 105 (CtLF AS) D GavtoUo 1312-0 

2 113 WALK OF LffE 66 (B^tLFJJ)M Pipe 5-136 

3 313 KARNATAK 86 (C^K Bridgwater 3135 

D Bridgwater (T) 

4 140/ RtCKAROUOWEART812TOWGlhmar 13130 

□ Ctartes Jones 

94 Wefc Of Life, 5-2 Welsh Oak, Kamatak. 31 Richard 
Uonheart. 

2.45 DIMPLEX LANGLEY SELLING HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£1.506:2m 150yd) (7) 

1 413 TEMPLE REEF 340 fiLF,9M Ape 312-0 PScadaoere 

2 03/PHARAOH BLUE 495 (ILriM Pipe 31311—- — 

3 323 CARJUJEN 91 (DAB Preace 3137- Gary Lyons (3) 

4 P03 SPAR LADY 128 J Roberts 7-131_PDevar 

5 403 LOVER COVER69 A JWflson3130- L Harvey 

6 003 GO-GO-SAM 177PWakaiy3130_— 

7 354- MAPLE HAYES 79 Mrs A KrigM 4130— NMaenffi) 
Evens Temple Reel. 31 Pharaoh Blue. 31 Cadufen, 7-1 

Spar Lady. 31 Lover Cover. 141 others. 

3.15 DIMPLEX STYUST HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£2,220:2m 5f 110yd) (7) 

1 503 LECAROTTE ITS (CQF.G) A Bartow 3130— SEade 

2 3/3 MARSH KING 273 (GAP Hobbs 311-12 Peter Hobba 

3 122- PLAZA TORO 304 ^JF/S)WG Turner 11-11-0 

C Dempsey [7) 

4 TP3 CHAMPAGNE RUN 68 (F/5)WGM Turner 3139 

J Re nee (7) 

5 132- JttoT BUUCE 284 (FXOJ Roberts 3134 L Honey 

6 11> ULTRA VtOLET 84 TOHM Pipe 4130. P Scudamore 

7 113 GREY ADMBUL 63 P/JFfii G SttWand 3130 

MrSSflcUwd 

34 Ultra Violet 31 Plaza Toro. 41 Just Biaka. 31 Le 
Carrara. 7-1 Marsh King. 3i others. 


( MAREJBTRASEN 1 ) 

Selections 

By Mandarin 

6.15 Little Red Flower. 6.45 Far More. 7.15 
Sailor's Delight. 7.4S Island Jctscuer. S.IS Taffy 
Jones. 8.45 Casbatina. 

Going: firm 

6.15 ROTARY CLUB OF MARKET RASEN JUNIOR 
SELLING HURDLE (£1,772:2m) (14 runners) 

1 06P- RJESENER7F Mrs P Barter411-7.-CHrafdm 

2 SHEHA8WLCREST7FNTinkler411-7. GMcCeuri 

3 KARS6 STARLET 25F M femond 411-2. S Turner 

4 LADY OF THE LODGE 4MFJG0*W411^ SJOThto 

5 202- LITTLE RED ROWER 88 F Jordan 411-2 JLodder(3) 

8 MY PRETTY NIECE lOFCHoknes 411-2 DSkyrmep) 

7 ADANAR 21FI Campbel 3i35-SWoede 

8 BOLD ROCKET 45F G Bearer 3-135- BMcGKf(5) 

9 DSRCSSLADfilFDTopwy3-136- KJenet 

10 HAVERT0N9FT Casey 3135.— RDrowoody 

11 MTKRflYBOY40FRO'Leary3135.- MDwyer 

12 tKBfTNMO THUNDER 42F Denys SnAh 3130 C Grant 

13 SAUCY SAMT29FP BkxUey3135- CKaBaB 

14 imSPEEB0or30FJPMfC83-l3Q-ROWaH[7) 

11-4 Little Red Flower. 41 Haverton. 5-1 SneBas HBtresL 

31 Adanar. 31 Ughttong Thunder. Mrs Peatxxty. 12-1 others. 

6.45 JOHN DEERE NOVICES HURDLE (£1.733:2m 
4f)(8) 

1 COUNT MY BLESSINGS ISFBESntl 31t9 

AHohnd 

2 OSP- FALLING FOSS 83 T Kersey 311-0. 9nroltenei(7) 

3 023- PADDY’S GLEN 63 Mrs P Barker 1311-0- CHmridns 

4 SKYRAPGOtorow 311-0-ROentty (3) 

5 34 eVE#6NGSUN^T7F(B) MiSS GRe« 41311 

W WMMpgton 

8 43- FAR MORE MFFDWT 41311_SSeWbEcdu 


RACING 


Selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Vintage Only. 2,50 French Senor. 3.25 For 
Real. 3.55 Topasannah. 4.25 Golden Treasury-. 
4.55 Millionaire's Row. S.25 La Maraquiia. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.50 French Senor. 3.55 Sapphirine. 4.25 Golden 
Treasury. 4.55 Millionaire's Row. 5.25 Black 
Armorial- 


Going: Ann Draw: 5f-G(, high numbers best SIS 

2.15 TOPCUFFE STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,608; 61) (2 
runners) 

1 4121 VINTAGE ONLY 15 (ILF£)MHEa5&fby 9-10 MBMlI 

2 1354 BEYOND OUR REACH 29 (F) J Beny9-4_„ J Carrel 2 

1- 4 Vintage Only. 31 Beyond Our R Bach- 

230 SUTTON MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £2,526:7f) 

(?) 

1 3 EURO GALAXY 376 RWMater 30- ACuBhm4 

2 34 FRENCH KWH) 15 (BF) H Cecil 9-0-WRyanl 

3 -406 SHMtNG JEWEL 7 E Ekfin 30_GDuffMd2 

4 2400 BRACKEN BELLA 56 E Wwmes 89_EGvwie 

5 05 HIGHLY NOTED 12 FLte 39_Oeaa UeKsown 5 

6 -500 VAIN SEARCH 92 M Janre 8-9-R Lapp* (5)7 

7 4282 2tZANtA35Camtam89-UBnh3 

34 French Senor. 32 Zizania. 31 Shtnmg Jewel. 31 Vain 

Search. 12-1 Eva Gatexy. 131 Bracken Bella. Highly Notad. 

3J2S WHITE HORSE COMPUTER SELLING 
STAKES (Ladies: 3-Y-O: £2.511: 6f) (9) 

1 0000 Afi£ VALLEY LAD 23 (B)RBas»nfln 130 

King liomi l 

2 0028 SWNG NORTH 14 (BAG) D Chapmi 109 

Etem Bronson 2 

3 000 QOU8LE STRAND 30 RVfttttew 99- Ly^Prorcafi 

4 3203 FOR REAL 5 (CAF.G) J Berry 3-9 — Uaa Eaton (5) 9 

5 0026 FOUNTAIN LOCH 22 (DJ^ RWhtafcar 9-9 

Sharon Ifeagxtroyd 3 

6 5300 MMS KELLYBELL10 R Thompson 99 

Hatea CiusnagloR (7)1 

7 0K5 SOWOS CLASSICAL 23 W Storey 99 

Stefle Surer (7)7 

8 094 STAR LEADER ia R Hotnshaad 9-9 GmtediMReM8 

9 5310 TtFFM TIME 37 (BF/T) M H Easterby 9-9 

LaRa Fahey (5)5 

2- f Far Real, 3-1 Swing North. 7-2 Tiffin Time. 5-1 others. 


7 353- HTTW 93 (B) PBtocktey 4-10-11-CKa&att 

8 B24 CAWSTON BAY S3 J Norton 5-10-9- Hr K Johrson (3) 
9-4 Far More. 11-4 PadO/a Qten. 9-2 Evening Sunset 

7.15 QUEEN ELIZABETH THE QUEEN MOTHER 
BIRTHDAY NOVICES CHASE (£2,095:2m Sf) (7) 

1 104- CAUTIOUS FETE 138W A Stephenson 7-11-5_— 

2 324 EASTERN PLAYER 30F FAS) Mea GEteS 7-1 

W ll/m dvi rmi 

3 €53- GAN ON LAD $3 [F} K Morgan 9-11-0—. ASflSfl 

4 RS3 OHBX SKY 63 T KOrSOT 311-6-Aloracti(7) 

5 332- SAINTS DOK3HT123 W A Stephenson 311-6 

C Grant 

6 0F0- SWGMC FLARE 04 jO'SnmS-ll-fl_ TWri 

7 0/0- SLANEY RAMBLER 75 (V) C HoiJBfiS 311-8 

DSkymeTO 

34 SaOQtB DBiigM. 32 Gan On Lad. 31 Eastern Rayar, 


3^5 EUROPRINT PORTFOLIO STAKES (3-Y-O- 
£3,106: im) (8) 

1 6422 lA RSP0R SENA7(nRWf>earar99_ACottma 

2 1005 EXPRESS ACCOUNT 11 TOCO/) HWanarasW 

_ _ Alteon Horpar(7)2 

3 0201 TOPASAMUH14TOF)BH08 3i1. Doaa fifeKaoon 7 

4 2000 PIFFY14 FAS) RwWd Ttxxroson 311. R PEBodS 

5 3121 SAPPHBONE 8 p,F^ M Prescott G Unffiakf 5 

6 6020 MGH WATER 12 T FantH^Sl 36_J Fancsw (71 a 

7 6221 EUR08LAXE5(0,F)TBarton&2(6ax). LChanOEkl 

8 6000 PRESIDENT GEORGE 37 M Snttain 7-7... S Wood (2)6 
8-4 Sapphirine. 11-4 Topasannah. 7-2 Lars Poraono, 31 

EuroWake, 131 High Water. Express Account 33-1 others. 

4.25 YORKSHIRE TELEVISION HANDICAP 
(£3,940: Tm 4f) (3) 

1 2012 NICHOLAS MMBC 7 (CD,FJ3) R Whiakfir 89-10 

NCcanS»2 

2 4331 G0U3BITREASURY 17(Or)HCato339. WRyanl 

3 -205 FAMOUS BEAUTY 26 (QRHgBftShsad 3313 

G Husband (5)3 

4- 11 Golden Treasury. 11-4 Nicholas Mane, 12*1 Famous 
Beauty. 

4.55 BEDALE GRADUATION STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£2.761:1m4f) (2) 

1 3445 BEAU GUEST 19 (ftH R ffoflnshaad 37— S Paries 2 

2 21 MfLLXMAIRE^ ROW 14 (D.F) H Cecd 37_ W Ryes 1 
1-6 Mfflonaina's Row, 4-1 Beau OuasL 

5J!5 DIRECTORS TROPHY (Nursery Hancficap: 2- 
Y-O: £3,132: 70 (9) 

1 6251 AZUREUS120JSWfcon9-7-J Fanning (7) 3 

2 4434 CALLATBGHtll JEthetouton312-MBtett2 

3 0381 BLACK ARMORIAL ID (Dp) M Bed 311 - GDaffuMB 

4 4532 GODSCHARM 7 (ft M Brmaffl 8-8-5 Kteonoy (5) 9 

5 0221 ME DU CIRQUE 8 (F) N Caiaghan 7-12 FNon»m4 

6 313 LA laARIQUlTA 7 (BFAG) M H Eastartrjr 7-11 

LChamock? 

7 6481 OBOURE9(F)MUsher7-9-EJatetS»5 

8 MSI CLASSIC RMB17TOF) T Fanhursi 7-9... S Wogd (to 1 

9 2203 OREENSX3E11 R Thorpson 7-7_ Cteiie BptCing (7) 8 

3- 1 Rue Du Cirque. 7-2 Godseharm. 9-2 Azureus. 6-1 
Oboraa, ffiack Armoruii, 31 others. 

Coarse specialists 

TRAINERS: H Ced 10 vifcintnfrom 30 runners. S3.3V B HBs, 
11 from 36. 30.6^; M H Eastarby. 37 Iran 231. 160%: R 
Whitaker. 18 from 127,14£<fe: M Prescott. 3 from 24,12£%; J 
Barry, 13 from 117.11.1%. 

- JOCKEYS: R Lappin. 3 wmnara from 15 rides. 20.0%; M Birch. 
37 tram 246. 15.0%; Dean McKoown. 15 tram 106. 14.2%: S 
Parks. 14 from 105.132%: NComonsn. iSfrran 124,121%: A 
Cc«iana. 10 tram 85.11.8%. 

635 BEAMISH NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: 
£2.739: 50 (7) 

1 1422 CARFITOO LAD 22 (BAH G PrKfiarti-GOnfon 8-7 

W R SwWnrrn 7 

2 011 KNOCXAVON19(D.G)JBarry9-6_PatEddareS 

3 8410 LAM) SUN 12(VJLF] MChaMUnB-11_C Rutter 5 

4 2490 BUD’S BET 5 L Hok 8-7___JRaidl 

5 420 CHEStflREfELL Sf (BF)W Carter 89 

nXB tCuUf 4 

6 300 WHTTTONLAD21 (B)RAkehursiB-3._WCereonS 

7 5424 ZONtNA 33 R Hannon 8-0_AMcGkme3 

5- 2 Knockavon, 4-1 2onlna.9-2Car1reW Lad. 5-1 Land Sun. 
8-1 Cheshire Nell, Whmon Lad, 12-1 Bud's Bet 

7.20 COURAGE TAKE HOME TRADE HANDICAP 
(3-Y-O: £4.115: Im 3f 150yd) (3) 

1 21 ABSAAR 24 (DJF) A Stewart 9-7_M Robert* 2 

2 4352 ONCE UPOti A TIME 15 (F)! Bakflnq M. Pet Eddarv t 

3 00-9 J R JONES 110 (F.C) OBurcheil8.il_N Adams 3 

Evens Absaar. 11-10 Ones Upon A Time, 8-1 J R Jones. 

7.50 MILLER UTS HANDICAP (£2,616: 5f) (15) 

1 -000 GUNBOAT 4SK Brassey 4-9-10-5 Whitworth 4 

2 2314 CROMCS COURAGE 21 (EJJ.F.S) G Lewis 4-9-9 

Paul Eddery 14 

3 -000 NAZAKAT16 {PJF) L Holt 3-9-5-J Reid 7 

4 3004 IRON KING IT (Of R Hannon 4-9-4 M Pal Eddery 13 

5 00P2 DAMASKEEN 14 (DJI Mrs S Armytaga 4-9-3 

DanaUefiorB 

6 0444 TNORNZEE19JBridgar39-12— RaeMBfidgar(7)1 

7 00-0 SEVEN SONS IB (D/> W G M Turner 3-8-12 

M Robertas 

8 -500 OR NOR 19 (D,F) W Carter 3-8-9_S Cairns (7) 12 

9 4256 BEAUM0NT8KEEP5LHod4-89_TWWansB 

10 504 SAMSOHAGONISTES 7 p.G) 8 McMahon 4-8-7 

Ron KM* (5) 5 

11 6200 UNDERTONES 52 (B) J Qwer 3-8-7-G Baxter 2 

12 2010 DAWN BELL 5 |G) J Bradley 5-8-1-A Tucher (7) 15 

13 0050 EECEETREE26PArthur6-7-7-N0N-RUWER3 

14 0000 ROYAL BEAR 9 (DJvS) K CUMngham^Riwn 8-7-7 

GBtedwaBII 

15 400 MtSS WESLEY 14(BJJ.F)ATumall 5-7-7. N Adana 10 

4- 1 Crank's Courage, 5-1 Iran King. 6-1 Damaskeen. 189 
Samson-Agonistes. 8-1 Dawn Belt. Thonuee, 10-1 others. 

;ft20 JOHN SMITH MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: 
;£2,696:1m2f 22yd)(11) 

1 22 BARRYMORE 35 (BF)L Cunani 9-0-L Dettori 2 

2 COMMANDING OFFICER C Cyzer 9-0_JMorraylO 

3 FLOWN R Harmon 9-0-M Roberts 7 

4 550- GOZOfE241EBdteM_AMa3tey9 

5 55 SHEERWHID15 J Hudson M_S Whitworth 3 

6 3 TRAFUL 80 M Stouie 9-0_W R Swinbum 8 

7 2 AVRA64HCecil8-9____AMcGkxie* 

8 23-2 FULL ORCHESTRA 19 W Hem 89-W Carson 1 

9 2625 ORLEANS GBL 23 R Smyth 89_T Quinn 5 

10 4 SINGING FOREVHM61 Bating &«__J Reid 4 

11 0 YEMANJA 25 R Charlton 6-9-S Raymont 11 

2-1 Banymora. 5-2 Full Orchestra. 9-2 Avra, 6-1 Trafcd. 

Course specialists 

TRAINERS: H Cecal. 18 winners from 44 runners. 38.4»i; A 
Stewart, n from 36.28.9°o; L Cutnanj. 11 from 41. 26.SV M 
Stouta. 16 from 65.24.S'*: I BaKtmg. 8 from 46. T7.4-,; P Cote. 
16 from 101.15^*i. 

JOCKEYS: Pat Eddenr. 7D wmners from 256 rates. 24.5 s *: L 
Dettori, 8 from 39.20.5“i-. W R Swinbum. 16 from 113.1SS“*; M 
Roberts. 13 Iran 89.14.6*^; W Carson. 25 tram 205.122"i; T 
Quvm. IB from 160.11.3%. 

3A5 DIMPLEX OPDFLAME NOVICES CHASE 
(£2,203: 2m 150yd) (11) 

1 605- COMAGE23F(F)RJohnsonHugpMon7-11-3 

Hr G Johnson Houghton 

2 P2P- HOISTED 84 Mrs A Knxfit 6-11-3-- GXn^d 

3 PP/ SIGN POST 653 Mrs JWormawr 6-11-3 • 

MrAWoraracoftf/) 

4 fly SPEARHEAD WARRIOR 847 MMuggendge 8-1J-3 

W Irvine (3) 

5 343- TABACOS64 WQTurner7-T1-3-NHawfce(3) 

6 005/ TSUGA FOREST 11U R Champicn 7-11-3 T Grantham 

7 0/ RJRTWO730GRoe9-10-12-Pfltcfeente 

8 /45 MQVLONGMEADEBTOWGMTurner9-10-12 

P Hotey (3) 

9 HO/ MAKMG TRACKS 1687 M FaihorStorHSodtey 8-10-12 

MRUteda 

2-1 Tabacos. 3-1 Coinage. 5-1 Tsuga Forest 6-1 Malang 
Tracks. 8-1 Lady Longmead. 12-1 Hoisted. 25-1 others. 

4.15 DIMPLEX HURSLEY JUVENILE NOVICES 
HURDLE (£1,674: 2m 150yd) (11) 

1 CRCUSTAVHtN M Pipe 10-9-P Scudamore 

2 FAIR START W temp 1DB-I Lawrence (3) 

3 RECORDBXSE12FKBridgwater 10-9. WHumphreya 

4 RUNWAY ROMANCE 12F P Hobbs 10-9. Peter Hcbbs 

5 SAFETY 36F J WWte 10^-- D Monte 

6 CADFOflD BALARMA 7F K Bnogwator 104 _ AWebb 

7 DONNA LORENZA 75F C Weedon 104-ACamt 

8 GOOD C35ACE21FP Hobbs 104_Mr B C0fHd (7) 

9 MK.TONM1SSWGM Timer 104- PHoOum 

10 STRANGER STILL 19FBStevsns 104.. WMcfartend 

11 WOLVER GOLD 12FJ Roberts 104-S Mahon (7) 

4-5 Circus Tavern. 52 Runway Romance. 51 Safety, 10-1 

Cadford Balerira, 14-1 WotverGold. 151 othars. 

4j 45 DIMPLEX ELECTRIC HEATING HANDICAP 
CHASE (£2.656:3m 21100yd) (5) 

1 /33- RAHtia68(OFA5)MPipe5150-PScwtenore 

2 42U- WtMBLEBAU. 80 (F^) J Peyne 151513-R Guest 

3 njS- DUART240TOJ Roberts 10-159-Peter Hobba 

4 OOP- LEG UP 143 <1^ Mre JWomacatt 11-157 

MokWBBans 

5 55P- TUW4BERRY DAWN 109 THaBetl 510-5. S Mahon (7) 
1-2 Rohaj. 7-2 Duart, 51 WJmOJeOall. 14-1 Othara. 

Course specialists 

TRAINERS: C Weedon, 3 winners from 8 runners, 375%: M 
Pipe. 126 from 382. 334%; D GandoHo, 10 tram 50. 20.0%: W 
Kemp. S from 38.132%; J Roberts. 8 from 66.12.1%: P Hobbs. 

13 from 109.11.9%. 

JOCKEYS: P Scudamore. 79 winners from 193 rides. 403%: N 
Mann. 4 from 13.303%: A Weoo. 10 from 64.15 .6%: I Lawrence, 

3 from 24.125% W McFarland, 5 from 41.123%; N Hawke. 5 
from 47.10.6%. 

7AS CLUGSTON HANDICAP HURDLE (£1.900: 
2m) (5) 

1 122- HA'PENNY H AP 70 (F ,03)CBee»flr12-1MO BKcGitf 

2 022- ISLAK) JETSETTER tF (CD.C3) M H Easterby 4-T1-8 

RFahey 

3 234- CASTLEBROWNE 48 Mrs A King 51513 R Dumtoody 

4 0P5 QR05SEN149 P^)K Morgan 6-159_ HDaviaa 

5 435 FINGERS CROSSED 101 (C9jF3) K Ryan 5153 

MMatansy(5) 

54 Island Jetsener, 52 Ha'penny Nap. 51 Rngers 
Crossed. 7-1 Casttebrowna 151 Grosser. 

6.15 HERON NEWARK HANDICAP CHASE 
(£2,684:2m) (6) 

1 414» TAFFY JOICS 1BF{CD,F,G£)M MsCormacfc 11-1M0 

CMMde(7) 

2 311- PRESSURE GAME 54F(aOflKBvrtE 7-11^ 

R Supple 

3 44F* NIVA'S TOUCH 44 (Ffl) Mrs A Kmg 7-1511 

4 3P1- KINGS W1U> 68 TOR A Jones 9-159 . I StoSUrtS 

5 322- STRAIGHT DOWN 68 (0,F,G) Mre? Bark* 15:50 

C Hawkins 

6 034- TAMBTTDWNiAD50FTOf) A Potts 5150— T Petto 
5 a Tafiy Jones. 52 Pressure Gama, 7-2 Kings wad. 51 

Straight Down, 7-1 Riva s Touch. 151 Tamertown Lad. 

ft45 MARKET RASEN ENGINEERING MAIDEN 
HURDLE (£2.118:2m) (17) 

1 (05 FLEET SPECIAL 7F P Uonteith 511-0—— DHotan 

2 064- itAfffirs TWO 6a (WJ Hams 511-0-— J A Karris 

3 42P- MR KEWM1LL 37F J Bennett 7-11-0-——_ NDawe 

4 41- RYTON RStOWN 528 J Norton 511-0—^. PHnrtCy (7) 

5 P65 TIGER TIGER 1*7 Ronao Thompson 511-0 

M Lease (7) 

6 442- UPWELL 71R Johnson 511-0..—— Mr P Johnson (7) 

7 WHITE 5APW1RE7F Affirm FtororaJd511-0 MDwyw 

8 NORTHUMBRIAN IUNQ30FC TfxvrRDn 4-T5(1 

Dwadnsoi 

9 PRB»OLlOaF A Harrison4-1511_~ JCaOaravm ra 

10 523- SNAPPY DATE 44F K Morgan4-1511 HOavtes 

11 233- IRL5WATER 91 P Jordan 4-1511-_^._. J Ladder (3) 

12 hatay 15F P Bfoddey 5159-- P Mhtgtey (n 

13 OID PARK LANE 453FC Hahns 5159 DSkryffieTO 

14 24- SEA ARROW 167 JLagfi 5159_Guy Lyons (3) 

15 2- CAS8ATINA31f JPearoeA-156_GMsCnut 

16 UOP- PEARL WWTE101 K Ryan 4-10-6 fiachei Judgo (7) 

17 315 YOUGOTIT26F(F)RO'Leary4-156.. . - LWyer 

51 Cafitxffina. 4-1 White Sapphire. 51 Snappy Data, 7-1 

Utts water, 8-1 Yougotn. 151 Mr Kewmfl, 151 om«s. 

Course specialists 

TRAINERS: M McCormack, 3 winners from 4 runners, 75 (pi• C 

Thonuoti, 7 from 21.335?-»; M H Eaawt^. 23 trom 9S. 2fl 2®»; N 

Ttnfder, 1? from 52. 23.1‘fk Jimmy FitzgwaM. 38 from 169 
22^:l<»mpWB 1 3lr0m14 1 2l.4V ■ 

JOCKEYS: Mr K Johnson. J mnners from 12 runners. 33J3V B 
MeGAt. 5 from 15. 33 G McCourt. IB tram Sc. 33 3“»: M 
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V 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 

Yachts 


- n-oneyagh tthe beginning of Cowes Week 
—marks the end of a sentimental journey : 





W ith a permanent 
moonng in the social 
calendar between 
Gtonous Goodwood 
and the start to the shooting 
seKon, Cowes Week, thHS 
Md grandest regatta in the world, 
jets under way today. Spruced up 
wrth brating, and banners, thS 
histone Isle of Wight port i*!m£ 5 
much as it was when Queen 
gave the town and its 
festival the royal stamp of 
approval. v 

Kings, queens and their chDd- 
{"have been axtendhig Cowes 


Week ^ taMr Law, 80 percent of the boat 

now origmA Tlnougbom the 


... x . . 

The Vera Mary proved ideal ibr 
restoration. Sold after Sir Philip’s 
death j ast before the second world 
war, she had been Taken to the 
south. of Fiance. While many 
other yachts were left to deteri¬ 
orate, this schooner’s enterpriang 
skipper sailed'her on: smuggling 
rims to South America, using the 
profits to maimam her in sea¬ 
worthy condition. 

In die post-war years,- a bigger 
engine was installed and the yacht 
was re-ijgged, but she has been 
maintained so weO that; according 
taMr Law, 80 per cent of the boat 


-7V : ‘. X C^' 


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fr fS? .«*. •• f: • 

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now sponsored by Land Rover 
las thrived, with more than a 
thousand yachts swelling the al¬ 
ready crowded 
marinas. 

For one yacht, 
the Vera Mary, thk 
. year’s event marks 
a nostalgic return. 

Built in Lyming- 
ton, Hampshire, in 
1932 by the Ber- 
thon boatyard, the 
72ft schooner was 
a gift from George 
V to Sir Philip ' 

Hunloke, the skip¬ 
per of the then 
royal radng yacht 
Britannia. 

Now the 26-ton 
yacht has been Restored: ti 
fully restored by 
the America’s Cup and Olympic 
yachtsman, Chris Law. “I first 
came across her in the brokerage 
columns. She was lying in Elba, 
but I couldn’t afford the asking 
price,” he says. - 

Bitterly disappointed, Mr Law, 
aged 35, lost the sale to a 
northerner who agreed to pay the 
asking price on the yacht’s deliv¬ 
ery back to British waters. “It 
wasn’t until I mentioned her again 
to a broker that I fbund she never 
completed the voyage home. 
Caught in a mistral, the bulwarks 
were broken, the dinghy was 
washed overboard, the slopped, 
broke his ankle-and site was taken 
in a sorry state to PSalma.” 

MrJLawcau^itthC^first^vaa- 
ablepbneto Majorcaund scoured 
the docks until he found the yacht. 
H lf was lam before we eventually 
tracked her down, moored be¬ 
tween two huge motor yachts. I 
struck a deal almost immediate- 
ly,” he says. 


w inter months a. ify m of 
boatbnilders has stripped down 
the hull inside and out and, with 
- tbehetpofeantem- 
por&ry photo- 
. graphs taken by 
Beken of Cowes 
and the original 
■ drawings from 
Berthon’s archives, 
completely .refur¬ 
bished her. 

“It took an idiot 
tikemetotakeona 
project like this: I 
couldn’t afford it 
- mid have sunk ev¬ 
ery brass farthing 
• into herf* Mr Law 
says. Jffis determ¬ 
ination 

Restored: the Vera Mary Peter Briggs, the 
' s Australian rlarerir 
. car ccdkcfor and Admiral's Cop 
skipper, who gave' Mr Law tire 
money to complete his dream. 

Mr Law; who is retained by 
Peter de Savary as a prospective 
skipper for his second tilt at the 
- America’s Cup, willbe using Vera 
Mary this week to entertain 
friends and corporate clients, in 
between raring a class I yacht 
“After a threfryear lajKrff from 
c om pet i t i ve sailing; the schooner 
project has given me a fresh 
enthusiasm for raring,” says Mr 
Law, a former Hnn dass wodd 
champion - who represented 
Britain- m the 1984 Olympic 
Games. “Now, Ftn. looking at 
getting back into the Olympics.” 

. H^ls also JOQfdcBg fbr- Mow 
investees to. share the joy of 
owning adasac yacht “Fm more 
the custodian- of a piece of histoxy 
than the owner. She wall be around 
for very much longer than me, and 
it Is important that she remains in 
British hands,” he says. 


r. , 

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i&fottirri-''-' •• 








F* . ' VvVf 







Barry Pickthall. yachting correspondent 


The Scots 
are on 
course 

Grand Prix gives an 
opportunity to show 
international class 


SCOTLAND’S other intoxicating 
product is the beauty of the Gyde 
estuary (Keith Wheatley writes). A 
year from now it will be home to 
the first-ever event of the Inter¬ 
national Formula One Class 
Yachting Grand Prix series. 
Identical 52ft racing yachts, 
crewed by professional sailors and 
star helmsman, will travel a world 
circuit beginning on the Gyde and 
ending in Australia six months 
later. 

The prize money of approxi¬ 
mately £550.000 is already begin¬ 
ning to attract interest from top 
skippers planning to assemble 
“works” teams. 

Earlier this week, the first of the 
new class of yachts was taken to 
Gourock for trials. The boat is 
designed by Britain’s Tony Castro 
and America’a Bruce Nelson, a 
member of Dennis Conner’s de¬ 
sign group for the 1986/7 Ameri¬ 
ca’s Cup. Trials have already 
shown her to be exceptionally test 
downwind. 

The Scottish Development 
Agency is a partner in the project. 
“This will give us an opportunity 
to let the world know that we are a 
world class sailing centre with 
international facilities,” said Tom 
Band, chief executive of the 
Scottish Tourist Board. 

The Grand Prix organisers plan 
to take the yacht to Cowes Week 
and Mike McIntyre, Star class 
gold medallist at Seoul, and 
Harold Cudmore are among those 
sailors looking at the possibilities 
of the Grand Prix circuit. 

“We calculate that a skipper 
needs to find half-a-million 
pounds of sponsorship for a full 
season's campaign,” said Janice 
Batchelor of Challenge Group, 
who will operate the event in 
Britain. “Half of that is the cost of 
the yacht, the rest goes in travel 
and crew costs.” 




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I-'""", r.- ■» * ■*.«.•'». 





Seagping heritage: Chris Law and the yacht he restored; “it took an idiot like me to take on a project like this. I couldn’t afford it” 


From boy racers to a family weekend Crusader lives 


H aving, been an exu¬ 
berant and successful 
dinghy sailor, Phil 
Morrison is now entering the 
tuition of middle life. “Nice 
wide side-decks,” he com¬ 
mented as he dimbed aboard 
the new Sigma 35 for a test 
ride. 

“On some boats of this sort 
you're in peril of your Kfe if 
you go up to the forededc,” 
ays the Devon-based designer 
tnd boatbuilder. 

The Sigma is designed "to 
ippeal to the club-racer who 
van is to compete in a CHS 
ii vision. Simon Limb, of 
Marine Projects, the company 
hat builds Sigmas, says 
’Both the Sigma 33 and the 38 
ire one-design boats, rather 
meniaied to offshore racing, 
[bis new boat -is perhaps 
somewhat more flexible in the 
ises you can put it to. F amily 
miising as well as Saturday 
iftemoon racing.” 

Mr Morrison’s first reaction 
vas pleasure at the soft, wide? 
adius curves of the coach- 
oof. Its style is low and 
lowing, for more Ferrari than 
ford. Bill Dixon is responsible 
or deck and interior, and 
)avid Thomas has drawn the 
ig, hull and keel as he has 

lone for earlier Sigmas._ 

“I don’t like the very bard 


mmixi 


lines of some Glfr production 
boats that still lock as if they 
were made of mahogany and 
teak,” Mr Morrison says. “I 
didn't expect awheel on a boat 
this size that is designed for 
racing. But being an ex-dinghy 
man Fm probably a lot more 
tiller-orientated." 

Out on Plymouth Sound in 
a. warm .l 0-knot breeze, his 
views on the steering became 
distinctly complimentary. 
“It’s- so positive and the' 
tracking-is excellent- There’s 
very tittle fell-ofT. through a 
tack.” 

Sigma equip the new boat 
with North.sails; two genoas 
<135 per cent and 100 per 
cent), mainsail and tri-radial 
spinnaker. Extra sails for the 
super-keen racer will be avail¬ 
able from North on a produc¬ 
tion rather than pne-off basis, 
providing a considerable say¬ 
ing '. • ’ ‘ 

“Our basic. philosophy is 
thal.yoacaxt put it in the water 
and go dub-racing right out of 
the box,” Mr Limb explained. 

Meanwhile,’ Mr Monison 
was trying, unsuccessfully, to 
induce a broach as we 


creamed along on a two-sail - 

reach. “It’s very well be- . 
haved,” he shouted, almost 
disappointed at the boat's 
sure-footedness. “You’d have ^g|Sg|r 
to be bit of a cowboy to lose 

isairyandjmcluttered,helped 
deck head pillar in the galley 

area. Accommodation is for ■ ' - 

six, although four would be • 

Sigma 35 will break into the 
export tnarkeL One-designs 
are notoriously difficult to 
promote and support away ^ 

country. A successful CHS 

and IMS racer like the 35 . $ 

should be able to challenge ’'^K' IIIl ' 

Bdteteau- and Janneau yachts 

on their home ground. Mr 

limb hopes that 1991 produo 

tion will be around 40 boats, ^ 

half of them for export “A _ ■; 

boat tike a Janneau Selection q_ ^ 1 . ^ m 

is definitely a hairier racing 

machine, but don't forget says. “But we should lose 


JOHN REDMAN 


ft 






IMK 


pi 


you've got the hassle of round¬ 
ing up eight or nine crew every 
wedkend,” Mr Morrison says. 


Probably the Sigma's closest decided against running back- 


rival in the club fleets will be 
the Ben&eau. 35S5. “It’s 


lighter and would be quicker can be fitted if a dedicated 
than us downwind,” Mr Limb “tweaker” so wishes, a cus- 


On trial: the new Sigma 35, with Phil Morrison at the helm 

e should lose tomer choice of which Mr scaled-down America's Cup 
them in a breeze.” Morrison approves. with all the dip-pole gybes and 

In the interests of simplicity His final view of the Sigma so forth,” he says. “You can 
and rig safety. Sigma has 35 was that it was exactly the imagine^that you're Dennis 
t running back- kind of well-made toy that Conner.” 
e mast comes affluent grown-ups should KEITH WHEATLEY 
gS So that they have, and nol so demanding * The Sigma 35. in readv-to- 
if a dedicated that only a muscular racing race state, costs £53.-50 plus 
wishes, a CUS- expert could sail it “This is VAT. Delivery from early 1991. 


to race again 

WHAT does one do with America's Cup yachts once their 
racing days are over? 

Owners of the famous pre-war J-Class yachts, such as Sir 
Thomas Sopwith. stripped them of their lead and left them to rust 
away in mud berths on the Hamble river until a future 
generation came along to resurrect them. 

Smaller 12-metre yachts do not yet share the same classic 
status. Alan Bond's Australia II, the wing-keeled wonder that 
broke the longest sporting run in history, may have pride of 
place in a museum of Cup memorabilia at Fremantle, but with 
few exceptions, the remainder have been left, forgotten, to 
gather dust and rainwater in sheds around the world. 

White Crusader, Britain's challenger in the 1986/7 Cup series, 
might have suffered a similar ignominious fate, had Bichard 
Matthews not had the imagination to see other possibilities 
when confronted with the boat in a part-exchange deal against a 
new 68ft Oyster sailing cruiser, now nearing completion for 
Graham Walker at Peter de Savary's yard in Falmouth. Instead of 
having her smelted down for beer cans, the east coast 
yachtsman converted the 65ft yacht for his own use. 

Now fitted with an engine, lifelines and the bare essentials 
below. Crusader is the largest competitor to race at Cowes this 
year. 

"Not everyone has the chance to sail on an America's Cup 
yacht. I just wanted to have some fun," says Mr Matthews, who 
has already won line honours in two east coast races and 
hopes to do the same this week. 


stays. Bur the mast comes 
fitted with tangs so that they 


with all the dip-pole gybes and 
so forth," he says. “You can 
imagine that you're Dennis 
Conner.” 

KEITH WHEATLEY 

• The Sigma 35. in ready-to- 
race state, costs £53.250 plus 
VAT. Delivery from early 1991. 


Nicole S^ngley survived storms and saw dolphins during the Two-Handed Transatlantic Race. She wants to do it again 


Once is just 
not enough 

ossine the finishing which international- sailing 
ine at Newport, Rhode superstars in their 60-fooiers 
ciand and completing and amateur competitors in 
wo-Handed Trans- much smaller craft are equally 
. Race about 28 days, eligible for enuy. 
re and 12 minutes after Among the rivals of my 
Plymouth this sum- colleague Nigel Row and 
a moment I will never myself werea fi n a n cial consul- 
Yet this classic four- tant, accountant, fellow 
race otganised by the journalist; actoi;. chartered 
A^ern Yacht Gub, is surveyor and a former and his 
threat of extinction wife; ati non-professional sail- 
„ Q <- of'Spoor ors with a sense of adventure. 

' Apart from the.sailing, it is 

rally the event’s pos- the camaraderie and friendly 
25* comes at a time rivalry that-draw.many to this 
dvknces in navigation particulareveot-.Yet^Ithough 
I«tv make the race more women are getting afloat 
nScsible to a growing these days, the numbers of 
■ nf experienced ama- those attracted by. the Irans- 
?nr unlike other yacht atlantic. races, both 
°!V V 11 -rwo-Handed singlehanded and- twohand- v 
fcmiic is an event in ed, remain remadrahly tow. Of 



Friendly rivalry: Nicole Swengley aboard Piper Rising 


74 competitors who set off this 
time, only seven were-women. 
- Perhaps one reason for this 
is the lack of home comforts 
aboard- The daily‘shower or 
bath becomes an occasional 
strip-wash on deck; the flush 


lavatory is replaced bv a 
builder's bucket. Sleeping in 
short snatches, three hours on 
and three off throughout the 
night, may nol appeal to some, 
while others might object to 

the lack of fresh food. 


Living in a capsule smaller 
than the average bathroom 
means total lack of privacy. A 
long passage is demanding 
and relentless: if you argue 
you cannot walk away. 

Cooking during a gale 
proved nearly impossible and 
sleep out of the question. 
Moving around inside the 
boat, sometimes at an angle of 
45 degrees or more, meant 
lurching from one band-hold 
to another like a zoo-caged 
chimpanzee. We would be 
carried to the top of 20ft waves 
only to be lipped over their 
crests to crash into steep-sided 
ravines. Sometimes the waves 
would break over the boat, 
rushing tons of water across 
the deck. 

However, for every day that 
the weather scowled, there 
were several more when it 
smiled on us. Days when the 
sun shone from dawn to dusk 
and the breeze drew us swiftly 
across a softly undulating sea. 
Days when dolphins joined us 
for breakfast. Days when 


kneading a fresh loaf of bread 
in the cockpit was more of a 
pleasure than a chore. 

It was for times like these 
that we lived and lhe best was 
the last day of the race, ending 
our four-week passage on the 
highest of notes. We wished 
we could have re-provisioned 
the boat and sailed off again. 

Mixed weather and mixed 
fortunes meant we were one of 
only 26 to finish. Along the 
way 11 boats withdrew with 
problems ranging from gear 
failure or dismasting to suffer¬ 
ing such severe damage and 
leaks that one boat was aban¬ 
doned with the crew taken off 
by helicopter. Others limped 
back to Europe or up to 
Canada. 

Since our return the ques¬ 
tions most frequently asked 
have been: Are you still speak¬ 
ing to each other? Was it 
worth it? Did you enjoy it? 
Did either of you get scared? 
Did you argue? Would you do 
it again? 

To all of the above, yes. 


■ TIMED to coincide with 
Cowes Week, Imray Laurie 
Norie and Wiison. the chart 
publisher, has produced a 
coloured cruising guide to 
the tricky waters surrounding 
the Isle Of Wight. Written by 
Derek Bowskill. The Solent 
(£19.95) will prove an 
invaluable companion to rock¬ 
hopping newcomers 
attempting to cheat the tides, 
as well as to cruising coves 
whose prime interest is to beat 
the river bustle and explore 
the charms of Newtown River, 
Wootton Creek. Bembridge 


and other quiet anchorages. 
■ Tom McCieans madcap 
crossing of the Atlantic in a 
bottle continues. After 
setting out from New York on 
July 10, reports this week 
suggest that he has drifted 
past the halfway mark. - TH 
be happy to be home." he 
radioed. Despite the four- 
poster bed that fills his ■ 
cylindrical chamber, he 
complained: "The ride has 
been none too comfy," 
adding with charactenstic 
optimism: "But I hope to be 
in Falmouth by August 15." 



Powerboat sty le: the Rim Aquarama Special 

■ YES, this is the £220.000 Riva Aquarama Special that 
should have been seen speeding across this page last week. The 
powerboat shown was not exactly an imposter: she was the 
latest Riva 60, costing £1.5 million (to be featured in a later issue). 
To the first 25 readers who pointed out the slip, we are 
sending a copy of the latest Riva catalogue, itself a collector's 
item.- 



















JJb 


32 MONEY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Executive Editor David Brewerton 


BUSINESS 


Job figures prompt interest rate speculation 



es as oil 


recession 


Dealers 

await 

embargo 

decision 


From John Durie in new york 


By Martin Barrow 


AMERICAN financial 
markets were in turmoil 
for the second successive 
day yesterday amid a 
growing realisation that 
the invasion of Kuwait 
would force the American 
economy into a recession. 


Wall Street plunged by 
more than 100 points to just 
above 2,760 points at lunch¬ 
time in New York, triggering 
automatic suspensions of pro¬ 
gram deals as billions of 
dollars were swapped into 
American bond markets. 

Spot oil prices Jumped by 
$2.59 a barrel to $25.70 for the 
West Texas Intermediate 
amid speculation on oil fu¬ 


tures markets. This is a $10 
increase since June 20. Peter 
Butel, vice-president of Mer¬ 
rill Lynch, said: “This is one of 
the craziest days I’ve ever seen 
on the market. There is simply 
pandemonium and no one can 
safely say just where prices 
will end.” 

The impact of Iraq's con¬ 
quest was magnified by July 
employment figures in Amer¬ 
ica well below expectations. 
Unemployment rose from 5.2 
to 5-3 per cent and employ¬ 
ment in the month dropped by 
57,000 jobs against estimates 
of an increase of 120,000. 

The bond markets expected 
the employment data produce 
an early cut in interest rates. 


But the Federal Reserve Board 
indicated in hs market opera¬ 
tions that it would wait until 
next week at least before 
cutting the overnight funds 
rate from 8 per cent. 

Dick Berner, an economist 
with Salomon Brothers, said; 
“While the employment fig¬ 
ures are not always a reliable 
guide, the bottom line from 
the figures is that the US 
economy is very weak and this' 
will increase the Fed’s bias 
towards cutting interest rates 
further.” 

Darwin Beck, an economist 
at First Boston, said: “It is 
highly likely the Fed will cut 
rates by at least another 0.25 
per cent before next week’s 


Bank to clarify freeze 
order on Kuwaiti assets 


By Graham Searjeant 

FINANCIAL EDITOR 


THE Bank of England has 
acted swiftly to defuse prob¬ 
lems in the financial markets 
arising from the freezing of 
Kuwaiti assets on Thursday. 
On one estimate, about £300 
million of banking and foreign 
exchange deals, as well as 
share trades, may have been 
left uncompleted. 

Bargains entered into on the 
money, foreign-exchange and 
securities markets before 3pm 
London time on Thursday, 
when the freeze notice was 
issued, will be exempted. The 
waiver includes instructions 
for immediate payment invol¬ 
ving Kuwaiti institutions. 
Deals on the gold and commo¬ 
dity markets should also be 
covered by the Bank's move. 

The waiver follows consul¬ 
tations showing no evidence 
of unusual activity or that the 
Iraqi invaders had been able 
to manipulate funds before 
the freeze. AH other trans¬ 
actions involving the Kuwaiti 
government or residents, in¬ 
cluding future arrangements 
for people with bank accounts, 
mortgages and other contracts 



Sir Adam Ridley: grateful 
requiring payments, will re¬ 
quire approval from a special 
unit at the Bank. 

A helpline has been set up 
for companies or members of 
the public on 071-60I 3309. 

A detailed order on the im¬ 
pact of the freeze and arrange¬ 
ments for future business will 
be issued next week. Priority 
will be given to Kuwaiti 
citizens in London who may 
need to withdraw funds. 

Sir Adam Ridley, a director 
of Hambros, which had £6 


million of uncompleted deals 
involving Kuwait, said: “We 
are very grateful to the Bank. 
The notice takes us a very long 
way down the road to resolv¬ 
ing these problems.” Some in¬ 
stitutions could still have in¬ 
ternational transactions open 
requiring permission from 
other governments which im¬ 
posed a freeze, he said. 

The Kuwait Investment Of¬ 
fice (KiO), based in London, 
has also taken action to stop 
its assets being plundered, es¬ 
pecially where there is no legal 
freeze, including Switzerland. 
The KIO has instructed bro¬ 
kers world-wide that anybody 
trying to sell its assets will be 
doing so iliegallly. 

Dollar buying dried up as 
events in the Gulf quietened. 
The currency closed down half 
a pfennig at DM1.5929 in 
London. 

The pound, by contrast 
regained some of its petro¬ 
currency characteristics, dos¬ 
ing up 0.3 at 94.2 on the trade- 
weighted index. Sterling rose 
60 points to $1.8560 and 0.78 
pfennigs to DM2.9577. 

The FT-SE 100 index closed 
down 19.9 points at 2,284.6. 


auction of$30.3 billion in new 
Treasury bonds. The employ¬ 
ment figures show a weak 
economy and the Fed will 
probably not wait until next 
week’s PPI figure before cut¬ 
ting rates.” 

Last month, the Fed cut its 
overnight funds rate from S.25 
to 8 per cent, the first interest 
rate cut this year. 

The invasion of Kuwait was 
taking precedence on the stock 
market David Hale, an 
economist at Kemper Finan¬ 
cial Services, said: “It is now 
clear the US economy is 
moving quickly to a recession 
as oil prices of $25 a barrel will 
take between 1.5 and 2 per 
cent off GNP.” 

In the year to June, Ameri¬ 
can GNP grew at just 1.2 per 
cent and early estimates for 
third quarter growth had 
pointed to 1.5 per cent 

Mr Hale said: “The Fed is in 
an unenviable position as it 
wants to cut interest rates, but 
the oil price rises will simply 
fuel inflation while cutting 
consumer spending,” 

The American oil industry 
was in confusion over just 
how the government would 
interpret its freeze order on 
Iraqi assets. The order on one 
reading says all Iraqi oil will 
be frozen even if American oil 
companies have already paid 
for their supplies. 

The main oil companies 
spent yesterday negotiating 
with the government, trying to 
have the orders clarified so 
that only new orders or those 
not paid for will be frozen. 

The United Slates imports 
half its oil needs and while its 
stock levels are hi g h , about 65 
per cent of oil imports are 
based on spot prices, which 
means any price increases 
quickly pass on to higher 
petrol prices. 

American petrol prices have 
risen by eight cents a gallon 
since Iraq invaded Kuwait. 

The proic in the financial 
markets is due to its confusion 
over what moves Iraq will 
make next and bow long oil 
prices will remain high. 


Leading article, page 11 
Stock markets, page 34 
Kenneth Fleet, page 35 


OIL prices remained volatile, 
affecting share prices and 
currencies, as traders awaited 
the outcome of weekend talks 
between Western govern¬ 
ments. These are exported to 
result in a trade embargo 
against Iraq, including oiL 

In London, the price of 
September Brent approached 
$23.50 a barrel in late trading, 
against a closing price of 
$22.25 the previous day, after 
a strong opening in New York. 

But with dealers waiting for 
a decision on the possibility of 
sanctions against Iraq and an 
embargo of Iraqi oil, Brent 
crude failed to test Thursday’s 
highs of almost $24 a barrel. 

Opec ministers ruled out an 
emergency session but reaf¬ 
firmed their intention to en¬ 
sure that quotas agreed last 
month in Geneva were en¬ 
forced. Ginanjar Kartasas- 
mita, Indonesia’s energy mini¬ 
ster, said in Jakarta: “Opec’s 
agreement still exists, what¬ 
ever happens, and I expect 
Opec countries to stick to their 
quotas. 

“It should not be thought 
that we are happy with good 
prices because of the conflict 
We want goodoil prices but as 
a result of adherence to the 
Opec agreement to maintain 
stable oil prices beneficial to 
both consumers and 
producers.” 

In Tokyo-, shipping officials 
said Japanese ship owners 
may impose an industry-wide 
restriction on entry into the 
Gulf 

The Japanese finance min¬ 
istry has asked bun Its and 
securities companies to make 
strict checks 'on any requests 
for withdrawals or transfers of 
money from the Kuwaiti gov¬ 
ernment or its affiliated agen¬ 
cies, said Masarai Kogayu, the 
vice finance minister. 

West Germany will freeze 
all Kuwaiti assets to prevent 
Iraq from seizing them, say 
government sources. Govern¬ 
ment guarantees on exports to 
Kuwait will also be 
suspended. 

The American Customs 
Department seized 312,000 
barrels of Iraqi erode oil at the 
port of Texas, responding to 
an executive order banning 
trade with Iraq. All oil imports 
from Iraq will be seized. 



Bril 

Midi 


hall* 

for] 


Stephen Adamson, joint administrator, patting proposals for the survival of 
British & Commonwealth Merchant Bank to creditors yesterday 


Creditors of B&C bank 
‘should get their money’ 


By Angela Mackay 


CREDITORS of British &' 
Commonwealth Merchant 
Bank, pan of the collapsed fin¬ 
ancial services group. British 
& Commonwealth, were told 
yesterday by the bank's 
administrators that they 
would probably recover all the 
money owed them. 

A meeting attended by 
about 200 creditors approved 
proposals for the bank’s future 
prepared by the administrator, 
Ernst & Young. Their agree¬ 
ment also triggered payment 
to depositors under the Dep¬ 
ositors Protection Scheme, 
which will be liable for be¬ 
tween £30 million and £50 
million according to the ad¬ 
ministrators. Depositors will 
be able to claim 75 per cent of 
their deposit, up to a maxi¬ 
mum of £15.000. 

Stephen Adamson, the joint 
administrator, said that he 


was “quite optimistic” that 
the bank would be sold within 
a few weeks. An information 
memorandum had been sent 
to .30 interested parties and 
several — including some for¬ 
eign institutions — were now 
serious potential purchasers. 

Analysts at Laing & Cruick- 
shank, the stockbroker, stud 
that the bank was likely to 
fetch about £90 million. Mr 
Adamson said that if it were 
not sold within a reasonable 
period, a scheme of voluntary 
arrangement would follow. 

A creditors’ committee of 
five was formed of represent¬ 
atives from the Depositors' 
Protection Scheme; Midland 
Bank, standing-for creditor 
banks; Stock Group, repres¬ 
enting intermediaries; and two 
depositors’ representatives 
from the Sevenoaks local 
authority and the London 


Housing Foundation, a 
charity. 

Mr Adamson said that the 
bank had' net reserves of 
almost £90 million, which 
“should ensure every creditor 
is paid in full” . 

BCMB reported unaudited 
pre-tax profits of £L373 mil¬ 
lion m 1989, against £4.7 mil¬ 
lion previously, after prov¬ 
iding for an exceptional item 
- of £5.2 million relating to local 
authority loan swaps. In the 
six months to June3Q. it made 
pre-tax profits of £1.9 million 
after an extraordinary lossof 
£460,000 was attributed to the 
cost of transferring its forward 1 
swaps book to Barclays Bank, j 

Thebank’s assets stand at 
£409.5 million, of which £218 1 
million is in the loan book and! 
£100 million is cash. Liabil¬ 
ities of£319.7 mtifion include 
deposits of £282 million. 








THE POUND 


US dollar 
1.8560 (+0.0062) 

W German mark 
2.9557 (+0.0050) 

Exchange index 
94.2 (+0.3) 


L 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1793.4 (-180) 

FT-SE 100 

2284.6 (-19 9) 

New York Dow Jones 

2770.30 (-94.30)* 

Tokyo Nikkei Avge 

29515.76 (-729.42) 

Closing Prices ... Page 37 


INTEREST RATES 


London: Bank Base 15% 

3-month imetaank 15-14 ,6 *% 
3-month eligible bills 14Vl4 s u% 
US: Fnme Rale 10% 

Federal Funds 8%’ 

3-month Treasury Bills 7 27-7 25%* 
30-year bonds lO^ai-UCia' 


CURRENCIES 


London: 

£: Si.8560 
E. DM2 9557 
E S«Fr2 5056 
£ FFr98962 
£: Yer278 07 
S. index 94 2 
ECU £0 699614 
£: ECU1 429359 


New York: 

£ Si 8580- 
$ DM15915’ 

S S-.vFri 3498' 
S FFr5 3340' 

£ Veni4v3Q- 

S Indei&lo 
SDR £0 737371 
£. SDR1 356159 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 

AM S375 30 pm-S379 00 
close S377.75-378 50 (£203 50- 
£04.001 
New York: 

Comex S378 70-379.20' 


NORTH SEA OiL 


Brerrt (Sep).S23 OObbl i J 22 25) 

* Denotes latest trading price 


TOURIST RATES 


Australia S 


Austria Sch- 2] 60 

Belgium Fr_ 

Canada S -- 

Denmark Kr __ 

Finland Mkk ..._ 

Franca Fr 


___/Dm 

Greece Dr-.. 

Honq Kong S ___ 

Ireland Pi_ 

Italy Ure - 

Japan Yen _.. 

Netherlands ©d_ 


Portugal Esc.. 

South Afnea Rd.. 

Spam Pta__, 

Sweden Kr_... 

Switzerland Fr 
Turkey Ura.........._ 


USA! 


Bank 

BanK 

Buys 

Sens 

Z475 

2315 

2160 

2030 

6370 

S3 70 

232 

210 

U 77 

nor 

730 

690 

1031 

971 

308 

£90 

MS 

230 

M53 

1 063 

1500 

14 10 


2120 

292 25 

276 25 

345 

326 

1155 

7125 

270 SO 

255 SO 

560 

500 

188 75 

176 75 

ll 2J 

1054 

262 

2 J6 

5190 

47lW 

191 

1335 

25 CO 

1900 


Rates iw small denomraicm bar* only as 
suppliMoy Barclays Bar* PLC Different 
raws apply lo inkers' cheques. 

Ret&d Pnoe Index: 126.7 (June) 


** * *** 


Hughes Food passes final payout 

•*- IL ANDY WATTS 


By Our City Staff 


HUGHES Food, the fish 
processor and cold store op¬ 
erator, is passing the final 
dividend after suffering a fall 
in pre-tax profits from £3.91 
million to £3.67 million dur¬ 
ing the year to the end of 
March and charging extraor¬ 
dinary losses of £2.66 million 
for rationalisation costs. 

The absence of a final 
dividend reduces the total 
from 1.5p a share to 0.25p. 
payable from earnings of 4.1 p 
a share (5.2p). The shares 
traded unchanged at IS'/jp. 

The Grimsby-based com¬ 
pany was adversely affected by 
an uncertain fish market and 
disruption caused by ration¬ 
alisation of the food supply 
division, which saw profits 
before tax and interest fall 
from £1.3 million to£500.000. 

Profits from lbod services 
fell from £2.5 million to £1.6 
million, but machinery and 
construction activities in¬ 
creased their contribution to 
£2.4 million (£1.6 million). 

Interest charges rose from 
£1.5 million to £1.9 million, 
although year-end borrowings 
were £20.3 million (£25.78 
million). 



Uncertain mar ket: Andy Johnson, financial director, and John Hughes, chairman 


Bond sues four main 
shareholders in BSB 


By Our Media Staff 


BOND Corporation, the trou¬ 
bled flagship company of Alan 
Bond, the Australian business¬ 
man, issued a writ yesterday 
against the four main share¬ 
holders in British Satellite 
Broadcasting, claiming dam¬ 
ages for breach of express and 
implied contractual obliga¬ 
tions. 

Once the biggest share¬ 
holder, with 34 per cent, Mr 
Bond’s stake has fallen to 7.5 
per cent Last week he foiled to 
keep a deadline agreed with 
the four major shareholders to 
sell his stake to a party 
agreeable to them. 

The writ is issued jointly 
against Pearson, Granada, 
Reed International and Char- 
geurs of France, which each 
own about 21 percent of BSB 
Holdings. They refused to give 
Mr Bond an extension. 

Last night the four issued a 
joint statement that said Mr 
Bond had “twice acknowl¬ 
edged in recent months, in 
legally binding contracts, that 
he had no claims whatever” 
against them. “The proceed¬ 
ings will be firmly resisted and 


we are totally confident, on 
tiie basis of legal advice re¬ 
ceived, that they will not 
succeed," the statement 
concluded. 

Despite three potential buy¬ 
ers for the stake, Robert 
Maxwell, Conrad Blade and 
Carlton Communications, 
none could complete the deal. 
Mr Maxwell is believed to be 
still interested. 

Mr Bond’s stake was diluted 
at the end of May when he did 
not take up his rights in a £900 
million refinancing p»pir^p> 
Despite the dilution, Mr Bond 
was given an extension to try 
to find a buyer from an agreed 
list of six potential purchasers. 

Bond Corp is involved in 
negotiations with its bankers 
and creditors to stave off 
liquidation. The next big test 
for die company wall be on 
Thursday when holders of 
Bond Corp’s convertible 
bonds meet to decide whether 
to gram a moratorium on 
interest payments and ap¬ 
prove the sale of Bond Brew¬ 
ing to Bell Resources, another 
Bond company. 


by falling 


From Lulu Yu 

IN HONG KONG 

WTNSOR Industrial Corp. 
Hong Kong's largest textile 
company, saw net profits drop 

13.4 per cent to HK5248 
million (£17.3 million) for the 
year to end-March, reflecting 
difficult conditions and weak 
markets for the clothing 
industry. 

Wuisor has been affected by 
high inflation, labour short¬ 
ages and smaller orders from 
major markets in America, 
Britain and Europe. Most 
textile and garment firms — 
which produce around 40 per 
cent of the colony's domestic 
exports — have seen squeezed 
margins cm into profits. 

Winsor’s turnover for the 
year fell 2 percent to HK52.33 
billion. Earnings per share 
were 95 cents( 110 cents). On a 
pre-tax basis, overall profit 
margin on sales of textile and 
clothing items was 8.5 cents 
per dollar (9.3 cents). 


Enter the Western Australian fraud squad 


Police find more dirt than gold 


By Colin Campbell, mining correspondent 


SALT (in tablet form) would have 
been very useful in the English heat 
yesterday. But in Australia, sail has 
become a dirty word. 

Ferilya Mines, a small Western 
Australian exploration company, with 
which a number of mining en¬ 
trepreneurs are associated, yesterday 
told the Perth Stock Exchange and a 
shocked mining community that it 
had called in the fraud squad. 

Detectives, it said, were examining 
initial assay reports from the compa¬ 
ny’s Karpa Spring gold prospect, 
northeast of Perth. In July, company 
assays showed a gold "content of 
between 22.4 and 28.1 grams a tonne. 

The announcement of those figures 
sent shivers of gold fever through die 
mining city of Kalgoorlie. Perth and 
finally London, for the average grade 
of Western Australian finds is around 
3 grams a tonne. 

Periiya’s discovery seemed to show 
that the days of the small-time 
explorer were far from over. It was not 

just the big and the great mining 


houses that could find gold. However, 
it now appears that the sandbags that 
contained the original dirt sent for 
assay might have been “salted” - in 
other words doctored. 

Karpa Spring was discovered in 
October by a group of private 
prospectors. The property lies south 
of the Great Northern Highway, is 
adjacent to two salt lakes, and has an 
emu fence running through iL 

The area’s potential was thought so 
high that a Perth-based syndicate 
bought in. Last month, Noranda 
mining group of Canada, one of the 
world's giants, said it was buying in. 

The Perth-based syndicate said 
Noranda had bought a 30 per cent 
stake for AS6.15 million (£2.63 mil¬ 
lion) and had an option until Septem¬ 
ber 11 on a further 20 percent for A$4 
million. The original prospectors- 
would retain a 5 per cent gross royalty 
on all production from Karpa Spring. 

On July 12, when the sensational 
grades and the Noranda deal were 
announced. Ferilya shares jumped to 


a high of 47 Australian cents. Yes¬ 
terday, its shares were suspended for 
the second time in five days. They last 
traded at 7 cents. In an announcement 
to the Perth Stock Exchange, Periiya 
said: “It is now believed that it is 
unlikely that a gold mineralising 
system exists within the area drilled.” 

Instead of re-proving grades of up 
to 28.1 grams of gold per tonne, 
follow-up drilling had found a highest 
grade of only 0.016 grams a tonne, it 
said. 

Det Insp Adrian Storm said: “It 
may be possible that the earlier 
samples have been interfered with.” 
He said that fraud squad detectives 
and a government mining expert 
would supervise further drilling, 
planned for next week. 

A field geologist working for Periiya 
said from Perth yesterday “It has been 
one hell of a week”. 

Ross Loulhean, mining analyst and 
managing author of the Register of 
Australian Mining, said Periiya's 
announcement was "a disaster for the 


Western Australian exploration and 
investment community and would do 
the^state's mining reputation little 

If Kaipa's assays have been sahed. 
it would have required a high degree 
of sophistication. The original srad- 
bap in which the assays were trans¬ 
ported could have been impregnated 
with a gold-nch cyanide solution. 
MUnt however, might have been 

w&ch would hfisiiysiat 

grade gold mineralisation in all l lof 
foe second and third phase holes. 
Coarse gold was observed.” 

n <* writing 

off Pertiya entirely. There might tea 
plausible explanation. But last night, 

were taking unuX 
interest m the drilling. • 

They too had heard foe orfomal 
a Periiya shareholder. 18 W 


Profit falls 
at Irish 
newspaper 
company 


By Phiup Pangalos 


INDEPENDENT Newspap- i 
ers, the Irish Republic’s big¬ 
gest newspaper drain, suffered 
a foil in pre-tax profits from 
lc£11.9 millio n to Ix£5.92 
million (£5.35 million) in. foe 
six months to end-June. 
Group turnover climbed from 
Ir£70.4 million to Ie£ 73.8 
milli on. 

Last time, however, the 
figures were , boosted by an 
exceptional credit of Ii£5.92 
million. 

The board has made a 
provision of Ir£1.5 million 
against foe company’s 20 per 
cent investment in Golden 
Grid, a UK-based company 
that promotes a computerised 
lottery game called Skill Bali. 
This was ofl&et by a Ir£1.32 
million gain on the disposal of 
foe company’s remaining 
snares in Reuters, malting an 

&<^ onal los ° f 

Operating profits advanced 
to Ir£8.45 million. However, 
foe group's investment pro¬ 
gramme increased interest 
payments fipm IfiE409,000 to 
u£2.35 millio n. 

Earnings per share fell from 
22.8p to I4.ip, although earn¬ 
ings excluding exceptional 
from I3.2p to 
I4.7p. The interim dividend is 
“{Proved from 4p to 4.5p. 

.The company said it will be 
having discussions with its 
raff and union represema- 

?- ves . over coming weeks 
fomed at immediately brim- 
c°*t structures into line 
wfo those offoe Press Group 

1 the n ^P aper group that “* 
SwnJSS* main 

implementation of d^t fn- y: 

i i 

The company said its Irish I 

ssars ° f 1 v 


i ;- 


fa '* 


I Zl ZSr 


£ 

r 

ahS^ h u^i f ' he 



By 

4:tUr..K5£: 

mcrsss»”-i 

;r.r.d and 
,-cst 
tfo-.icyic 3T a 
\cs2rcnay. 
Bishop. EM4 2 
Iv-r-ccd 3Arr 
no:" losirg rr 
r-juits. 

■‘We kao » 
Mnwass* pabi; 
foat w 

:<: iirr.cvrr cc 1 : 

nn Europe r. ^ 
managed a sum 
Europt'jn pry' 
r:ihon, zr,5 :. 
unabL* :n VriiK 
element i-- 
Bishor- 
BA !'3»sx ■ 
routes ue:c. o 
basis, at 
higher tbar. .v 
making it rie: 
profit came fr. * 
Mr Bishr.p 
the Civil Av'.;*. 
to order B A r 
shuttle ser..;?j 
hearing ;s ?- 
October. 

“Wc be i; eve 
British A 
making n.inre¬ 
routes ce-uti ? 

able to 
uy or these 
”V»c che. -.-n: 

prove 
incurring 
Comrncr.Lr,? 
v-r.ues. Sr:uAh 
* Theo-2m.i Cl 
market i?;sM is 
pjT.scngrr r.-ntr 
are hcaiibv. 

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3.s a matter of 
break clmt a: 
roure ar- it is 

British Mriiii: 


ItS OAIt p'O r .i 

are mcrgtna 
Ba ol fiitodinj 
vi-jigow 

cjnaciiy. trad: 
factors for be! 

Thrtwoairi 
Jo sustain iartt 
if the\ 

e-.cn. the B* 
2 tided. 


G&B 


part 

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have >• 
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fourth 
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plant 
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ootal bid alert as Coats sales permit offer 



C ban 
mone 


I’rifiii 

4 

Vi T> *■-' 

nc^sp- 

—^ » **i 1 

cnii.s- 


ABiance: free to bid again 

British 
Midland 
challenge 
for BA 

By Harvey Elliott 

AIR CORRESPONDENT 

THE increasingly bitter battle 
of words between British Mid- 
■ land and British Airways over 
the cost of operating inland 
domestic air services intens¬ 
ified yesterday, when Michael 
Bishop, BMA chairman, chal¬ 
lenged BA to prove that it was 
not losing money on r the 
routes. 

“We know from British 
Airways* published accounts 
that in 1989-90 they achieved 
a turnover of £476 millinn on 
UK routes and £1,275 million 
on European routes. Yet they 
managed a combined UK and 
European profit of jnst £17 
million, and claim they are 
unable to break down the UK i 
element of this,” said Mr 
Bishop. 

BA lares ‘ on European 
routes were, on a pro rata 
basis, at least 30 per cent 
higher than on UK routes, 
making it dear where the 
profit came from, he added. 

Mr Bishop has appealed to 
the Civil Aviation Authority 
to order BA to reduce Scottish 
shuttle services and a full 
bearing is scheduled for 

October. . 

“We believe the claim by 
British Airways that they are 
making money On UK trunk 
routes could be misleading 
and indicates- that they are 
able to break down profitabil- 
ity on these routes. 

“We challenge them to dis¬ 
prove our belief that they are 
incurring losses.” . , 
Commenting on its shuttle 
services, British Airways said: 
“The overall market is up, our. 
market share is up and both 
passenger numbers and yields 
are healthy. 

“We are making money, but 
as a matter of policy we never 
break down any individual 
route as it is commercially 
sensitive.” 

British Midland admits that 
its own profits on the routes 
are “marginal” and accuses 
BA of flooding the Heathrow- 
Giasgow service with excess 
capacity, leading to lower load 
factors for both airlines. 

The two airlines would have 
to sustain larger losses or raise 
fares if they were to break 
even, the BMA spokesman 
added. 

G&B buys 
part of 
Coloroll 

By Our City Staff 

THE receivers at Coloroll 
have sold part of the home 
furnishings group’s wallpaper 
business to Graham & Brown, 
the privately owned wallpaper 
manufacturer, for an un¬ 
disclosed sum. The sale is the 
fourth major disposal at the 
group in a fortnight. 

Graham & Brown has 
bought about half ColoroD’s 
wall coverings business, with 
an annual turnover of around 
£28 million. . ^ , 

G&B has acquired Colo* 
roll’s Blackburn factory and 
the jobs of the 137 employees 
there have been secured. G&B 
has also bought some of the 

plant and machinery from 

Coloroll’s Gainsborough fac¬ 
tory where the receivers made 
200 employees redundant yes¬ 
terday. . £ 

The acquislion is the first 
non-management buyout of a 
major Coloroll subsidiary and 
isexpecied to double G&Bs 
business, taking turnover to 
around £30 million a ywr 
after some of Coloroll’s busi¬ 
nesses have been discontin- 
SDavid Brown, G&B joint 
managing director, said there- 
are some export businesses 
that are not profitable. 

Bill Roberts, of Ernst & 
Young, the receiver, raid he is 
in talks with interested parties 
for all the remaining Coloroll 
subsidiaries, which include 
the glassware business at 
Chesterfield, the remainder of 
the wall covering business, 
and Edinburgh Crystal- 
To date, over £45 million 
has been raised from the sal® 
of subsidiaries. Coloroll went 
into receivership in June ow¬ 
ing more than £300 million- 


By. Colin Campbell. 

TOOTAL Group is once again on bid 
Riot now that Coats ViyeUa has 
“[rtoraied with instructions from the 
department of Trade and Industry 
and ; disposed of its British thread 
and a 20 per cent stake in 
Z ute *F ann ’ German thread 
ma nufac turer. 

t . J^ divestn i®nts, recommended by 
tne Monopolies and Mergers Com- 
mision, -automatically restore full 
^^Safcts.auached to Coats Viyd- 
la s 29.9 per cent holding in TootaL 
and gtvc Coats ViyeUa freedom to 
iwopose a fresh taireovex/merger if it 
-should so wish. 

; Sir David Alliance, Coats Viyella’s 
chairman and chief executive, would 
not be drawn on whether his group 
.was getting ready to mount a fresh 
md. 

Sir David still believes that the 
commercial and industrial logic of a 
merged Coats Viy dfa- and Tootal 
re mains, but says that he.is" not 


prepared to pay a “siUy price” for 
TootaL 

Coats ViyeUa has also extricated 
itsdf from having to reduce its 29.9 
per cent stake in Tootal to 9.9 percent 
—which it would have been obliged to 
do had it not agreed to the MMC 
recommendations. 

The cat-and-mouse game between 
Coats ViyeUa and Tootal continues. 
The two groups have bon in a love- 
hate state since their initially agreed 
merger was referred for an MMC 
reference in June of last year, after 
which, in December, they called off 
all formal talks. 

In May of last year, tiie two groups 
had agreed merger terras on the baas 
of one Coats share and £4 in cash for 
every Tootal share, valuing all of 
Tootal .at £395 million, and equiva¬ 
lent to _138.4p. There was a cash 
alternative of I33p a Tootal share. 

By late November, however, it was 
indicated in investment dudes that if 
Coats ViyeUa did proceed with a 
renewed offer for Tootal, it would be 


at a price less than that originally 
indicated. 

Neither side has ever formally 
commented about that development, 
but on December 20 Tootal formally 
raid that it had withdrawn from 
discussions regarding a renewed offer 
from Coats Viyella. 

Tootal added yesterday that, since 
that date, there has been no formal 
duscussions between the two sides. 

There have, however, been infor¬ 
mal talks between individuals — but 
in the higher ranks of both com¬ 
panies, the battle lines have long since 
been drawn. 

Yesterday, Sir David said: “We will 
not pay a siUy price.” 

Geoffrey Maddrell, Tootal’s chief 
executive, yesterday said: “Ifanybody 
wants Tootal, then they are going to 
have to pay for it. Nobody is going to 
take Tootal on the cheap.” 

Meanwhile, Coats Viyella’s 29.9 
per cent Tootal holding is valued in 
its own books at 65p a share. 

Tootal shares yesterday closed at 


79'Ap. up 2Vjp. Coats ViyeUa shares 
closed at 120p. down 2p. 

Mr Maddrell said that although his 
group had entered last year's talks 
with Tootal in good faith and with a 
degree of confidence, “as time has 
passed, the differences have become 
wider”. 

He said: “Our managers, many of 
whom originally asked ‘Well, how it is 
going to work? Who is going to run 
the show?', are now saying *We told 
you so*. 

“Meanwhile, we are all gening on 
with running our business in a climate 
which is difficult for the entire textile I 
industry.” 

Although both groups have inter¬ 
national exposure, sterling's strength 
is not helping home operations. 

Interim reports from both of the 
groups are due soon. Tootal’s is due 
out on October I. and Coats Viyella’s 
on September 13. 

The date of a new Coals bid for 
Tootal is not as easy to determine. Sir 
David is to go on holiday next week. 


— ( BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

Record white knight bid 
for Easterbrook lapses 

RECORD Holdings' £13.2 million while knight takeover bid 
for the privately owned cutting tools company Easterbrook 
Allcard has lapsed, leaving the Sheffield-based power tool 
maker with a 25.8 per cent stake in its former tatgeL The 
announcement means control of Easterbrook passes into the 
hands of James Wilkes, the engineering company, which last 
month won a court hearing over a disputed 10 per cent stake 
in the target. This allowed Wilkes to claim more than 50 per 
cent acceptances. 

Record has also announced a 13.3 per cent increase in 
interim pre-tax profits to £2.1 million for the six months to 
30 June. Turnover was down marginally at £13.8 million. 
Michael Mallett, c hairman , said he did not expect to see any 
improvement in demand while high interest rates persist. 
The interim dividend increased by 15 percent to l.lSp. 


to sell Mercantile 
• interim profit fall 


SG Warburg 
in Swiss deal 

SG WARBURG, the merch¬ 
ant bank, is consolidating its 
position in Switzerland by 
buying the other half of SG 
Warburg Sodilic, its capital 
market joint venture, for £33 
million. It is also selling its 
half share of Bank SG War¬ 
burg Sodilic, an investment 
manager in Zurich, to Merc¬ 
ury Asset Management, of 
which Warburg owns 75 per 
cent, for £22 mill ion. 


Williams has 
3% of Rolfe 

WILLIAMS Holdings’ pen¬ 
sion plan has emerged as a 3 
per cent shareholder in Rolfe 
& Nolan Computer Services, 
a computer software group. 
The announcement, made 
under the new disclosure 
rules, says Williams Hold¬ 
ings owns 80,000 shares. 
Michael Warburg, Rolfe & 
Nolan's chief executive, said 
Williams Holdings had been 
a shareholder for some time. 


-By Neel Bennett, banking correspondent 


BARCLAYS Bank is selling 
its Mercantile Credit .finance 


-for ns to invest in these 
businesses," he said. “A risk- 


house and ia searching for a averse banker is a lousy 
financ ial services or overseas banker who does not main* 


Requisition, after suffering a 
3i per cent slump in profits in 
the first half of the year. 
Mercantile Credit is expected 
to fetch about £200 million. 
Profits before Third World 


profits.” 

Despite the bad debts, 
Barclays’ figures were still 
better than many of the banks 
that have reported in the past 
week. Its dividend by contrast 


debt write-offs fell £262 mil- was raised only to 9.15p, up 12 
lion to £591 million, at the per cent but below the in- 


bottom end of City forecasts, 
because of a threefold increase 
in other bad-debt provisions 
‘to £458 million.' 

Sir John Quinton, chair¬ 
man, said: “ We feel our 
results are reasonable but they 
are less than satisfactory in 
relation to . our in tonal 
objectives.” 

Barclays is selling Mer¬ 
cantile Credit because it com¬ 
petes with branch lending and 
earns lower returns than the 
main bank. Mercantile 
Group’s profits halved to £17 
million between January and 
June because of increased bad 
debts and pressure on its 
interest-rate margins. 

The subsidiary has out¬ 
standing loans of £1.5 biQioa 
and £150 millian in net assets 
and is expected to raise more 
than £200 million in a dosed 
auction. The - disposal will 
leave Barclays’reserves strong 
enough to afiterd a £500 mil- 
lion acquisition.. 

Sir John said this could be a 
financial services company in 
Britain, whose sales force 
could sell savings products to 


creases at Lloyds and 
NatWest The bank’s shares 
fell 8p to 374p. 

Barclays’ Central Retail Ser¬ 
vices subsidiary, which runs 
. its credit-card operations, suf¬ 
fered a . loss of £12 million 
against profits of £19 million 
last time. Part of the downturn 
was caused by the cost of 
introducing an £8 annual fee 
on Barclaycard in May and 
la unching a Mastercard. 

Barclaycard said 700,000 of 
its 9 million customers had 
tom up and returned their 
cards since the imposition of a 
charge, in line with its fore¬ 
casts. About 400,000 had app¬ 
lied for the Mastercard. 

Profits fell by a third at 
Barclays de Zoete Wedd, the 
securities and corporate fi¬ 
nance arm. The bank blamed 
the fall in equity turnover, 
particularly the collapse of the 
Japanese equity warrant mar¬ 
ket at the start of the year. 

Overall, the group increased 
its income by 8 per cent to 
£2.9 billion. Net interest in¬ 
come came under pressure 
from an £800 million fall in 


Barclays’ 6 million customers, .non-interest bearing current 
The bank’s financial ser- account balances. 


vices division increased prof¬ 
its by 17 per cent to £98 
minion, due to a rise in life 
assurance and pension sales. 

Barclays is looking to ex- 


Income was outstripped by 
a 9 per cent rise in operating 
expenses to £1.87 billion. This 
pushed the bank’s cost-in¬ 
come ratio, the measure of its 


tend its European network. It efficiency, up from 63.7 per 
was narrowly beaten by Nat- cent to 64.3 per cent 


ional Westminster in the bid¬ 
ding for L’Europeenne de 
Banqtte in France. 

Bad-debt provisions in 
Britain readied £290 million, 
more than £1.6 minion a day. 


Profits were also inflated by 
£35 million from a fall in the 
bank’s pension contribution. 
Barclays has reduced its 
contribution after discovering 
a £1 3 billion surplus in its 



AMS in takeover talks 

AMS Industries, the troubled studio-equipment manufac¬ 
turer, has announced that it is in talks that may lead to its 
being taken over. A statement from the company said that, if 
successful, the proposed takeover would “bring some benefit 
of synergy to both parties". 

The announcement comes during a period of sharp decline 
in demand for the Lancashire-based company's digital audio 
hard disc products. Turnover in the six months to May 31 fell 
21 percent to £2.81 million. As a result, interim pre-tax losses 
increased nearly fourfold on last year to £375,000. There is no 
interim dividend. 


Lincoln back 
in the red 

LINCOLN House, the USM 
furniture group, has fallen 
back into losses after last 
year reporting its first profit 
for five years. In the six 
months to June the company 
made a pre-tax loss of 
£853.000, compared to a 
first-half profit of £165,000 
the year before. Again there 
is no dividend. Group turn¬ 
over fell from £10.3 million 
to £7.8 million. 


Charlton 
sale complete 

CONRAD Continental, the 
leather clothing and fashion 
accessories company, has 
completed the acquisition of 
Charlton Enterprises. Bobby 
Charlton's soccer and sports 
schools business. Mr Charl¬ 
ton, the former England and 
Manchester United foot¬ 
baller, has been appointed to 
Conrad's board. He has an 
initial five-year contract and 
will be paid £50,000 per year. 


Windsor chief resigns 

PHILIP Reid, who joined Windsor, the Lloyd’s insurance 
broker, in January, has resigned as chief executive, in 
circumstances described by the company as “amicable”. 

Mr Reid joined Windsor in what was seen as a key step in 
the group's diversification plans. Last December. Windsor 
took a 75 per cent interest in Commercial Holdings, a 
Sheffield-based financial services company that intended to 
establish a franchise network to broke commercial loans. 
However. Commercial went into liquidation at the begining 
of July after "substantial losses’*. This caused a £900.000 
write-down in Windsor’s investment in Commercial. 


Of this £97 million was for pension funds. 


British & Commonwealth, the 
largest single bank provision 
ever made against a British 
company. Many haul debts 
were caused by small busi¬ 
nesses formed since 1988,said 
Sir John. “Bnt it was still right 


In the first half last year, 
Barclays wrote off £263 mil¬ 
lion in Third World debt This 
year there was a write-back of 
£11 million. The bank sold 
£600 million of debt in the 
half year. 



Feeling the heat: Sir John Quinton, Barclays chairman, yesterday 


Grim numbers game in East Germany 


By Wolfgang MCtnchau, European business correspondent 


EAST Germany’s hopes, of and West Germany, which 
adopting a free-market system appear to have underesti- 


are suffering another hitch 
because many of its com¬ 
panies will not be able to 
install proper accounting sys¬ 
tems by end-October as 
planned. 

The Treuhandanstalt, East 
Germany's privatisation 
agency, said that there would 
be "considerable, difficulties” 


mated the administrative con¬ 
sequences and costs of Ger¬ 
man monetary union. 

The delays expected in est¬ 
ablishing accounts are partly 
due to the low priority at¬ 
tached to the problem by the 
East German government. A 
law to establish company 
audits has yet to be approved 


balance sheets for East 
Germany's 8,000 Volkseigene 


assets and liabities. East Ger¬ 
man managers confined them- 


Betriebe within a period of selves to providing statistics of 
only eight weeks. There are sales, raw material impuis and 


before East German com- by the VoDcskammer, now in 
paniiNe could enjoy this final recess. The situation will last 
blessing of capitalism. another five weeks. 

The admission highlights West German auditors are 
yet another miscalculation by daunted by the task of estab- 
the authorities of both East lishing opening Deutschmark 


only 6,000 auditors in West 
Germany, and the largest 
practice, KPMG Deutsche 
Treuhand-Gesellscbaft, part 
of the British Peal Marwick 
Mclintock, has had to deploy 
regional staff in areas as far off 
as the Black Forest to keep up 
with preparatory work. 

They face investigating East 
German companies that used 
to have a somewhat different 
attitude towards accounts. 


lishing opening Deutschmark There were concepts of profit, 


costs. The Treuhandanstalt 
says that most East German 
managers did not know the 
concept of “reserves” even a 
month after capitalism's ar¬ 
rival in the country. 

“How do you value a 
Trabant car?” asked Erik 
Sonnemann, a Berlin-based 
KPMG auditor. An East Ger¬ 
man company would prob¬ 
ably have paid some 17,000 
Ostmarks, but the car, consid¬ 
ered in West Germany a piece 


of rust even when new, will 
fetch almost nothing today. 

Auditors, unable to work on 
the historic-cost basis, need to 
establish the so-called recon¬ 
struction value of a company, 
the amount necessary to build 
an identical firm. 

Worse still, the example of 
the Trabant car highlights the 
possibility that West German 
auditors may simply arrive at 
the conclusion that East Ger¬ 
man companies are worth 
little, if anything. In that case. 
West German auditors would 
become East Germany's cor¬ 
porate undertakers. 


HK trade 
centre sold 
to BCIL 

From Lulu Yu 
IN HONG KONG 

HONG KONG Land, the 
colony's biggest landlord, is 
selling the World Trade 
Centre, a 44-storey commer¬ 
cial building, for HKS1.72 
billion (£119.25 million) in a 
bid to trim non-core assets. 

The buyer is Bond Corp 
International (BCIL). the for¬ 
mer Bond Corp offshoot taken 
over by Thomson Pacific, 
which is controlled by Stanley 
Ho. the casino tycoon. 

The deal is the first ac¬ 
quisition of a Hong Kong 
property by BCIL since the 
takeover. "The board of BCIL 
believes the acquisition repre¬ 
sents a unique investment 
opportunity to acquire a pres¬ 
tigious building in a prime 
commercial district in Hong 
Kong.” said Jackson Chang, a 
BCIL director. 

Alisdair Morrison, Hong 


BA joins 
Logica in 
software 
venture 

By Philip Pangalos 

BRITISH Airways and Logi¬ 
ca, the computer software 
group, have agreed to estab-' 
lish a joint venture that will 
provide software services to 
the air transport industry 
worldwide. 

Speedwing Logica, which 
will be 51 per cent owned by 
British Airways and 49 per 
cent by Logica, plans to start 
operating on September 1. 

It is expected to grow from 
about 30 people in the first six 
months to more than 150 
people over the next three 
years. Speedwing Logica will 
operate according to Logica's 
methods. 

BA has already sold soft¬ 
ware and services to over 130 
other airlines and commercial 
companies, and will provide 


Kong Land’s property manag- = togica £3i 
ing director, said: “This sale of 

a non-core central asset gives 1 mjmmum Ievel of *>*" 
the company greater freedom 
to pursue other investment 
opportunities.” 

The company, whose port¬ 
folio consists of some of the 
most expensive properties in 
Hong Kong, has been trim¬ 
ming its residential and non- 
ccntral assets since 19S6, in a 
restructuring that turned it 
into one of the most profitable 
listed firms in the colony. 

The World Trade Centre 
has a club and cinema. 


Shareholders lose out in new deal 


Management team buys Sock Shop for £3.25m 



Ittovfing ws Richard Boss and SopMe Minnan 


By Gillian BoworrcH 

THE assets of Sock Shop International, 
the niche retailer which was founded by 
Sophie Mirman and her husband Rich¬ 
ard Ross and which at one time was 
valued at more than £70 million on the 
USM, have been sold for £3.25 million 
to a new management team backed by 
Murray Johnstone, the Scottish financial 
group. The new company will be called 
Sock Shop Holding. 

Shareholders and creditors will re¬ 
ceive nothing in the deal After the assets 
have been sold off, BDO Binder 
Hamlyn, the Sock Shop administrators, 
are expected to put.the company into 
liquidation. 

The new management team is led by 
Juan Olaso, who becomes managing 
director. He was formerly managing 
director of Omega UK, the watch 
manufacturer. Barclay Douglas, a direc¬ 
tor of Muiray Johnstone Developments, 
will become finance director. A chair¬ 
man will be appointed shortly. As well as 
Muiray Johnstone, two businessmen 


who helped arrange the deal, Paul 
McGlade and William Fitch, will have a 
stake in the business. Mr Fitch will 
become a non-executive director of Sock 
Shop. 

In addition to the purchase price, 
Murray Johnstone has invested £3.75 
million for working capital The com¬ 
pany will have no bank borrowings and 
initially Murray Johnstone will have a 
controlling stake. Barclays Bank is 
expected to write off around £15 million 
of Sock Shop's debL 

The new management team has 
acquired 50 British shops from the 
administrators and has plans to re-open 
35 of the British shops which were dosed 
by the administrators in May. The 11 
French shops have also been purchased. 

Mr Olaso believes Sock Shop, which 
made a loss of £3.9 million in the six 
months to last August, may be in profit 
on a montb-to-month basis within 90 
days. He says the British market can 
support up to 120 Sock Shops and then? 
are plans for eventual expansion in 


Europe. The new team has no plans to 
re-enter the US market where Sock Shop 
originally incurred significant losses. 

No further redundancies are expected 
among the existing 200 Sock Shop staff, 
and the re-opening of the 35 British 
shops, which were closed in May, will 
provide a further 80 jobs. 

Miss Mirman, who has plans to go 
back into retailing, said last night: 
“Having been determined to remain 
with Sock Shop during the difficult 
period under administration, Richard 
and I are pleased that the future of the 
business is secured. We are obviously 
disappointed that the final chapter 
hasn’t brought an entirely happy ending 
and we hope that the dedication, honesty 
and commitment we have always 
endeavoured to provide to our products, 
staff and customers will continue under 
the new owners”- 

Feter DuBuisson, senior insolvency 
partner at BDO Binder Hamlyn, said the 
main purpose of the administration had 
been to find investors for the company. 


minimum level of software 
development business and 
rights to sell certain existing 
British Airways’ systems. 

The new company will de¬ 
velop systems for, and pro¬ 
vide staff resources to, BA as 
well as developing, selling and 
supporting software systems 
for the air transport industry 
worldwide. 

It will have exclusive 
marketing rights for the sys¬ 
tems it develops, and will 
build up a strong third party 
customer base. 

Initially. Bedford Asso¬ 
ciates. BA’s American subsid¬ 
iary which specialises in 
transaction processing facility 
(TPF) systems, will remain 
outside the new company. 
However, in IS to 24 months 
the possibility of bringing it 
closer together with Speed¬ 
wing Logica will be examined. 

David Mann, Logica's man¬ 
aging director, said: “The joint 
venture should enable us to 
capitalise on a formidable 
combined capability much 
more forcefully than either of 
us could have achieved 
alone.” 

Mr Mann estimates that 
turnover could reach £10 mil¬ 
lion in the next few years. He 
said the joint venture should 
make a small contribution to 
this year's profits, although 
more substantial benefits will 
come later. 

Mr Mann added: “We see 
the airline industry worldwide 
as an exciting sector. They are' 
all spending a lot more money 
on information systems.” 

British Airways shares rose 
3'/jp to I89p, while Logica 
finned by 3p to 2Q5p. 















MONEY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


WORLD MARKETS 


STOCK MARKET 


Nikkei ends below 
30,000 in second 

day of heavy falls 


Tokyo 

SHARES closed sharply lower 
yesterday for the second day 
in succession after Iraq's inva¬ 
sion of Kuwait on Thursday 
sent oil prices surging and 
raised fears of inflation and 
interest-rate rises. 

The Nikkei index ended 
2.41 percent lower and below 
30,000 points for the first time 
in three months. The Nikkei 
lost 729.42 points to dose at 
its day's low of 29.SIS.76, 
after foiling by 392.81 on 
Thursday. 

Some brokers referred to 
30.000 points as a support 
level, but, after it was 
breached in early trading, one 
said: “Ii is hard to know where 
the support is, if there is any.” 
Trading was light with many 
investors staying on the side¬ 
lines, awaiting further news. 

Turnover rose to 430 mil¬ 
lion shares against 400 million 
on Thursday. But one foreign 
broker said: "People are not 
ready to jump out of windows. 
It seems pretty relaxed.” 

Share index futures arbitra¬ 
geurs unwinding long cash 
positions sporadically spurred 
declines. More selling is seen 
before the expiry of September 
contracts on September 13. 
The market has already been 
adjusting to higher interest 
rates and the Middle East has 
extended this correction. 

The Nikkei was down by 4.4 
per cent on the week and 10.7 
per cent since July 19 when it 
started its recent slide. Prices 
opened lower after a drop of 
□early 35 points on Wall 
Street overnight 

A foreign broker said: "Wall 
Street was predictable. It is the 
oil prices that are of more 
concern.” Oil prices soared by 
up to 15 per cent on Thursday 
to their highest level in four 
years. Japan is especially wor- 



Prices still tumbling: Tokyo floor-traders yesterday 


ried about the security of 
Middle Eastern supplies since 
it imports virtually all its oil, 
about 70 per cent of it from 
the Gulf. 

Ross Row bury, a senior 
broker at Sanyo Securities, 
said: "If the situation settles 
down over the weekend, per¬ 
haps next week investors will 
be back focusing on the 
American interest-rate scene.” 
A higher dollar would make it 
easier for America to ease 


interest rates. Investors are 
watching America closely and 
are waiting to see if events in 
the Gulf further intensify. 

Stephen Church, the head of 
research at UBS Phillips & 
Drew International, said: "If 
they do cross into Saudi 
Arabia, the situation is ex¬ 
tremely serious.” 

President Bush said on 
Thursday that America had 
not ruled out any option. 

(Reuter) 


Hang Seng steadies to end 58 lower 


Hong Kong 

PRICES steadied in late-after- 
noon trading, closing off their 
lows after market talk that 
Iraq was moving its troops 
towards Saudi Arabia faded. 

The Hang Seng index, down 
74 points to the day’s low of 
3.341 early in the afternoon on 


the talk, retrieved some losses 
to end 58.23 points lower at 
3,356.95. The broader-based 
Hong Kong index fell 38.42 
points to 2^209.27. 

Turnover eased to HK$1.88 
billion (£131 million) against 
HKS1.9 billion on Thursday. 
Cheung Kong was top of the 


active list, sliding 20 cents to 
HK$13.10, followed by Hong¬ 
kong Land, which, unlike 
most blue chips, gained. It 
rose 5 cents to HKS8.85. BCIL 
has bought the World Trade 
Centre, a Causeway Bay office 
building, from HK Land for 
HKS 1.72 billion. (Reuter) 


Dow drops 
63 points 
at start 
of trading 

New York 

THE Dow Jones industrial 
average dropped 63 points to 
2,801.6 in early trading. Blue 
chips tumbled, buffered by 
"worries about inflation and 
the sluggish economy. Falling 
shares outnumbered rises by 
five to one. 

American crude oil prices 
continued to rise because of 
Iraq-Kuwait tensions, while 
the United Statesemploymeni 
report for July showed surpris¬ 
ingly weak growth. 

The Chicago Board of 
Trade's Major Market Index 
August futures contract fell by 
its 20-point limit. 

Tom Callahan, the exec¬ 
utive vice-president at Yam- 
aichi International, said: 
"These things are in a free-fall. 
The specialists are not going to 
stand in the way and neither 
are buyers.” 

• Sydney — The market 
dosed sharply lower ahead of 
the weekend as nervousness 
and confusion because of 
Middle East developments set 
in. The All-Ordinaries index 
finished near its low at 
1,589.7, off 27.2 points, with 
most of the losses sustained in 
hectic afternoon trading. 

A Smith New Court broker 
said a number of factors 
contributed to the late foil, 
including a rumour that 
troops had been sent towards 
the Saudi border. A slump in 
the Japanese market and a foil 
in the futures also affected 
sentiment. 

• Frankfurt — Shares ended ■ 
1.5 per cent lower as worries 
about the consequences of 
Iraq's invasion and growing 
concern about the costs to 
West Germany of East Ger¬ 
man economic reform un¬ 
settled the market. 

The DAX index ended 
28.44 down at 1,840.94. above 
its low for the day of 1,837.12. 
The DAX has lost 78.87 
points, or 4.1 per cent, this 
week. Dealers said that British 
investors sold in low volumes 
early in the day. They were 
joined by other foreign op¬ 
erators later. 

• Singapore — Prices dosed 

broadly softer, but off the 
day's lows on late bargain- 
hunting in moderately active 
trading. The Straits Times 
industrial index fell 21.45 to 
1,511.05 after falling to 
1,505.72 in eariy-afiemoon 
trading. (Reuter) 


Bear raid by market-makers 
pushes brewery shares lower 


DEALERS may have been 
sizzling in the City yesterday 
as the heatwave persisted but 
brewery shares were flat after 
becoming the target of a bear 
raid by market-makers des¬ 
perately short of stock. 

In an attempt to obtain 
much-needed stock, market- 
makers took advantage of the 
nervous conditions to make a 
concerted effort to drive the 
sector lower. But their man¬ 
oeuvre had only limited suc¬ 
cess with few sellers appearing 
despite the losses. 

The brewers have been firm 
of late, underpinned by the 
hot weather which has made 
them struggle to keep pace 
with demand. Grand Metro¬ 
politan, a bigdoUar-eamer, fell 
21 p to 629p, upset by the 
strength of sterling. Allied- 
Lyons lost 6p at 50 Ip and 
Guinness fell 20p to 776p, 
worried about a downturn in 
the Japanese economy be¬ 
cause of the rising oil price. 
Both companies export hea¬ 
vily to Japan. 

There were- also losses for 
Bass, 21p to £10.75, Greenali 
Whitley, 3p to 346p, Scottish 
& Newcastle, 7p to 347p and 
Whitbread A, ISp to 445p. 

The rest of the equity 
market ended an eventful, 

BOCfeJl 17p to561p. 

Security Pacific Hoare Govett 
has reduced its forecast of 
pre-tax profits for the year to 
September, 1991 from . 

£410 million to £380 minio n. 

It blames currency 
fluctuations and a slowdown 
in growth. BOCs 
industrial cycle often la gs 
behind others in the sector. 


two-week account on a dull 
note. After trading in narrow 
limits for most of the day. 
prices went into free foil during 
after-hours' trading following 
an opening 6S-point drop on 
Wall Street Prices in London 
later recovered to close off the 
bottom. The FT-SE 100 index 
ended 19.9 down at 2.284.6 — 
a foil on the account of 115.1 — 
after being almost 31 points 
lower at one stage. 

The FT 30 index lost 18.0 at 
1,793.4. Turnover remained 
subdued with 523 million 
shares traded. Governmeni 
securities were left with losses 
of £1 at the longer end. 

Oils continued to hold the 
centre of the stage, helped by 
the firm crude price. BP rose 
3p to 364p with 17 million 
shares traded, while Clyde I 



[Share price] 




FTA AU-share 
price Max 
(rebased) 


f-I "* * " - Y ... v .. v ,....... | .. y Vj . v . vr , ■ r . -- . | f w n 

Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Fab Mar Apr May Jun Jut Aug 


Petroleum added 6p at 200p, 
Goal Petroleum 6p at 114p, 
Hardy Oil 13fep at 212%p, 
Lasmo I ip at 472p, Sovereign 
OB & Gas Sp at 209p. Triton 
Europe 16pat 182p, Ultramar 
8 p at 357p and Shell Ip to 
495p. 

Enterprise 03 was another 
firm market, climbing 7p to 
683p. There was talk this week 
that Atlantic Resources, 
which bought Tricentroi a 
couple of years ago, had been 
in talks with ICI and Elf 


Aquitaine, the French state- 
owned oil company, which, 
between them, own 50 per 
cent of Enterprise. But Paul 
Speckling, an oil analyst at 
Klemwort Benson, the broker, 
believes that the strength of 
the Enterprise price owes 
more to the oil price than to 
bid speculation. 

He said: "I think it is the oil 
price that is responsible for the 
strength of the sector and 
there is a little more to go. Oil 


WORLD MARKET INDICES ) 

DaBy Yew* Dolly Yeariy Dafly Yearly 
eh'ge ct»*ge cb’ge cti'qe efTne cft’ge 
Value {£) (E> W (to? 0«J) (OSS) 


The World 

651.2 

-2-2 

-224 

(free) 

124.2 

-2.2 

-23.( 

EAFE 

1143.1 

-2.1 

-26.< 

(free) 

117.0 

-2.1 

-27.1 


Nth America 
Nordic 
(free) 
Pacific 
Far East 
Australia 
Austria 
Belgium 
Canada 
Denmark 
Finland 
(free) 
France 
Germany 
Hong Kong 
Italy 
Japan 


-2.0 - 

17.7 

-1.5 

-1.4 

-3.1 

-0.7 

-1.7 

-3 J5 

-0.8 

-1.6 

-zs 

-1.7 

-0.7 

6.3 

0.0 

-0.8 

12.3 

-0.1 

-2.1 - 

25.7 

-2-1 


Netherlands 

826.3 

-3.1 

-12.6 

-3.1 

-5.4 

-25 

-0.4 

New Zealand 

82.6 

-0.8 

-19.9 

-0.8 

-7.8 

-02 

-7.9 

Norway 

1545.7 

-2.4 

15.2 

-2.4 

23.7 

-1.8 

323 

(free) 

271.6 

-2.4 

’ 16.3 

-2A 

24.9 

-1.8 

33.6 

Sing/Malay 

1875.2 

-1.7 

-6.0 

-12 

2.8 

-1.1 

8.0 

Spain 

219.9 

0.3 

-7.1 

0.0 

-4.6 

0J9 

62 

Sweden 

1729.6 

-0.6 

-1.4 

-0.6 

6.7 

0.1 

13.3 


(free) 

Switzerland 

(tree) 

UK 

USA 

(»c)- Local currency 


shares are still discounting $23 
a barrel” 

British Aerospace contin¬ 
ued to benefit from the con¬ 
flict in the Middle 'East. 
Brokers claim that even if 
there is an early settlement of 
the Iraq/Kuwait dispute, the 
other Arab countries will al¬ 
most certainly increase their 
defence spending. The price £ 
finish ed J 5p dearer at 579p. 

The insurance composites 
were a nervous market ahead 
of the start of their interim- 
dividend season, starting next 
week. Analysts are bracing 
themselves for some gloomy 
news from the insurers. They 
are expected to have incurred 
substantial losses from storm 
Hftmagg this year. 

Falls were seen u Commer¬ 
cial Union, reporting Tuesday, 

8 p to 477p, Royal Insurance, 

2 p to446p, Sim Affiance. 6p to 
303p, while General Accident, 
also reporting on Tuesday, 
firmed 2p to 5Q2p and Guard¬ 
ian Royal Exchange strength¬ 
ened a similar sum to 216p. 

During the day, Hawker 
Siddeley clawed back some of 
Thursday's sharp foil, stem¬ 
ming, from worries about the 
loss of contracts in the Middle 
East, but still finished Ip t 
cheaper at 544p. Analysts 

Midland & Scottish, an oil 
producer quoted on the USM, 
rose 18p to lS8p after a 
huffish review from BZW. 
Production from the 
Emerald Field wfli start next 
year and the group has 
raised eno^b money for a 
second rig, which wfll come 
on stream In 1993 and should 
double earnings. 


have pointed out that only 2 
per cent of the group's work¬ 
load is in the Middle East 

Interim figures from 
Hawker next month are ex¬ 
pected to show pre-tax profits 
down from £93 million to 
about £70 million because of 
losses in the contracting di¬ 
vision. GKN eased another lp 
to 361p ahead of its figures 
next week, expected to show 
halftime taxable profits foil¬ 
ing from £110 million to 
below £100 million with some 
forecasts as low as £90 milli on. 

The main downturn is be¬ 
lieved to be on the automotive 
components side which is 
being hurt by lower car 
production in troth the United 
States and Britain. 


Some: Morgan Stanfe? Captial International. 




ADCXJtl Lao 
Aetna Lit* 
Aruna rtson 
At prods 
Albertsons 
Alcan Al 
Aico Stand 



WALL STREET 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Michael Clark 


INTEREST RATES ROUND-UP 


Aug 3 Aug 2 
rmaoay dose 


Aug3 Aug? 
midday close 


56 Vi 56*1 
18S 19* 


Aug 3 Aug 2 
midday dose 


Cato Puts 
Soria Oct Jan Apr Oct Jn Apr 


Sarin Ang Ns* Pah Aug No* Fafa 


MAJOR INDICES 


New York: 

Dow Jones.— 2770.30 (-94 30)* 

Tokyo: 

Nikkei Average -. 29515.76 (-729.42) 
Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng.335695 (-41 62) 

Sydney: AO ....». 1589 7 (-27 1) 

Frankfurt DAX ..... 18*0.94 (-2844) 
London: 

FT -A All-Share ...... 112508 (-9.83) 

FT.- 50CT.- 1237 64 <- 11 22) 

FT Goto Mines..I989(-14| 

FT. Fixed mteiesi. 83.52 (-0 58) 

FT Go* Secs- 79.18 (-0 361 

Bargains . 27306 

SEAO Volume . 5234m 

USM iOalastreamj 136 24 (-0.14) 
•Denotes latest trading price 


MAJOR CHANGES 


RISES: 

Bnlisn Aerospace 

Bnnsh Borneo. 

Hardy Oil 6 Gas .. 

LASMO. 

Triton Europe. 

FALLS: 

LLoyds Abbey. 

Grand Met . 

Guinness. 

Whitbread "A . 

Sotoebys. 

Pnesi Manans ... 
Uld Newspapers 

WPP. 

Beazer. 

PMC Group. 

Closing prices 


.. 578'^p (+I5p) 

.755pH-15p) 

.. 2lSp (+16p) 
.. 472'Tp(+12pl 
_ 18r.?p(+16p) 

... 332p (-120) 
629’rp <-20’>pj 
... 775' . p (-20p) 

.445p(-l5pi 

. n5p(-75p\ 

.... 135p l-38pl 
334'.-pMJp1 
597’-:p(-18p) 
.. i52p (-10pj 
.... 657'..’p (-11 pi 


35*1 

22‘j I HwaAes 

35'. I Herjr*, Fd 
Har.ier 
H.i:on H«l 
H-toi* D-JCT 
HsnhKUHe 
HOW ■rt. <9 
Hjusion ind 
Hsenic iw 
Huxanx 


l^gsd-fu^d 
imars Steel 


inn Paper 

nr 

James River 
Jcteisn Jhsn 
k Man 


Ory* Enrgy 

52', 

52i: 

Pac Em 

3fl*i 

38:. 

Pac Gas Bsc 

22'. 

22’. 

Pac Tates 

41'.. 

«!. 

Paccar 

37'i 

39'A 

Facificrop 

20', 

201 

Pa« 

3D*. 

31', 

Paramount 

37'i 

38", 

Parker. Hanin 

25S 

26*. 

Penney 

54 V. 

55'v 

PennzOll 

84 . 

84*i 

Peosico 

73% 

75'. 

Pfizer 

70>, 

74 

Pimps Pm 

30', 

29*1 

PWdpa Elec 

15 J . 

16'i 

PMpMoms 

44-, 

46*. 

PWps Dodge 

66'., 

70 

PrtnevBow 

42!, 

42*. 

Pier Dome 

17', 

17’i 

PNC Foci 

25-; 

25’i 

Pnhffle Estn 

ia 

18’.- 

PrtaiOid 

55', 

36 *, 

PPG Incs 

51 -i 

£2', 

PrcIrGmoe 

78'; 

82'.. 

Pr>fe 

36 , 

33 

Pranenca 

31'a 

31 v. 

PuoSarvce 

25', 

25'.- 

Quaker Oaa 

45'; 

46'., 

Ralston Pit 

94-. 

50 

flaycnem 

24'. 

25'. 

Ravtneon 

W. 

60". 

Reehok 

14', 

15 

Roadway 

34'. 

36'. 

Rock**il 

27 

27 

Bonn Haas 

3 2 

33-; 

Rovai Dircn 

84', 

85'. 

Ruooermjxl 

39 , 

40'-. 

RynMs MB 

61*. 

65 

Sai-r. 

32 . 

33', 

Salomon 

23'# 

23*. 

Sant f* Pac 

19 

19', 

Sara Lee 

26', 

27'. 

Scnwrs 

20'. 

38. 

Smuinocr 

ifi\ 

65’-. 

ScJ'rgPicr 

46 ■ 

4° 

Scon Pacr 

46', 

45 

Seagram 

Hi: 

84-; 

Soars k: l . 

33 

32’. 

Secnv Pac 

29;. 

33'. 

Srvrwn A'lims 

37'# 

38'. 

Snap-on TIs 

34 , 

34*. 

Soumem 

2-T# 

25*. 

Sovran 


27', 

Si Paul 

»'V 

60', 

Stanley Wk 
Sion* Cnrr 

35'1 

14', 

35', 

14*. 

Sun Co 

35'.• 

35'. 

Sdntst 3s 

20 

20-. 

Super Valu 

27 v 

27', 

SVVBffl 

52 a 

54 

Svniev 

56 . 

59'. 

Svsc© 

33'. 

34'. 

Tandem 

*7 i 

M". 

Tandy 

35'. 

3f'. 

Teie-comm 

12’, 

13'. 

TeteOiiM 

Zl 

2»'» 

TompJe-in 

33'i 

34'-. 

Tervi'ec:- 

64 


Tej’co 

: 

66’. 

Te«as iro: 

M- 

30 . 

Teuas Uni 

37 

37'. 

Te»non 

r.*~. 

23 

rime wrrr 

£9 

90 i 

Times .'Am 

28 . 

28'. 

Timken 

Jl'. 

31 . 

Torcnnar* 

49-, 

SO'-. 

Toys ft US 

27'. 

26*. 

Tranwm 

33 . 

35‘. 

Travelers 

26*. 

27 . 

T'ic-jno 

40 

40'. 

TRW 

40 , 

41', 

T, m. Lab 

E6 

58'. 

UAL 

1 20\ 

130 

On C-imo 

37 , 

38'. 

Un Caituce 

18'. 

10'-. 

Un P.icri* 

77'. 

77’. 

Ur.lei«r 

K'. 

87'. 

Un.i.s 

«0 

10'. 

Unocal 

33 . 

33'. 

L'sitnn 


41'. 

USkvest 

35‘. 

37'. 

ijsair da 

20 . 

21”. 

U£-Aj 

:i. 

25 . 

US7 

. 

31 . 

US» 

35'. 

24 . 

Uld Tech 

55 . 

56 • 

UM Teton 

24 , 

24-. 

VF 

C3 . 

2» . 

WaJ JAari 

:y. 

JO 

Walijr eon 

47'-. 

49'. 

Wssre Mon: 

36'. 

40'. 

Wen; Parc o 

60'. 

sr. 

Utesio E'-rs 

33'. 

34* 

IV-yernsr 

jj'i 

23'i 

VMtortpoot 

25 

25 . 

RMran 

24'. 

24- 

Wmn-Di.io 

73 . 



25 

23-." 

Wt^ey 

54 

54'. 

ivmor^amo 

65'. 

68 . 

Aerov 

«5'. 

46', 


AULyoo — 

460 

65 

78 

95 

5 

10 

13 

C50IJ 

500 

33 

52 

66 

16 

22 

25 

550 

10 

28 

43 

47 

50 

52 

ASDA - 

100 

22 

27 

- 

T', 

4* 

- 

1*122) 

110 

15 

21 

23 

41, 

7 

9 

120 

9 

15 

18 

8 

11 

14 

Bus_ 

1050 

72 

95 

127 

19 

37 

42 

(-1075) 

1100 

44 

67 

100 

40 

60 

65 

1150 

23 

*7 

75 

77 

87 

90 

Bools.. - 

280 

29 

36 

47 

5S 

10 

11 

(*29S) 

300 

16 

24 

35 

13 

17 

18 

330 

5 

12 

20 

37 

38 

39 

8nSA*- 

200 

6 

11 

17 

r« 

IS 

19 

I'185) 

220 

2 

6 

9 

34 

34 

37 


240 

1 

3 

6 

54 

54 

57 

BP 

300 

65 

75 

82 

1 

3 

4 

[-3651 

330 

38 

51 

59 

4 

B 

10 

360 

IB 

30 

41 

16 

IB 

20 

Bril Steel—. 

130 

1113*,101. 

2 

4'.i 

5', 

1'135) 

140 

6 

61ZM 

6', 

91, 

10 

160 

1 

3 

5’, 

26 

26 

27 

CtW- 

500 

21 

40 

55 

30 

35 

36 

(*47B) 

550 

7 

20 

35 

71 

73 

75 

600 

2". 

9 

19 

121 

121 ' 

123 

Com Union— 

460 

30 

49 

59 

12 

17 

21 

(*477) 

500 

12 

27 

34 

36 

40 

44 

550 

3 

9 

16 

76 

70 

60 . 

Courtadd — 

327 

43 

_ 

- 

6 

- 

- 

C352) 

3 60 

20 

33 

46 

18 

21 

23 

390 

B 

20 

30 

38 

38 

40 

CRN - 

390 

10 

19 

24 

45 

39 

40 

C359) 

420 

3 

11 

IS 

66 

65 

67 

460 


- 

- 1 

108 

- 

- 

Grand Met— 

600 

65 

92100 

12 

15 

23 

(•631) 

650 

33 

60 

70 

32 

35 

42 


Cmmounded 
st tax rates iUnfom 
29% 40% Ima rt aa n te Ratios Contact 


220 

5 00 SO 

4V, 10 

73 82 

37 

» 

37 

5 

1-:- 

37 57 

7 

1H 

600 2 

15 33 

47 

49 


EXi 

V, 

4 

330 22 

360 5 

40 49 

22 32 

5 

22 

12 

26 


BANKS 

Ordinary Dep A/c: 
Typical 5.00 

Fixed Term Depo si t s: 
Barclays 10.81 

- 11.38 

Lloyds . 10-43 

* W92 

VBcBwhS 1048 

- - " 1038 

MstWest ID.S3 

" " " 1050 


none/hone 

25.000-50,000 
25.000-50,000 
2500-nomax 
2,500-no max 
10.000-no max 
10900-nomax 
10,000-24.000 
10,000-24.000 


I 071-6261567 
i 071-6261567 
i Local Bmcti 
i Local Bench 
071-2602805 
071-2602605 
071-7261000 
071-726 1000 


700 »2 35 47 65 65 68 

ICI-1000 47 65 102 38 «4 60 

IM0I2J 1050 23 fO 74 H 75 90 

1100 12 40 54 120 120127 
Kingfisher— 300 68 68 - 4 4 - 

1-3421 330 32 44 58 7 13 15 

350 13 37 39 25 27 31 

La (awoke— 300 25 35 45 9 15 16 

(-303) 330 II 20 29 24 29 30 

360 y, 9 17 53 53 52 

Land S e c.,.., 460 65 90 - 3 6 - 

(’5111 500 37 50 65 10 16 20 

550 12 K 40 43 <6 46 

MAS- 220 23 30 38 4!, 7 9 

1-2301 240 9 17 28 14 16 17 

260 4 9 16 29 31 31 

STC_ 250 IS 30 35 15 17 19 

(•2601 280 10 21 25 27 28 31 

300 4 13 is 42 44 47 

5e>n>bury_ 260 22 31 41 5 9 10 

1*284 ) 300 II 21 29 19 19 20 

330 * 10 17 45 46 47 

Si ell- 420 92 99 103 2 4 6 

(•4991 460 45 65 73 7 11 16 

500 19 40 47 23 26 30 

SmklBeech. 5P0 45 63 60 10 17 20 

(•5231 550 18 35 49 34 39 <0 

600 5 i» 28 76 76 76 

StorahEe_ 120 20 26 29 4 6 7 

ri34| 130 13 18 23 7 10 10 

140 8 12 18 12 13 16 

Trafalgar- 280 21 27 33 12 20 22 

I *2801 300 12 17 25 25 32 33 

330 3 8 - 53 55 - 

URnwnn- 300 68 80 88 3 6 8 

1*3581 330 42 » 60 7 13 18 

360 20 40 4B 23 25 28 

Unilever- 600 89 108 - 5 91. - 

(*672i 65048\fS’. - 1219'. - 

70017', 3? 58 35381, 40 

750 5'.-19S36v.-78';78l;78’. 

UldBtsc- 310 26 39 45 8 12 13 

(■3411 SCO rr 23 20 24 26 28 

390 4-, 12 15 50 40 52 

Serin Aug Nov Fab Aug Ns* Fab 


HIGH INTEREST CHEQUE ACCOUNTS 




Banket 

Scotia nd HUC 

10.45 

1097 

8.78 

2.5001 

none 

031-4427777 

Mma/c 

(L50 

9.84 

7.87 , 

23001 

none 

0604 252891 

Co-operirtiwa 

URra 

600 

&20 

436 

No mint 

nor* 

0716266543 

Girobank 

9J25 

9.25 

7.40 

1300t 

none 

051 966 207G 

UoydaMCA 

MktiandMCA 

700 

720 

5.78 

soot 

none 

071-3253336 

9-50 

9B4 

737 

JLOOOt 

none 

■I - 

NatWest 

Specun Reserve 

9.00 

9.31 

7.45 ' 

5001 

none 

071-374 3374 

Royal Bank of 

Scat Pram A(c 

9.75 

10.11 

B.09 

2300 

none 

031-556 8555 

TS8 (England A 
Wales) 

9.00 

' 9.00 ' 

730 

2.0001 

none 

071-6006000 



16 

24 

31 

4S 

E 

11 

220 

5 

M 

19 

IS 

18 

240 

2 

7 

11 

32 

33 

34 

_ 60 

8 

10 

13 

3 *'A 

5 

70 

2V, SY. 8M 

9 

9 

11 

60 

1", 

3 6V4 

1818* 

18 

► 357 

20 

35 

- 

9 

14 

- 

393 

6 

18 

- 

33 

33 

- 

429 

2 

8 

• 

70 

70 

- 

- 200 

30 

3b 

- 

2V, Vh 

- 

220 

14 

22 

30 

7 

12 

15 

2« 

5 

12 

30 

22 

24 

S 

?SC 

2 

6 

13 

40 

40 

42 

_ 180 

57 

bb 

- 

1 

1 

- 

200 

37 

4b 

49 

1 

2* 

3 

220 

IB 

79 

33 3* Vh 

b 

240 

5 

IS 

21 

10127,14* 

- 120 

SB 

3b 

- 

1 

Z 

- 

130 

19 

27 

31 

2 

4 5* 

140 

11 

19 

24 

5 

8 

10 

160 

3 

10 

14 

18 

30 

21 

_ 700 

107 

— 

— 

2 

- 

- 

750 

67 

83112 

10 

22 

27 

HOD 

30 

S3 

60 

20 

42 

47 

850 

14 .32 

55 

67 

72 

74 

_ 500 

60 

73 

90 

5 

12 

14 

550 

23 

38 

60 

7? 

30 

35 

600 

8 

20 

as 

60 

65 

67 

. 760 

18 

30 

39 

5 

9 

12 

280 

9 

16 

28 

14 

18 

20 

300 

3V, 

11 

18 

32 

32 

31 

- 236 

3b 

44 

- 

2 

3 

- 

755 

18 

31 

• 

« 

7 

- 

273 

9 

20 

- 

13 

16 

m 

780 

12 

23 

30 

TO 

25 

30 

300 

5 

12 

21 

40 

40 

45 

330 

7 

7 

12 

70 

70 

70 

- 200 

2v, 

70 

28 

6 

910* 

270 

4 

)'A 

17 

IB 

21 

27 

240 

1 

4', 

97, 

37 

37 

37 

90 

7>.10'i 

14 3r, 

6 

7 

100 

2V, 5S 

9 

10 

12 

13 

110 

1 

3 5A 

19 

19 

20 

280 

300 

S'.', 

15 

74 

25 

28 

27 

330 

2 6'.', 

13 

52 

51 

52 

700 

30 

63 

no 

14 

22 

25 

750 

14 

3b 

53 

40 

46 

48 

800 

4 

18 

34 

B0 

90 

92 

130 

11 

16 

IB 

3 

6 


140 

4 

10 

12 

9 

11 

12 

160 

1 

4 

6 

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7.25 

725 

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Srittania 

090 

8.90 

792 


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10.50 

10SO 

&40 


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11.30 

1120 

9.03 

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11.75 

11.75 

9.40 

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BJrndagham Bfid 

12-2S 

1225 

9.80 

10900 mm 1 year 

— 

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BwtraahamaOi 

1225 

1225 

9.80 

2500 min none 


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11.78 

1226 

990 

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1225 

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9.79 

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1210 

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Card Cash 

3.75 

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Regency Life 1030 1030 0.18 10.000 mW 3m vereceH 

Liberty Lite 10.60 1060 901 25,000 mm 4m 9714045766 

HB Samuel 1060 1050 092 . 1,000 mm 5 yrs ferdetafo 




































































































THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


MONEY 




LpmcKspur receiver 

faces; tangled web 
°f leases and deals 


a Correspondent . 
CONFUSONand frustration 

demise of™ 
pp&spat group, the printing 
supplierihat spec- 
in flexible leasing con- 
nTCts,wlucfa were favoured by 
Atomic Computers, the Brit- 
™ & Commonwealth subsid- 
* ar Y. no *\ in administrative 
receivership. . Relations .fee- 
$”*® Bhckspur’s receiver, 
Arthur Andersen, and the 
“TO* 0 * 5 of the company are 
reported to be cooL ' 

' “It is a massive exercise to 
find out who has got what 
equipment,” says Tony Brier- 
ley, the administrator.“We are 
. still pulling together informa¬ 
tion,” he adds. . 

i M r.Bnerley is involved in a 
legal wrangle over the validity - 
of Bteckspux’s tease on its 
Albert Road headquarters in 
Manchester. 

It appears that Blackspur’? 
"pension' fund bought the 
Manchester premises around 
the tune Blackspur was 
reorganised in Lao-1988. The 
lease agreement,. however, is 
said to date from this year.. 

The receivers were hoping 
to realise some value for the 
-base.- But if it provesto be 
invalid, Blackspur will be 
forced by its own pension fund 
to move out of its offices. 

- Until a few years ago 
Blackspur was limply a be tte r-, 
than ^average second-hand 
printing machinery dealer. It 
was restructured to form 
Blackspur Group pic. The aim 
was to pave the way for an 
: eventual flotation in a bid to 
mirror Atlantic's spectacular 
progress ten years previously. - 

In late-1987 the two 
foundas, Steve Kellar and 
John Glascy, were ap¬ 
proached by Vernon Davies, 
co-founder of Atlantic Com¬ 
puters, and Nick Tho mas. 
previously Adamic's UK sales 
director. This was shortly 
before B&Cs takeover of 
Atlantic. 

Mr Davies and Mr Thomas i 
took a. .SO per cent slake in : 
' Blackspur pic and Blackspur ; 
Graphics for £2.7 million. I 
They also acquired Blackspur 
Leasing for £1. By this time, . 
Mr Davie* lad resigned from 
the Atlantic board, fie later < 
became chairman of , 
Bfackspur. ‘ J 

At Atlantic, Mr Davies and - i 
his co-founder, : John 1 





Blackspor’s headquarters: legal tussle over lease 


- Foulston, had. invented the 
Q exlease, a lease that was in 
effect two contracts. The first 
consisted of a binding high- 
interest finance contract be¬ 
tween die customer and the 
bank, with Atlantic reserving 
the right to buy back tbe 
equipment at a nominal value. 
This provided Atlantic with 
cash up-front 

The second was a manage¬ 
ment contract, which allowed 
the customer to swap, upgrade 
or walk away from die lease at 
pre-set dates. Should the cus¬ 
tomer want to walkaway from 
the lease, Atlantic undertook 
to pay the test year’s instal¬ 
ments tO the bank. 

' The flaw in -the whole 
scheme was that more and 
more ftexleases had to be 
written so that the extra front- 
end cash generated could be 
used to cover the back-end 
debts of earlier deals. 

Blackspur’s leases were 
modelled on -the- ramp prin¬ 
ciples. However, many of its 
customers, .small commercial 
printers, were badly hit by tbe 
downturn in the economy 
earlier this year. This led to 
high rates of company failure 
and subsequent defaults on 
lease payments, . forcing 
Blackspur to step in to honour 
commitments to the banks 
funding tbe duals and finally 
pushing it . into receivership 
last month. \ 


Merchant banks, which 
funded many of the leases, are 
now busy frying to untangle 
the complex deals. But many 
printers, discovering foal the 
management contract is now 
worthless, are refusing to sign 
lease agreements with the 


banks. Another area of dispute 
between the receiver and 
directors of Blackspur is the 
question of the valne of 
equipment bought by Rhyme, 
an of&hore company set up fay 
Mr Davies, BJackspuris chair ¬ 
man. Rbynie bought £3 mil-' 
lion worth of Blackspur stock 
some weeks before the receiv¬ 
ers were called in. 

Mr Kellar, Blackspur’s dep¬ 
uty'managing director, says 
that this was done at his 
behest to provide an urgently 
needed cash injection. How¬ 
ever, the receiver is not sat¬ 
isfied that all tbe transactions 
were at the right price. 

Some of the equipment 
bought by Rhyme is now 
being sold by Kellar pic, which 
was set up by Mr Kellar as a 
holding Company last autumn. 

Another problem for the 
receivers is that like Atlantic, 
before its takeover by B & C,a 
large part of Blackspor’s eq¬ 
uity is held offshore. Chrysalis 
Trust holds shares on behalf of 
Mr Davies and Mr Thomas. 
This trust was set up by 
Moores Rowland, the London 
accountancy firm for which 
Nigel Eastaway, Blackspur’s 
finance director, works as a 
tax consultant 

According to the Institute of 
Chartered Accountants, Mr 
Eastaway is a partner in 
Moores Rowland’s St HeJier 
practice in Jersey, where the 
Chrysalis Trust has its reg¬ 
istered office. 

The second offshore com¬ 
pany. holding shares. Pana¬ 
manian-based Maplewood 
Financial Corporation, also 
has a Jersey office, shared with 
Chrysalis. 


National 
Grid terms 
worry 
bankers 

By Jonathan Prynn 

BRITISH clearing banks are 
baulking at the terms being 
demanded by National Grid 
for the credit facility it must 
put in place before the electric- 
- ity privatisation in December. 

The mandate to arrange the 
facility, which is expected to 
be for about £750 million, has 
not yet been awarded. Five 
banks, including three dea¬ 
lers. Barclays, National West¬ 
minster and TSB, are in the 
running. National Grid is 
arguing that its status as a 
monopoly buyer of electrical 
power from the generating 
companies makes it a better 
credit risk than the 12 regional 
distribution companies. 

The distributors are ex¬ 
pected to announce margins 
on their facilities of about 17 
to 20 basis points over 
London inter-bank offered 
rate (labor), and fees of about 
7.5 to 8 basis points. National 
Grid is pushing for even finer 
terms. • 

Tbe aggressive 15 basis 
point margin and 7 basis point 
fee structure that National 
Grid is looking for would be a 
bitter pill for the clearers to 
swallow. One described such a 
price structure as “cloud 
cuckoo land". 

As well as cutting profit 
margins, the clearers say that 
the deal would cany little of 
the high-margin follow-up 
business that banks rely on 
when they participate in a 
large, finely priced corporate 
loan facility. 

This is in contrast to tbe 
distributors, a number of 
which will be looking for 
lucrative project financing 
packages to fund construc¬ 
tions of their own power 
generators, after privatisation. 
Because of this, the clearing , 
banks are claiming that a deal I 
priced as finely as National 
Grid is demanding would 
present problems at the 
syndication stage. 

Another clearing bank said 
that syndication at the prices 
being talked about would be 
“pretty dicey”. 

However, Manufacturers 
Hanover and Credit Suisse 
First Boston, the other two 
hanks involved, are taking a 
more sanguine view. A banker 
at Manufacturers predicted 
that there would be foliow-up 
business in tbe form of capital 
markets refinancings as well as 
some project finance business, 
such as off-balance-sheet 
financing for new trans¬ 
mission plants. 


Private client broking must 
brush up its act to survive 


T raditional private client stock¬ 
broking is dying. Before the 
stock exchange was reformed, 
in 1986, private client brokers 
lived well because they were accessible 
to their diems, helped them to choose 
shares to buy and sell, and transacted 
the business for commissions that 
though cartelised were not felt to be 
excessive. Clients expected and woe 
given a personal service that may not 
have been sophisticated but it satisfied 
their needs and their notions of value 
for money. 

No longer is that the case, though 
arguably personal service is the only 
way for private client broking to 
survive. Brokers say they cannot afford 
it out of commissions. Before Big Bang, 
they claim, private clients were sub¬ 
sidised out of commission income from 
institutional investors. They no longer 
have time to talk with clients on the 
telephone, let alone face to face in the 
office or over lunch. Discretionary 
management of clients' funds, for 
which fees may be charged, is the only 
feasible alternative to individual ad¬ 
vice. 

With finandal planning now at least 
as important as family planning, clients 
may expect too much. They look for 
guidance on taxation, insurance and 
pensions as well as shares to buy. Such 
“extras’* may be fee-earning for the 
broker but they need to be of pro¬ 
fessional quality to be worth the 
money. At the other end of the 
spectrum clients may want no more 
than an economical “execution only” 
service that competing banks and 
specialist firms like Sbarelink and 
Fidelity are better equipped to offer. 
Not surprisingly several private client 
brokers are in difficulties of one kind or 
other. 

The latest news from the front is 
psychologically even more disturbing. 
National Investment Holdings, the 
parent company of the Nl Group of 
brokers, is up for sale. NI Group 
brought together seven provincial 
broking firms in the belief that size, 
clout and modem centralised services 
would enable them to compete more 
effectively on their own ground. It has 
not yet worked. The NI Group organis¬ 
ation, systems and links, designed by 
Robin Woodhead, the chief executive, 
are admirable of their kind; only tbe 
necessary volume of business is lacking 
to sustain tbe cost and provide Nat¬ 
ional Investment Holdings* institu¬ 
tional shareholders with the prospect of 
a decent return. 

However discouraging this twist in 
Nl Group's fortunes may be. it is too 
early to write off the concept of a 
brokers' collective to preserve and 
develop private client business. The 
other similar group. Allied Provincial 
Services, does not have the sophis¬ 
ticated systems of Nl Group but it has 
been more successful in cultivating 
business. There is an obvious difference 




in approach and emphasis between 
them. It might make sense to put NI 
Group and Allied Provincial Services 
together, but Mr Woodhead and Ber¬ 
nard Solomon of Allied Provincial 
Services are unlikely to see eye to eye. 
Two banks, Royal Bank of Scotland 
and the TSB, have looked at National 
Investment Holdings but the buyer is 
expected to be CCM (Capel-Cure 
Myers asset management group). 

I cannot see private client broking 
going back to a cottage industry made 
up of up small partnerships. But if it is 
survive tbe competition, especially of 
die banks, it has to decide what services 
it wishes to offer, structure commis¬ 
sions and fees properly and do some 
effective marketing. 

Private clients were badly burnt in 
the 1987 crash and they do not return 
quickly to the scene of the fire. They 
have been given a raw deal since Big 
Bang in 1986. Major broking firms 
have shown virtually no interest in 
them; they have been passed from firm 
to firm; the International Stock Ex¬ 
change. as an institution, seems not to 
care; and costs of dealing have been 
stacked up against them. 

And is it not ironic that despite the 
Financial Services Act, the Securities 
and Investments Board, the statutory 
regulatory organisations and a moun¬ 
tain of rule books, it has taken the 
collapse ofBritish & Commonwealth to 
draw attention to the risks to private 
clients of a broking firm (in this case 
Stock Beech) controlled by a financial 
services group that also has an in-house 
bank? 

Panic out of order 


A lthough investors and dealers 
have been in a slightly more 
cautious mood of late, any 
inclination to sell equities has 
been restrained by the market’s rel¬ 
atively inexpensive rating and fund 
managers’ fears of getting their timing 
wrong for the second time this year. It 
was as if selling shares bad gone out of 
fashion. But it can come back, and did 
on Thursday in response to Iraq’s 
annexing of Kuwait 
No one should underestimate the 
chances of Iraq's embarking on further 
military adventures or sparking off a 
major conflagration. What is fact as 
distinct from speculation is a rise in the 
oil price to $23 which will be sustained. 
The balance of power within the 
Organisation of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries has swung toward the hawks 


with a vengeance. We may be looking at 
$25 a barrel, which would be a third 
higher than the 1989 average. For 
comfort we could compare this with a 
quadrupling of the price in 1973-74 and 
a doubling in 1979-80. 

Looking at the oil price parochially, 
the early and visible impact is on the 
price of petrol and the retail price 
index. Double-digit inflation is not 
what John Major needs. It will delay 
the first fan in interest rates and may 
put back the date pencilled in for 
joining the exchange-rate mechanism 
of the European Monetary System - 
two important factors in the City’s 
political and market calculations. 

There is also a possibility that higher 
oil prices will push the economy into 
recession. The latest Confederation of 
British Industry survey of industrial 
trends and figures for retail sales, 
bousing starts, car sales and unemploy¬ 
ment suggest that high interest rates are 
having their (delayed) effect in slowing 
the economy down. Oil at $25 a barrel 
could accelerate this process but that 
would not be the end of the wori<i 
In sum, though the bias of the equity 
market is probably still slightly down¬ 
ward, it will keep its nerve 2 nd not 
panic unless Iraq strikes again. 

Friendly Farley 

A s Sir Kit McMahon is 
discovering at the Midland it 
is not easy to run a clearing 
bank and always remain 
popular with staff, customers and 
shareholders. But there are exceptions. 
“Rob” Farley for one, who retires at the 
end of next month as deputy chief 
executive of the Royal Bank of Scot¬ 
land Group. 

Rob (Henry Edward) must be one of 
the few remaining active links with the 
National Bank that he joined in 1947 
and became, in time, manager of the 
main City office. His first merger was in 
the formation of Williams & Glyn's 
where he was responsible for the 
northern region. His connections with 
Manchester remain strong. Next to 
Scotland — Edinburgh — where he was 
managing director of the Royal Bank 
prior to the merger with Williams &. 
Glyn's. He did much to smooth the way 
to that particular marriage. In the new 
bank he was a director and chief general 
manager before reaching his present- 
position in October 1986. 

He is the sort of banker most of us 
recognise and approve of: helpful, 
human, humorous with a thorough 
understanding of the banking concerns 
of Teal people. He played a formative 
and formidable pan in taking the bank 
into home loans in competition with 
building societies. 

Usefully for a banker. Rob is 
interested in ail forms of rough sport 
He will be missed in Lombard Street 
but seen more often, I suspect, on the 
golf course- 


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40 Somes uea 

39 

44 

*1 


31 


170 

129 Simea Pm 

127 

131 

1 

01* 

01 

94 

M5 12«, Stotoo Pud 

130 

1350 

2 

80 

50 

06 

62 

43 Souse# Bed 

45 

40 

” 

27 

5.7 

4.7 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Pnea Grass YU 

CM Onet Cnogtow p V P/l 


Hp Ua> Carroty 


Id Otto Qi'Rgtdw D % P.1 



Its - 

46.7 

41 329 

144 

140 3 

60 

4 1 280 

Tfi* 

27T -2 

75 

8“ 

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92 1 

60 

90 

02 -1 



95 

96P-S 

34 

3? £5 

* 

145 .. 
73 + 

2.0 

49 

1.4 658 
66 260 

51 

S2-, -S 

19 

1.9 48.1 

C3 633 -4 

367 

46 276 

163 

165 -1 

64 

33 350 

13* 

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174 -3 

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197 . 

22D 

113 129 

'J? 

210 -5 

08 3 
475 4 



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44 312 


1I3P-6 

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23 - 

493 

500 -13 

269 

56 213 

495 

«7 -3 

105 

21 599. 


170 

14 b 

54 02 


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93 

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(II -1 

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2 9 364 

11b 

IIS 

40 a 

3 4 38 6 

179 

132 -1 

17 

JB 390 

64 

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1.7 

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985 

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117 

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t» 839 


170 -* 

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20 

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292 -4 

113 


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51 



?or -3 

70 

IJ 3 .. 

2d. 225 2 


10 459 

95 

97 -i 

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7J 154 

711 

217 3 

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76 

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Tt* 

2 26 -2 

34 340 

>93 

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53 





14 _ 

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163 

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111 124 

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325 

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150 

153 


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386 

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-3 

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189 

192# -1 

114 

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253 

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30 324 

70 

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IDS 

106 

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107ft 111 tlj 

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735 

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214 

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92 

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37 344 

157 

160 

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32 404 

107 

109 

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44 299 

534 

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51 261 

139 

142 

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413 

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270 

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272 270 S-jwi 8 Vne 
50 73 Suiterteie 
218 18 S»n*jsa Cm® 

75 13 IDS Ofcrts 
M 42 US Rnc* 

320 273 TUO *c»K1 
218 158 TV-*n 

107 33 TrtSOmRIttg 

14 5 TMtin] Gd 

14 BlntOC 

I* S', Tan Pfe 
MS US lawman GW 

41 31 Ttoax b 

S7 77 Tnaisy |Eiaj 
95 75 Titan 

75 53 Torer Hr* 

19 13 Tool Sys5*» 

43S IS Trawoad 
483 IMTOKavti 
178 n Tnar 
200 80 TrratpwoU 

fl 55 Tirrai Hiecs 
49 27 Titan 

18 10 loOuitf Ec$m 

41 28 lJSV 

I OS 1B4 IM fnartffy 
78 6* War |ftara| 

63 IS Vanttf* Pact 
!2l 91 VTR PX 

16 H 74 Valet 

108 a «art ft nations 
16 10 Dw 

76 61 Wnson 

3D 16 Vnmndi 
99 53 Kssal 

73 9 WcWt 

13 65 West satvu 

22 E wn>nm 
75 65 Mainer Wrfcjv 

21 9 VMum (RM wfcs 

73 62 Weed jam 0 6 Co 

85 «VMdiuaw 
349 S3 Wvrnto 
90 71 Vtoo 

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90 23 X-Turson 

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155 -1 

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148 

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— 


• E« dividend a Ex all b Forecasi anndanC • Interim 
payment passed f Price at suspension g Duodena and 
yield exclude a special payment k Pre-merger figures n 
Forecast earrwngs o e* other r Ex nghis » Eji scrip or 
share spW t Tax-free .. No stgrafeani data. 


THIRD MARKET 


i Affirm Arc 
I As* Fotips 
lUetm 
i CiBnwe.1 
> Cnaei 
i Cf«i*a lr;l 


25 39 _ 

aj 881 . 
ns 225 _ 
295 3C5 .. 
47 47 

10 U r _ 


i Cfi&MS Stmjt 213 220 

) Citwi tyt 10 80 

I Eginxn 30 35 

> Far t Bca 6 3 

> yum 65 75 

i Bcnot'ii 

I IMt Coma lfr» 174 

i Ken* (P:l 7 9 

1 l£H 40 45 

! Lcatb* Lsi 10 13 

i Rtnuamsuf 3i 34 

UAL 33 SO 

I Itto Grax 1 180 185' 

, Vwaj Ma$c 5? 43 40 


:o &> .. ..«« 

30 35 . 

6 3 4-2 

65 75 1 9 1-3 8 7 

I5n* 174 Z Z. Z Z. 

7 ir. 

40 45 1J 3 0 530 

10 13 -I 12 100 31 

31 34 .. - - 60 

13 30 _ 

1H) 1S5« - 67 37 96 










DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



Basa Rates Clearing Banks 15 Finance Hse 15*6 
Discount Market Loans % 

Overrugnt Hlgn; *5 Low 13» Week fated: 1<S 
Treasury Bits {Discount ^>) 

Bwyng: 2 mth —14 "u 3 nrtti - 14 ,J » 

S#nng:2mm —MS 3rmh-1<" U 
Prime Bank Bits (Discount InwrM'WS 

2 mth: Id*.*-'^ 3rmh: 6 mth I3'4.s-13«i 

Trade B«a (Otscown “Vfc 1 mth: 1S'-.„ 

2mth:l&>i9 3mth: 15 6mth 14'16 
IrrtertMnkJV. Dvermsyrt open 15 dose 15 

1 week: 1S-1«S 1 mth: 15-14"-,, 3mn 15-14”i. 
6mth:14’»»-S 9mth: 14* 1 »-14'4 12mth: 14».»-I4y, 
Local Authority Dapo alfj IS) 

2 day: 15 7 day: 15 1 mth: 14>'v 

3 mth: 15 6mttcl4’/« i2rmn.lJW 
Staffing CDs (%): 1 mth: 14>'•:-■ ■'i- 

3mth. 144 , : .-*a Birth: Wi;-*: 12mth 14'i-^-a 
Dollar CDs (%): 1 mth: 7 95-7.90 

3 mth: 7.95-730 6 rmtv. 7AS-73D 12 mm 7.55-7.90 
Building Society CDs (”«) 

1 irtte 15-14*-,» 2mth: 15-14'i.r. 3 mih: 15-14'f.., 

6mth: 14ft-14 IJ <« 9mth: I4 7 ’r-I4'i 12mth: 14'V-H 

TREASURY BILLS 

Applets: €1.72Sm altoted: ESOOm 

Bids: £96.42-1, received: 

La« week: £96.425°-. received 4£Ro 

Avge rate: E14.341 Hi fast £143317®. 

Next weak: CSOOm replace En/a' 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 

Currency 7 day 1 mm 3 mth 

Dolton B-7t« 7 

CrttB-TH 

Deutachemartc 8%-8'.-* d'-8'. 

CaB: 8-7 

French Franc; 9M‘ ( 9.9 '. 10-9’. 1 

Catt 10-9 

Swiss Franc 9-8’. 9 , «-B , -.b 9 1 

Call: 914-6’- 

Yen; 7V7-„ 7N.-7’... 7 

Cafc7N-6K 


7’iv-r-i. 7 i, ii-7'i.. y , -i.. ,, i, 7' 


GOLD 

BULLION: Per ounce 

Open; S377.75-37B50 Close: 5377.75-378 50 
High; S3S1.00-381.75 Low; S371.75-372 50 

COINS: Per coin (Ex VAT) 

Britannia: $387.00-392.00 (£208 50-2 ■ 1.501 
Krugerrand: 5377.00-380.00 (£203 00-205 001 
Maptetoaf tfloz): S387.00-352.00 i£209^0-2i: .50) 
American Eagles: *387-00-392 00 i£S0S.a(L211.50) 
New Sovereigns: 589 00-91 00 i£48.0(W5^0 j 
Old Sovereigns: 58900-91 00 (Ms 00-49.50 | 

platinum: S4B2-50 (£25940) 

PaUadkam $114.00 (£51.30 > 

Sflvar: $4.85-4.87 (E2 615-2.530) 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


FT-SE100 pre» 0 « 020 " "fierea 25334 

Sep 90_23400 23450 22900 23095 7621 

Dec SO _ 24000 24000 23580 23685 102 

Three Month Stalling Previews open mwresr 1 72570 

Sep 90_ 85.29 £29 8524 8525 10663 

DW 90 —. 06.13 8613 9504 86.05 29139 

Three Month Eurodollar pmwwtwnnwesi 3*378 

S*P 90 82.06 9222 9205 9220 2401 

Dee 9082.13 9254 92.12 9232 3811 

Three Month EuiO DM Pievraus open wwest 61272 
Sep 90 9157 9158 91.SO 9153 5578 

Dec 90 91.42 91.45 9135 91J8 8924 


COMMODITIES 


Three month ECU 

Sep30 _ 8904 8964 

Dec 90 — 89 73 83 75 

US Treasury Bond 
Sep 90 — 83-30 94-08 

Long Gilt 

Sep90 — 84-06 8«-l0 

Japanese Govt Bond 

Sep 90 . 92.00 9207 

Gentian Govt Bond 

Sep 90_ 8324 83 24 

Dec90 ... 82.90 83 05 


Low Close Vol 

Prevails open rntmesi 2745 
8962 8964 H 

89 70 S3.71 30 

Pievrau-s open Merest 4746 
93 20 93-25 MD4 

ProviCuis open K1HV03132413 
83-04 83-30 34140 

Previous open raiwast 1073 
51 75 51.75 313 

Prew-Ous open imarest 77534 
8253 82 73 48445 

82 85 82 71 


LONDON OIL REPORTS | 

Prices continued to surge with each report from Kuwait Crude ofl 
prices have risen by approximately SS/bW since Monday. All 
products moved in the same dtrecton. 


LONDON FOX 

COCOA AMT Future* 


CRUDE OtL5/aasaa*ad (S/BBL FOB) 
Brant Phys 2355 +1.7 

15 day Sep 23.80 +15 

15 day Oct 2350 +1J 

WTISep 2535 +2U 

wn Oa rya n/a 

PRODUCTS Duy/aeU STMT. 

Spot OF NW Eure - prompt defivoty 
Prem Gas .15 +10 +19 

Cased EEC +18 217-Zld +1« 

Non 1H Sep +15 220-222 +16 

Non 1H Oct +15 2*5-221 +16 

as Fuel OU +07 tM-106 +08 

Naphtha +06 203-207 +07 

BIFFEX 

GM Freight Futures Dry Cergo (Sip/gtj 
Aug 90 Hi 1218-1218 Low Close 1235 

Sec 90 W-Low Close 1280 

Oct BO Hr 1340-1315 LOW Oosa 1340 
Jan 31 Hi 1340-1330 Close 1340 
Vol 227 lots open Merest 4488 

Dry cargo index 1180 -6 


IPE FUTURES 

GASOIL AMTFutnrev 

Aug-21800-17,60 

Sap-21650 SLR 

O a -21500 SLR 

Nov-215.00 BYR 

Dec-214.75 SLR 

Jan-212.00 SLR 

Feo-208.00-01.00 

vol ....-14036 

BRENT AMT Futures 

Sep —_ 23.4 5-23 

Oct-- 2320-2X30 

vw-n/a 

LONDON POTATO 
FUTURES (C/tonne) 
Mth Open Close 
Nov 87.5 B83 

Feo 950 S4.D 

Apr 139.0 U4A 

May 151.5 1580 

Vol 386 


Sep»8«7 
Dec 728-728 
Mar 758-757 
May 778-777 
COfttL 
Sep 556455 
8m 577-576 
Jan 599-596 
Mar 616-615 
SUGAR 
FOB 


JlH 798-797 
Sep 818-815 
Dec 843-840 
VOI7891 
AMT Futures 
May 632-628 
Jul 650-645 
Sep 674-666 
Vol 3016 

CCzamifcow 

Vat 3795 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE' 

OfflcM prices/vokime previous day Rudolf Worn 
(E/tonue) Cash 3 month Vet 


Copper Gde A 1545 0-1546.0 
Lead 462.00-462.50 

ZrtCSpocHi* 1576.0-1577.0 
Tin* 611 Ml 20 

Akaimsn HT 17190-1720.0 


T (Cents per Troy oz). * (S per tonne) 


1533 0-1534.5 640C50 
469.00-470.00 63775 
1522.0-1523.0 214900 
6231-6235 6350 

1748 0-1749 0 619550 
10175-10200 16602 


Oct 224.6-24.0 May 222.0-21 0 
Dec 237.6-20.0 Aug 223.6-220 
Mar 220.4-202 Oct 223.4-204) 
LONDON GRAM FUTURES 
WHEAT ctose fV) Voi 110 

Sp 112.55 N» 116.65 Ja 120.65 
Mr 123.90 My 127-10 Jn 128.80 
BARLEY dose (£ft) VOI 527 

Sp 111.60 Nv 115.60 Ja 119.00 
Ur 121.80 My 123JX) 
SOYABEAN AMI raw: 
Oct 107 50B.Q 
Dec 1143-16.0 

Feb unq Vol 0 


LONDON MEAT 
FUTURES (/kg) 
Urn Pig Contract 
Min Open Close 
Aug 110.0 1103 

Sep 1105 110.0 

Oci m3 1H3 

Nov 112.0 110.5 

Live Catde Contract 
Aug unq «mq 

Oct unq unq 

Nov unq unq 

Vol Pig-26 CaBe-B 


MEAT fi LIVESTOCK COMMISSION 

Av’ge tatstock prises at representative 
markets on August 3 


(/kg Iw) 

GB (pi 

GS (-,-) -1.2C ’-«0.62 -4.0-1 

Eng/wal ('*) +165 -£5.7 -30 7 

Eng AVal ip) 76^5 13230 Sg.55 

Eng/Wai (♦/-> -120 -11.64 - 52 a 

Scotland f'o) n/a -i£.7 -165 

Scotund (pi n:a 130.93 110 46 

Scotland (+/-J -471 +V57 

■ Estimated dead cansase weigh: 


Pig Sltoop Cattle 
78.95 132 63 100.08 






















































































































































■50 MONEY 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


(M *5 __ » "»* 1 Y=r 

—- ’ ■ Stead pgi rat* pw raito 

___ UK GENERAL _ 

Amn toSS* 14691 5 ® w 9 — 

166?‘959 38 904 52 

JUMtv*?iL Cm 322Q 97 6 <3 9)? ?7 

•?,£ K rz 972 53 925 34 

S M 4047 967 71 $30 30 

{SS2S §?W SIS siaq ,J7:J M WO K 

L^TrL?”® 60 * lnc 609 19S8 97? 53 Ol'-S JJ 

t^rS*4. *84 9296 980 33 El5 91 

I SSi??,!. «*, 600 SO'S 985 M 924 37 

IKjKllISL 675 3694 ** - 872 9" 

TjwraKUmtewji e« ms< saj a oio « 


t Aa« oonau Ga A Inn 
A*wt Cm 
t A*®» Emmy 
T B«i*n Um ‘SOD 

t Bjc&k; Ui» Qaiert 
2*^5 Urn Trustee 
Banwtnis hv 

Hamra Porta ho 

1 Btffttreqn* PEP he 
|Ww» UK 4 Genoa! 
B«w Sh 0 cy UK Genoa! 
Bnjwt income Got 

t Rwonwet gbwtji 

Bu*mast* hv Ponfota 
Canon Bin 
CO. UK General 


653 J5J3 97.8 39 925 34 

4 01 36S0 036 IB 86 ? 65 

3 50 95.13 gas 10 98? 2 

5?5 1014 36 3 IS — 

693 451J 963 65 856 8 ? 
610 139J3 97.6 43 {H 6 66 

356 1965 96? 71 94 7 15 

600 307 6 96 3 77 BB? 69 

3 3? 5509 973 SO 90 4 £3 

650 39 05 96 7 71 865 77 

600 5964 97J 50 900 57 


OmoniwGswrai loot 536 6ii3 »6 ra 957 iq 
wtonai Masai Camtal 651 £154 951 100 833 69 

T Coraedoaum Grn 649 42.06 SEfl 10 9*6 45 

Cmaasa Tnsi 605 2557 960 85 656 83 

Cwnh# UK Sjjuay &® &4<0 98? 25 79.9 9? 

tCfWm CUi 701 3547 96 0 55 9l) I 56 

CS Portfolio 599 7381 96 0 85 899 59 

ICU Guta General 596 10610 974 49 930 30 

T CU UK 6 Gewa 603 f*» 971 51 837 61 

Dsartonaiy 493 1434 JplQ 1 767 S6 

r Eagtt Star UK B&nctd 600 1006 96.9 65 970 40 

EnqtaJi Tim Cm 519 1S4J8 56 7 7l 90.9 4$ 

1 EariAe Petxre SOO 10608 975 « BJ5 ^ 

Ew» & Law Genera) 601 3412 969 66 P5.4 11 

t Earn fi l*» uk cran eos i»? w? 3i 9£< it 

T FvfcKy Grown S tac 661 1353 962 79 897 61 

Ftaeig Caudal Portfolio 254 1215 958 93 96 8 7 

T FfanUimlpn he 8 Gath 5s7 1 B 1 7 95 5 95 SS 3 6? 

fnends Prov £ 0 * 1 ? 600 73?54 972 53 94.1 19 

GA Gaum 56S IS 61 97 5 46 976 3 

GAM LA Spec 600 W384 95 4 98 864 79 

Gannwciwme a.a is»8& 97 6 43 %4 9 

GREGoanIMI 348 378? 926 1C3 635 89 


MU 1 mom T war 

Fail _ - m _ TO Spmad wsl rat* part ra* 

t ton) London 5oec Sic 595 144.7 IC01 13 856 91 

Rna Lamton UK Gill 599 55 04 999 IS 87.5 75 

ftnd TiuH PPT OK 5-19 104 3 959 IJI 977 30 

Roys Trust Smano Cos 700 5631 962 ITS 65.6 194 

RorJ Tiufl UK Spec SB 654 7510 965 146 — 

fS&PSasswres 598 2315 1006 a 866 84 

t SiP Sow Srts 596 1320 95 0 161 73 7 160 

t SAP UK Etuty 5» Pi£7 951 177 87.7 U 

j 5&P UK Smaller Cos Gill 5.38 5391 1001 13 80 4 130 

SSWGtt 5.43 110.1 380 66 97 T 7. 

saw straw Searnm 5<8 »iz 93 6 48 6J.1 10G 

SdvDdcf EmerpnsS ACC 509 K?S 973 1C8 978 38 

ScnrodM Beanery (hist) 599 1353 984 £3 884 63 

Srtio&a Cffi 597 17iS M9 36 506176 

Scnwfet UK 5m Cos dnsij 600 98.33 Pfi 1 ■*57 77 3 151 

Sorrow UK tms» Grom* A 564 29.34 07.5 93 89.1 5B 

Seal Am EcuflV 611 4 &JI 93 7 46 90.1 52 

T San 4m £aun Strategy 610 5799 973 1C8 874 76 

Ecoi Am UK Sm Co 609 4903 9T5 93 871113 

S&i E<Mt 6.« 22.69 100 6 6 C7.4 >1! 

Sol Mid UK Smfr Cos Equdy 6(0 £77.5 97^ 93 78 6 155 

Seal Mul UK Spec Srts 601 64 35 965 140 756 160 

Sur FTnv Enuiy Q.1 655 7076 98.0 60 915 26 

7 Saveaisn £mcal GOO 5)02 93 6 48 930 24 

T SowroQH UK Cm £24 5294 94 8 184 S06 43 

Sunoard Lita UK Equity Gift 560 4368 991 30 96.7 II 

Sun Albaoce Fqiity TiuSl 7D1 6104 930 56 94 6 22 

Sun Lite 01 Cauda UK Clh 651 334? 978 70 87 9 70 

Target UA C*wal 679 91.14 96.2 I5S 77? 1 S 1 


THE 



TIMES 


Md - 1 MW* 

prim Sfrfld pul qt* 


UNIT TRUST STATISTICS 

The four end cofiannd, showing the value of El00 over one month and pne year 
and their subsequent ranking within their sector, are based on offer to bid prices 
without income re-invested. Unit trusts founded within the last year have 
dashes In those columns, f denotes PEP marker. 


LASEumpaan 
LUBitW Earn IWenr AH 
Urard ftawani S 81 
tay & Gansral Ponmaan • 
Lto\5s QM 1 Euro t» 


ManAto Eure 
UMnCvne 


mx Spread pen m 


IM 1 taam 1 w> 
on SOW peri mk pwl n* 


Tfiamun Uh Ooportumtiis 
t TP Smaila Cflmp«es 
TIP Soec OmanuuiKs 
TS6 BffliS-1 Grti 
T56 Erorromonui tovwwr 
TS6 Sc«ci OWJonuiiiW 
TSB Smaiser Cos 
TvndaH British Lon 
Tvndall SnuHcr Cns 
Uh UTM ftilKh Gtn 


679 91.14 96.2 155 77? iSl 

660 6109 99.6 IB 913 4t 

599 8013 965 1*6 7*3 17B 

$09 6480 918 193 65? 185 

600 7443 97 6 76 96.6 12 

599 5005 565 146 94 7 ?! 

509 W49 973 103 864 M 

5 99 53.34 97 5 63 80 5 128 

5 57 91.32 971 123 84 7 101 

5 63 72J0 950 1W 7?4 174 

5« W»9 919 200 8131 '9 


t ww an Pra Stores 5M 1653 900 41 766 4ft 

_ 296 2167 « 7 43 90 6 28 

»IA Safety Foa 599 2199 97.0 <8 83.3 44 

•Ajtjf Acan Reserve 4 75 61.48 101.0 7 1103 r 

MAGiS&R 551 497? 910 43 849 38 

ww» at S.toiv 600 9381 1003 23 853 40 

Pn»lc Prenme* 8 FI 6li 39 id «J3Q I 75 8 49 

ftoW London G* toe 5*8 Sfi77 lOl 3 2 973 21 

ROT font Mama 6.99 4060 996 35 744 50 

SAP Sit fi Rfnc 544 4645 101.0 7 S5.5 <1 

Schrader Find inrerest 506 47.10 100 5 22 — 

SeJWdnG* 506 two 1005 22 91S 25 

Sovereign CnorMed Poiom 624 Mil 949 S3 851 40 

Sranrurd Life UK Gtr A Ff 499 25.95 100 7 15 91 d 25 

Swss L*t Feted Interest 349 2239 1000 3? 905 IS 

T aw t Preference 65s iger gra 45 70 8 52 

t TSB Praam toe 4 00 <U8i 970 4S B7 3 37 

wimmodaie sm Drd Ga 137 8611 1 O 11 S 1 O 8 S 3 

EecM Brenpemaais 6JO — 993 SG 903 52 


1> ijtv Technical Arelvss 600 6718 98.7 « 900 S3 

UTAH Frai'j House CjoUI 599 2170 S3? 56 89 5 57 

waidley UK Gill 647 I7?d 053 If I 05.8 90 

Wsrenn Pem, srxs 593 2593 90 9 1J1 741158 

t Vtese* Uh rim 635 119 5 972 117 914 40 

Wndsor Gm 6 >6 77 81 95.fi 142 74 4 166 


INTERNATIONAL BALANCED 


New Court Stnlr-Bdi) Qa 


&oa»«» VWb Porttfio 

Ciornw! ftnrdow 
CU Prtir bw Ponfo 
OJ Prof torPonfo 
CU Prog kw Ponl'a 
GA heonre Portfr*o 


350 6259 9?0 14 94U a 

651 6266 98.7 6 9*3 7 

559 5094 985 ? 90? 13 

&00 S80G 965 IB »5 T6 

fi(» 5498 97? 13 8S? W 

5.(7 4943 066 15 90S 12 


Swiss L*f Fettd Infcres 
Taw PrelarencB 
t TSB Praam lnc 
Whmnodale sm Drd Ga 
Eertor knmpfTateh 


INVESTMENT TRUST UNITS 


GREOaanlWI J48 378? 926 <C3 635 89 

Gomne$s Mann T B Sm Cos 572 250.1 983 25 77 6 M 

Henderson lnc & Assets 6?4 15663 997 3 905 51 

1 HBMJiKKti bicpme (, Gift 657 213% 98 3 25 616 £0 

?HW Samuel Botch 650 7721 96 1 91 97.3 46 

tIflJ 5anua lnc & Gtn 64J (224 95 4 98 89 3 64 

hotoam EcJdy 650 596 09 9SO 33 90 0 57 

t K8 General 599 2420 970 64 921 39 

TWPPPinc GOO 9675 95 1 100 9i7 « 

TLA5 (nenme 6 Gill 600 61 77 981 32 87? 75 

Lwencc Keen tnenme S Glh 6CO 4932 966 73 — 

Ureruan Itaaervjk-M Amh 599 6072 -XT 12 9i2 47 
Ucaa Uh tnenme A Gffl 208 2939 955 95 93 4 26 

Ldn A Mu GenerU 680 64 16 99? 33 976 5 

Uorts eaunew 500 264 )5 960 33 977 4 

MSG General 544 S6?8 976 42 93 5 25 

t»&G UHlana 6I0 1C059 371 57 Oil 64 

f MSG Serona Genoa 5 44 I0J0 « 5 76 90 3 54 


Wmasar Smarter Comnanes 6 19 3391 65 9 201 503 191 

1 VoNishve General 7 J I 58 99 956 166 76 4 157 

Seciir Aeerage/Tecds 6.16 — 67? 201 84J) 161 


UK EQUITY INCOME 


Abbey Htgn income £®nty 
- itfrasi Tj a* be 
aoiitu UK Enuity lnc 
AEnu Ktrp View 
AEtaa income A i5fi 


650 1419 962 101 925 28 

6.34 44 54 97 4 TO 891 &4 

536 5683 1006 4 — 

5 59 9348 93 0 54 91 1 40 

558 3509 983 06 870 93 


AHrust RT 

a** oi nre»d to* Trua 
Crew Inv Trnsi 
EoudaUe hv Trust; 
Exeter Fund at lav Tstj 
Garerw* Praeocai hv 
KB f 7T 

Ldn 3 Mo Inv Trust 
MSG tod Or bnr Tsts 
SAP rru 

Sednr Areragc/TaUlt 


6J2 Ml 3 990 3 96 5 1 

5.44 T0B8 962 9 92S * 

699 3864 979 7 913 7 

500 118.67 30? 2 913 7 
625 2593 979 7 698 9 

6 75 9012 989 4 9i 9 6 

559 2905 559 10 92.0 5 

6J81 46.12 962 6 090 10 

5.45 4059 1U09 1 943 2 

600 138.7 985 5 94 9 2 

B.1B — SH W 924 IB 


Samara GMaJ (nc ft Gth 651 907? Ifll 2 2 1005 Z 
UanMe M«i«d Pontoba 599 48.79 952 18 — 

Uwhs S Spencre bn. & Part 6.50 114 7 97.7 11 91? 11 

Uarttunagn bm goo 4959 - 988 d 01 ? 10 

Merton Pumobo 627 6081 983 8 08.7 5 

Roval Life tad Cautionary 590 49 39 688 -4 946 6 

natal London tori lnc 5.99 6200 090 3 993 2 

Scat PiT* QotaJ (re 658 20 13 98.3 8 feB 15 

Temptetnnwmw Babncrd to 650 11262 96.1 17 roB S 

Pnrmm ton 1U Yield E23 61 14 975 1? - 992 4 

UWdby townata^ Ine 647 1989 98.1 10 844 17 

Vfhangtele CMumv ' 270 6525 1019 1 107.6 1 

Swhr AnrawraUi SM — Stl tt 9M u 


FUND OF FUNDS 


Royal Treat PPT 
S&p Etnmat G 


SAP to eg^r tocomn I 

SSSb, 

asrar 

Sad Met toman 


>Gm &01 
a S.19 

538 
« Gth 6.00. 
1 536 


Abbey Masor Trim 
tflesb Bfiwi Rrera Perl 
Aego Ml Grn 
Aegis (PS Porttofto 
tong Sefea umjm 
Rdefty Moneytuibei 


649 32.57 974 9 93? 

600 5635 1018 1 335 

591 56 5> 100? 2 1042 

GOO 56£1 S35 3 955 

5 74 573B 981 4 916 

629 34.13 31.1 4 914 


Ldn A Mu General 
Uorfi Oairocea 
MSG General 
t MAG uuizna 
f MSG Serana Genoa! 
MAG Trustee 
CAnrDta Gill 
Matnesoi UK Gm 
Maytknwi Bnnsn Leaden 


AEtna Smaller Ctn Dnidert 559 79 36 56 I 102 M 7 120 

Adcnuicties, tarnm? Bu'ta 599 50 79 9S6 27 873 80 

1 Aiied Ounba iauri Inc 509 1972 970 bj 89 3 59 

t ANioj Duntcar Hwi me 610 3678 983 43 964 5 


INTERNATIONAL GROWTH 


5 44 6T61 937 12 87 3 74 

60? 1357 9r>8 68 92 8 32 

650 7051 950 162 94 1 19 

599 273 7 96 0 65 88 9 65 


t Mercury Bnnsn Blue Ctao 626 6T 53 98.7 17 93 5 


t Mercury Eeoenl 625 236 

MGM UK Cm 5 99 330: 

TSMtondli* 650 2S3 

t MM But Assets f> Eamras 688 503' 

f IWM Bm ire A G3i 652 35?: 

t MU General 8 O 1 437 - 


6 26 396 3 99 3 2 920 40 

5 99 330 3 99 ] 6 787 94 

650 253 1 960 85 833 fS 

638 60 37 95.9 90 87 1 76 

652 252? 97 5 46 554 Jl 

6 O 1 4374 971 57 64 3 87 


t ABied Guntur £01017 Inc 
T AHicd Duntai hrm Inc 
I T AH«d Ounbar r*.n Vieid 
1 Adchmu Oiunerty lnc 
A«ei lnc 

EUnv ni iieunf toe ftrc 
r Borciayi Uni £<tra lnc 
Birdsvs Urn toe 
fljnno EgulV toe 
80 ircimk Gn 
8rfwn Or.iiend 
T Brow Sfrtfey lnc 
T BucwnaslH toe 
Cjihwi lnc 


60? 3993 97 0 82 92D 3 : 

566 43 31 1012 3 723 118 

5tB 12205 S8.3 18 B3.4 57 
S<9 85 34 94 9 116 94& 13 

650 104 4 97S 60 884 71 

649 4592 95.6 III 853 98 

5 74 78 50 99 4 31 92 6 25 

*52 270 9 99.7 7 9? 9 35 

599 B08I 897 125 717 119 

6 54 1G7.7 98 5 27 853 98 

5 67 166 6 95.4 113 69.4 57 

*50 4 9 08 9* 7 8 9 87 4 78 


ABbey tatwrabonal 598 6343 935 13 116 ’ 1 

AbtnEi World Glh 63? 5658 975 29 99? 16 

Antn Ertucal Trust 5 01 1067 96 7 9 972 27 

tegs BStone Firon tail 650 5627 941 135 944 4J 

AetnsB Stone Frank S«t Opp 601 4052 951 113 721 145 


Henderson Famfy U e n dara un 627 60 98 06.7 12 W.7 8 

Henderson Femiy of Funds 614 8l?0 W* 9 933 7 

W Samoel Portlow 6.50 5551 94 7 19 854 19 

Hodrem Trust 647 24?? 95 3 18 87.9 18 

KB Master 602 2133 97 6 8 1026 2 

Lloyds Master Thai 503 4 7.66 98 8 II 924 9 

Udtaod Marogea PontaSo Ac 850 7357 965 14 835 17 

MM Bn Mangea uw 684 73.53 95.7 17 907 14 


Artis CAMca Jnt Bee 


4 99 48 45 968 53 — 


teas QoiMi Stoat Plato *01 4625 956 93 896 95 


T Morgan fir«i UK bideeTiia *55 119 < 963 


rter Court Kamr UK Cos 711 7759 978 29 936 24 

tern Court Srwr UK Co 8.78 21897 *35 4 548 65 

tNUUKEontV 625 '438 572 53 *57 81 

Itonwti UK &jwv 600 10604 98 3 25 9i 7 4] 

NPIUKAcc 609 502 1 96 2 79 87 5 ?3 

Pearl Ettahr *->€ 78?5 96.1 81 89 7 61 

TPratt uMnlemaMiiul 35 6 00 51?* 980 33 

TPrtv Mutual me £ Glh 592 1203 995 4 

natance Bnusii Lrte 570 2535 971 57 


I t C-iVUI House Income ft GO) 599 219J 98 6 21 929 22 
t CCF Sri High toe Eaucy 60! £058 97? 79 — 

I TtienfflMeoEvi>rt0itae5OD 6463 967 19 923 32 
CofflMI Heih fix 601 4092 993 12 886 68 

T Clean lign toe 7 TO 372 3 95 8 104 895 55 


At rru taenswitia Glh 
Abied Duibai toiemasona) 
Alton OiflAar Tetrnoiwjy 
Alfre d Dun bar Waadwde 
ArtudnM GUi 
Artnogm Werjwwral 
Bank at (island But Osaas 


6.11 110.8 95 2 IU oi? 54 

577 1084 94? 134 894 07 

6 05 104.1 92.4 140 BE 8 (01 

6.03 33 34 94 4 127 85 7 119 

558 119.7 96.4 65 80 9 136 

600 50.78 94.1 136 93 0 51 

5.49 1744 95.1 113 3Z3 59 


tKtagan Giro Mod 
Nonwdr Master Trust 
SAP Master Fund 
San Alfrance ParBoKi 
Stn bit Uaaei Partita 
Sarin ARngafToUti 


6*4 73.53 95.7 17 9G7 14 
700 104 5 963 15 905. IS 
590 97.02 9tL6 13 896 » 

600 41 10 961 16 953 5 

700 59 73 9 7 8 8 913 11 

650 36.98 67 7 7 921 10 

&2S. — 974 19 till fi 


Bank oi Ireland Wmaeopps 5 49 109 9 98.6 12 I ft? 5 


NORTH AMERICA 


570 2535 971 


TCU tK 
1 CU UulWt taj 
[ t Etoie Sur Uh H^n inc 
EFM limwin S lnc 
BtfUiSh Tit!* frtc 
t EtluiLfti? Hf.n lnc 


601 4092 993 12 886 68 

7TO 372 3 95 8 104 895 £5 
600 65TO 97 9 60 90 5 50 

600 9603 558 112 66.1 91 
595 1141 962 4J 35 4 9 

586 209 3 93 6 124 86 5 » 

6 05 138 67 950 H5 868 *5 
5.00 111 27 967 83 88 7 67 


Barctan Ura Untv Tear 
Barclays Uni Wnrtovnde 
Benng Gfoba! Gth 
BcflcHgate Can A For 
Bemonsgaie rntarat 
fKhojrv)aie Prapessne 
BisnopJoate Sprs Sc Inc 
Brewn Caod 


*24 6302 97 8 23 89? 9B 
627 148 9 971 <2 627 131 
5.74 80 38 96B 51 960 33 

525 263 0 07 3 31 9*7 28 

525 22.47 96.1 78 K8 *3 

573 2216 993 4 37 

525 234 2 98 3 14 595 19 

595 147 6 01 6 149 E6.6 146 


Royal Life UK into Tracking 6 IS 126.8 


Sender UK Corny 
Schroder UK todfj flcti 


EM 1618 951 31 939 
553 1270 943 35 966 


t EtluiUtie rfl-i lnc 5.00 11127 967 C3 88 7 67 

r Eourtv S LZ" Hcter lnc * 0 ? 3105 070 82 94 5 M 

E«l« Earn H 191 toe. 626 S’ M 1026 1 1005 2 

FSCUKinc 65J 1091 ?77 S3 V. 7 6 


1 SOU Etpl UK KuB Old 6.36 2570 S56 94 — 


Scrt life UK Early 
Scot Mai UK Equity 
Sea KWl UK G[h 
Sax VAKwn tonty 


649 2752 571 57 924 37 
800 255 4 97 1 57 66? 60 
6SI 535S 968 M — 
621 424 8 96 4 24 92 7 33 


Scrtnowor Vic sv Model Pun 247 1?6 6 95 5 95 £45 IS 
Standard Life UK Emmy Gen 588 36 01 587 12 974 G 


F&C UK lnc 
Fidelity Income PIls 
I Fleming inane Poidoto 
T Framirmjijfi Ecra me 
Frainbnoton Monmiy Ire 
t Friftob Pruv S iro lnc 
7 F5 l« Gib 


6BI US* 975 68 86 3 85 

23S 60 46 9*8 8 7 93 4 21 

*98 269 7 g4.1 123 85 9 92 

558 1332 9*4 31 f.75 105 

600 5663 96 3 36 771 115 

5 99 49 47 5*0 103 63.6 68 


G Bfctan Sr Vmcad Hqb Inc i46 H7D 987 19 033 18 


Stmart Kory Ontsh 
T Stanai (wry PEP 
Swac Life Forty 
Taroj Eguty 
tTB General Gm 
Trades Umon 
TTSS General 
TT58 lnc 
Unted croniies 
VAnnsor Asset Value 
Sector Average/ToWs 


5 48 848 8 992 7 609 92 

554 126 3 991 8 — 

551 5816 %i 16 949 14 

674 163 0 £57 12 839 83 

599 79 55 969 & 886 67 

4% 269 2 97 7 41 94 8 lb 

600 22369 95 8 92 90 9 49 

603 31268 97! 5? 90 3 54 

624 ?0(ii 961 81 9T.8 42 

649 17C92 959 90 94 1 19 

SJ 8 — S7J 1B3 90.4 96 


UK GROWTH 


Abbey 1992 Enterprise 
Abbey Assels & turnings 
Abbey Envoi 
AKrust Smdl Companies 
AWrnsi Spec S 45 
Amnia UK Gib 
AEtna Reto-idv 


600 6688 57 9 71 97.7 7 

5 97 189 7 £32 58 916 38 

599 5174 Ml 28 839 54 

63 3 5313 £74 101 747 1*4 

6 32 6652 567 140 79 4 13* 

634 39 43 97 0 125 K9 60 

558 2066 S4? J97 — 


A£ma Smaller Cos GnwSi Ac 5 56 316* 95 7 1*5 59*169 

AEina UK Gib SE0 44:8 970 125 364 87 

AlWwrchia Amry Pad 5 75 6623 994 24 913 29 

t Ated Dunbar 2nd Small Cos 6 06 1514 958 162 £31180 

tAla* Durbar Capital 609 305 8 97 2 117 905 <9 

TAfrrtfl Dtmbar Oseos Ezrreng 608 268 6 965 146 952 19 

TAC«d Dunbar Recovery 605 1159 97 4 104 670 ts. 

T Albed Dunoar Smaller Cos 605 1S9 6 94 3 160 772 161 

t Alfred Dime® UhSwcSrts 610 3156 97.1 132 917 37 


f Ganmore toe 6 50 109 5 

Glwfruis Hrgfter (nc S 54 I2S: 

tHraen Uh Fioaiesroe lnc *49 79 1 

TGnsr.uie Bndge me 600 225 1 

GflE tac 5 46 114.1 

Giestam inc 6 50 197 1 

tGTInc 655 112 W 

TGT Smll Cos BniderM 651 457! 

tGumness Mahon Hiqn me 655 956: 

t Hambres Eguty toe 597 110? 

HamOras >frgb lnc 6 00 8241 

Henderson High tac 677 2842! 

Hencerean Sm Cos 0« 856 l50?l 

Hdl Samuel Hun Yield *4g 96 2! 

T He loom Enuiv tac 649 66 i! 

James Capel me 629 «8< 

t K8 Hign Vfcfrf EDI 1227 

f W? Lft Snuton Cos Onr 600 41J&; 

They Inc 650 92.4C 

LAC Ik 1» 567 i 

T US Edn Inc 579 CTSC 

Laiersnan Hgh Inc 600 9195 

Laard UK lnc 2.19 205 £ 

LdnSMcrtac 660 5597 


650 10953 943 118 84 0 104 

554 1262 968 87 69 5 55 

*49 7917 934 10 86 0 73 

600 22511 935 27 63 6 68 

5 46 114.8 958 104 929 22 

6 50 197 0 98? 43 87.1 82 

65511280 957 108 67? 79 

651 4579 97.4 70 — 

6 55 95 67 98 3 36 90 6 49 

597 110? 96 9 86 85? 98 

60] 82 46 98 0 54 857 95 

677 284 25 96 5 97 88 3 72 

856 I50?6 952 114 69 0 121 

*4g 96 25 £65 97 921 33 

649 66 75 97 8 66 852 101 

629 4J89 981 51 550 10 

EDI 1227 966 94 913 28 

600 41.53 9S4 31 73.5 117 

650 92.40 58B 16 837 IDS 

I 99 567 7 102 I 2 e? 7 107 

579 2230 95 7 108 875 77 
600 9195 1001 5 960 6 

2.19 205 5 97 3 78 S93 3 


6 nmn SbifUey HI Recowrv 612 30 43 95 9 86 912 72 

Biovm Siam Mgd PortoM 610 3258 9S2 74 746103 

TBucknarwFetoWvpTmslGai 65 79 973 31 669 112 
Butunagier itaemaanai 570 103 5 971 £2 75 4 14? 

Cannon GfDSai 651 5651 957 97 92.7 54 

CamMiiy Gfrnlnars Asses 600 2356 959 66 76.0 141 

Caudal House bit I Gib 599 24 24 96 7 58 905 37 

CCF sei Ml Gib 717 4*74 973 3| 8S9 99 

ca Q 0 tm 599 46 79 95 0 116 021 61 

Ciencal Med Attra Mgd On 649 2741 95 5 192 900 91 

Ctorta Med Ewgreen 600 28.48 953 86 — 

Comnfr Intonations 6C0 6748 96 3 70 91 5 63 


Crown Inn Temntiiow 
T Crown Ugd tai l Equty 
CS Iniematonit 
CU Charter hiematronaf 
CU Wortdmde Spec Srts 
Eagle Siv ton Spec Sas 
EFM HtnOhonal tec 
Equable lonnuunai Gib 


600 26.48 953 86 — 

6GO 6748 96 3 70 91 5 63 

7 02 1J2 4 950 116 87.1 110 

701 31M 929 M5 79* 138 

599 £826 ?73 31 872 109 

593 114 10 96 2 16 95 9 25 

6.51 55 13 34 7 122 94.3 44 

600 4533 95? 93 880 105 

5.B8 2734 91.0 45 951 S 

500 6125 969 48 97.6 25 


Eguty 8 Law GtoKU Oops 601 60 88 94 3 132 948 40 


Ldn 6 Kta tac 650 55 97 98 5 27 94 7 11 

Legal fi General Equity lnc 600 65 71 940 113 879 75 

Lloyd! foe 5 00 42104 97 5 6* 972 4 

T MSG Dividend 544 *304 96.7 89 925 28 

M&G Eguitv tac aiO 273B 96.7 89 A65 88 

TMSG Ewra YWd 5 44 358.7 98 D 54 92 5 28 

MSG tbfltt lnc 670 2230 g;o K 862 90 

Maidan General 250 1038 9S4 10 886 66 

Manuite Hum lee 59* 1669 8*5 97 060 73 


FaMiy Mroaged imemai 
Frairtingiro Inti 
Framkngron Rearvery 
Fnenos Prov tod Gib 
GA Growtn Portfobo 
GAM £ S Intemaronal 
Garanore Frontier Markets 
Garonne HI Sel Opps 
Gernnore bm *m« 
GtontroiS Pnvaie Portfolio 
Gored im 1 Gwth 
GRE imenrnnnre 
Gmiarn Global Gth 
GT bitertuumaj 
GT Wortd4iik) Spec Sts 
Guta Im Cap 


5B5 176 5 97 ? 40 99.9 16 

599 2022 950 11* 1034 (0 

599 201 7 953 86 84 6 723 

600 eB5B 956 99 914 71 

5 65 5223 976 27 S58 37 

5 95 366.14 9*9 48 vS? 30 

614 403B 1003 I 110.9 3 
550 1353* 960 81 SIS 69 
450 89 61 93.4 140 77 4 140 
4 12 296D 986 60 87.4 107 
6*9 107.19 5J.3 132 B74 107 
550 133 7 95 7 97 90 7 80 

65i) IBB7 96 2 74 900 91 

650 2M 40 . 97.8 23 97 9 23 

651 7912 97 6 27 33.9 46 

696 41 11 95 8 93 85 4 120 


GurU lid Cap 696 41 11 95 6 93 85 4 120 

Guraess Mahon Gtabal Glh 6.55 57 B9 98 7 9 92 4 57 

Hambras hitenrannal Srs 650 5902 95.4 105 9T.0 75 

Hroderaoi Internal 5 97 19344 941 136 90 2 87 

HrH Samuel trttemaHHUl 649 1609 PS ( 113 564 114 

(Mtom Commratim 650 6629 933 1*1 744 144 

Koitmn Imerrartonal Glh 
Habam tan Sauer Cos 


6.50 12419 955 1G3 91.1 73 
649 5575 947 122 B9B 94 


Abbey Amencan Gth 
Abbey Amencan lnc 
Abbey US Emerg cos 
AWrua Amencan Inc A Gmfa 
Acuma Nth Amenca 
AEtna Haiti Amenran Gth 
Aired Ditabar Amer Sp Sits 
Allied Datar Amencan tac 
Alfred Duaoar Sex o> Amer 
Serdays Un American 
Buoays Uni American Rec 
Baring Amman Gib 
Barng Amencan Smlr Cos 
Ben Court America 
BG Amenca 

Brawn Sbwey NAmeric a 
Cannon North American 
CaoaMrty Amencan & Gen 
Canal House Mb Amer GOi 
Cqna North Amrocan Gth 
Ctenca Med Amencan Gwth 
CunletoaDOn Worth Amencan 
Cnnm American 
Cram Canatbn fin 
CS America 

CU Ancnczi Gnjwth Ace 
Dantdm North Amencan 
Eagle Sts North AmetKU Ac 
EFM Amertcsi 
Engteh Trust Amman 
Eonably K Amencan 
Ecucy S Law North American 
FSC US Snuifar Cn S 
Fraeuy Am Spec Sts 
FrietaT Antatcai 
Fidelity American Eguty tac 
Fiamhngioa Amor Smlr Cos 
FranKingiai Amer Turman) 
Fnencs Pnw N Antencn 
fnents Pip» HA 5 stop 
TFS American Gth 
G Mahon Si Vncenl US Glh 
GAM Marti America 
Garaimre Amencan 
Ganmore Emenj Gth Amor 
Goven Amencan Gdi 
Gown Amencan tac 
GFfE North Amencro 
Gresham Norm Amencan e 

Gmtino American 5 

GT Amencan Spec Sas 6 

GT US & General S 


7 mteS 1902 Bib Gtt 


Aotrast Japan 
AEtaa Jem Grfr 
Albu Owbar Japan 
BaittoisUn tep & Gen 
Barclays Ua Jap Spec Sc 
Baitag Japan ffltr 
Bmg Japan 5um&o 
BGJatm 

I tatmpa Japan . 

Upahdty Far Easts Go 
Captai House Japan Gth 
C»n«l Metf Japan Gtt 

’ Coritotofabon Jean 
Cram Jy 
CS Japan 
CU Jem Gtt 


179.5 920 100 872 69 J<m Stt 

49 75 93 9 55 868 72 OtaWmfr <!«■) Sm Cog 

5445 872 123 31? 33 &« *>■ JaW l.SmaB CM 

31 64 95 6 1J 93 0 25 W* Smaitt tepaa Cos 

4J74 923 91 • — gj* Tokyo 

1390 950 21 90.4 37 . _ 

7903 96.1 9 87.6 65 FaK tty Mm Sp a& 

3104 935 65 007 107 ftwitog ai Jap S San 

247? 92.4 86 92.8 38 GetmoreJapW 

8061 95.4 15 765119 

4586 94 4 36 83.7 96 


Goren japan 
1 Grahnd Japan 


54.70 91 9 102 85 4 87 I GTJapan S 6en 


5613 919 79 94? 21 

175 5 9 2 4 86 783116 

1472 92.4 86 88.7 56 

6090 916 62 89 0 50 
39 30 923 91 96.6 II 

8099 94 4 36 922 31 

24 82 91.7 105 83 3 98 


ji Henderson .Japan 

763 116 Henderson Japan Spec Sfc 
88,7 56 m Stoma jjp Tech 

890 50 Wi Sjn oa J^an Genera 

9 «g II Hottom Japan 
92 ? 31 temes Cipd Japro tadex 
83 3 98 


5005 937 59 796 114 jffl.Jwn Spec 

2482 913 10S B8 4 60 LAS team 

2l?5 9*7 12 820 103 LaaraWto Japan IMM As 


1253 921 96 810105 L*B#-G tow* Japan 

992 2 77 I 118 Leri S ftnert Jtoan beta 
960 W 886 57 Uoyds teoan Or 
95? ?i 95.1 16 MMftan GGanwai A« 

91.1 113 89.4 47 MAG .Jap an SretrQa 

94.1 48 90 0 40 Mannte Japan ah 
012110 866 75 Jtaw Carte Jam 
903 110 957 13 Merao Jea» 

92.) 96 861 79 JWa»dJW.6tt 
883 122 894 <7 **** tepwi P»f 


94 7 33 1036 


MM Bnt Japan Smir Cos 


600 9502 941 190 728 172 I Manm Coffta income a Gtt 579 6281 958 104 9 £lB 25 I Jamei Caoel tod Spec Sts 629 6364 956 99 938 SI I Gimness Mahon N Amenca 652 


Bank of Ireland Capua! Gth 550 8693 947 182 *65 86 


Barclays Ura CapU 
Barclays Un Gmwh tec 
Barctoys Urn Leisure 
Barclays Ura Recover/ 
Barclays Urn Smir Cos 


650 9339 975 93 £80 69 

649 2352 968 137 902 51 
6.46 1164 989 36 607 125 

650 3170 P*2 56 87.0 81 
6.76 39.69 97.7 *3 733 170 


Banteys UwSpec Sns ta 650 WO 990 6S 789 139 

Banmj UK Gtt 575 6050 0:9 179 78 8 140 

BamglK Smaller Companies 5.75 89 39 98? 58 78 6 142 

BS British Glh 599 3020 07 5 93 754 1*2 

70raon9TO»vRa»*!y GIQ «» 939 192 S31 190 

t Brown Shrplfy Smaller Cos 613 1620 1003 1 1 626 187 

T BuAmasier Emwg Gtt 566 6262 97 3 10* Bib 91 

t Brionaster SmaHer Cos 603 1108 1010 5 620 114 

Cartfie General 473 153 5 953 171 920 34 

Ctonon Sraegs Opps 65i 48*4 977 32 776 147 

CraoWllv Gtt 6 GO 279.6 97 0 125 91 0 45 

TCapabliry spec Sirs 600 63.13 86 6 742 865 W 

tCapri House Smator Cos 538 ?798 97 9 71 82.5 103 

T Capri Hoose UK Gm 600 2161 97 5 93 87 4 76 

T CCF Sel UX Small Co 601 5238 101.3 2 — 

Ca Recovery 600 5182 97 0 125 822 112 

Chase Mgd S 6 C Spec Sits 5.51 5« 46 1015 3 7J 7 164 

TCJBCGih 5?3 1238 990 54 100.6 3 

Owe UK Gth 650 8096 99 5 21 K'J 32 

OS Eranun 603 1D13 1005 9 — 

T OS UK Gtt 607 1111 969 131 — 

City fincal Sipmeif Assets 500 51 16 97 ? 82 872 79 
0*T tt London Acine Assets 335 1819 94 7 182 883 65 
Cteneal Med Attgree Gwth 5 99 3539 991 30 976 9 

Ctencal Med Spec S4s 699 3147 963 154 66 9 1EC 

t Corirderanon Smafrer Cos 721 22 59 100 2 12 79 0 1 H 


Matheson UK tigh Inc 
Mavffcrrrer lnc 
1 1 ffcrasy Hnjh inc 
! r Mercury Inc 
Merfrn Jupder lnc 
McTOpai^an UK tac 
MGM ttgh lnc 
TUfCUro ttrtt YwW 
TMM But UK inc 
T MIA to com? S Glh 


£50 37 23 974 70 825 10S 
5 99 3559 958 104 918 3* 
677 SI37 S67 89 90? «7 
630 1206 S83 36 903 46 
599 914J 97 4 70 89.2 60 

599 6418 990 14 82? 109 
598 2162 990 14 W7 95 
652 2127 982 43 B99 53 
690 2755 97.6 66 877 76 

600 64 46 946 121 801 113 


h8 international Red 
Key imetnamam 
l&C bnema u pnai 
LAS International Gtt 
Larrenfen imeroahonal 
Ldn fi Mcr tatenononaJ 


*03 1326 959 86 84 1 I2J 

700 7933 96 4 65 93 3 48 

1.96 327.6 97 0 45 905 83 

601 4034 953 108 867 113 

600 6827 961 70 930 21 

660 4420 359 86 91.1 73 


93? 72 Mj 4 102 Morjy Sren Japan Tito 
94.9 26 884 53 New Court Jam 
94.1 48 795 115 NM Joan Sntr Cos 
93? 77 860 80 m Tokyo 
91? 102 831 109 J*""* JaP* 1 _ 

938 57 860 80 Berpeteal ^pan Gth 
:4J 93.1 74 874 66 Pn» Gap J apan 

33 866 120 807 107 ftw»*MBl Japan 

43 94? 41 99.1 6 Ftori Ufe Jap tad Tcatoll 

29 100? I 972 9 Royal London Jqm Gth 

22 94.1 48 87 4 66 Royal Turn PPT Japan 

65 924 86 93? 24 S4P Japan Gth 

65 902 110 91? 34 SfiP JjPta Sn. Cos 

97.0 6 87 4 66 Sanjd-Tbnnwn Japan 
932 12 924 30 Shrader Jam Srofr Cos 

942 41 B3.| 10O Schrader Tokyo 
912110 872 0 Scol Bri Japan 

943 41 967 10 fcoijkn Japan 

076 3 932 23 Stewart tawy Japan 

93 0 77 849 02 Sun Ufe Jaoan Glh 
97.4 4 848 % Tanm Japan fi General 
913 108 882 62 ' m J*® 1 “1 

907 115 858 84 «WW Japan Glh _ 


t Mortal Grcn UK EwtncGM 1234 M3 36 932 19 


T Murray Ecuitv irar 
Wav Court UK E*nly lnc 
T Newton lnc 
t NM lnc 

t Norwich UK EOity tat 
Pearl lnc 
Pearl UK Inc 
Perpetual he 
t Frofflir High tac 
Prov Cap uk H j Emmy 
T Refuge Equity lnc 
Regency Ufe Bnusn inc 
Royal Life High inc 


632 6733 98 0 54 9L0 43 

74! 12027 93.4 31 93 1 20 

5.96 1571 100 1 5 101.8 1 

625 5033 957 108 850 103 

600 104.58 973 79 94.7 11 

595 190 1 97 4 70 92S 25 

600 5059 9*5 27 9TO 43 

650 24010 949 116 863 85 

599 9170 97? 63 832 60 

800 7209 97.4 70 858 93 

65 2 2410 9* 0 54 — 

5 99 6351 98.6 21 939 15 

849 1133 9*2 4J 85.8 93 


Legal fi General aottal Gtt 6.00 5531 944 127 662 117 
Legal fi General Overseas £9 600 97 #t 970 45 902 87 

Lloyds bffl Technology 5?0 2i7«7 932 143 910 75 

Lloyds WOrWmle Gtt 500 23510 £60 61 920 62 

M4G inJemattnul Gtt 610 5170 94 4 177 970 62 

597 1508 913 146 *4 1125 

579 6734 99 3 4 1086 4 

598 14")0 973 2! 909 77 


Hambras Ctovun 5.74 au.iu »<■•» 4 no a •*: “ »*■»»•• 

Hambras Worth Amenan 57S 7206 913 188 88? 62 JR japan Gtt 

Henderson Am Sm Cos 701 48 4 907 115 858 84 WWW Japan Glh 

Henderson Amencto Recovery 612 116.45 SO? 114 85 4 87 w *fflw Japan Sm CBS 

Henderson N American 6.07 15355 938 57 86* 72 Sector Amge/ToWs 

Hrtl Samuel Dofrar 6.49 215 1 948 35 859 BZ 


Man litre totem jTwnal Gill 
Mann Cume tod Grn 
Mayhoaw tod Leaden; 


Mated Invest Herein Fund 7.99 S7£6 973 40 too 7 14 


t Royal Lonoon too fi Glh 602 1450 S6 6 94 92.4 31 


T CU Gamnv 
tCll Charter spec &rs 


600 3580 97 9 71 793 137 
600 WOO 971 122 7E4 157 


Dawnsww UK Small C» 614 1277 0 93 « 53 756 160 

Druneianfl Glon Pcrtfnho 798 44 00 981157 0Ou 131 

Pwmflm Brush Gtt 600 194 6 97.6 90 85 5 94 

TEatte Star Enwianmtl Otto 600 £7 20 99 5 ?1 1050 1 

7 Eagle Stai UK Gtt 598 157 4 97 7 82 940 23 

EFM Casual 587 1340 95 4 170 720 175 

Elton Trim 885 1683 573 10* *81 86 

7 Eqaapte Spec Sits 500 11012 980 « M2 103 

t Ecudvfi Law&« Ensnare600 52 56 969 I3i 938 25 

Easier Cancel GBt 6 76 M16 972 «7 86* 83 

FSC UK Gin 610 7916 97 7 62 8S9 60 

5?J 5710 1022 1 — 


Royal Trust Eqtrev lnc 
Royal TnEr me 
T SSP High Return 
T SfiP f*gh Yield 
7S4P Scorwfrfc 
t SfiP Smarter CoS lnc 
SSW toe 
Schroder frie 
Sceranr UK Ecwty tac 
t Scol Equii ttgn lnc 
Scol Tifcr Income Plus 
T San Widows Hflh toe 
T Soverpgit lnc 


854 I2fl4 577 63 935 16 

700 23880 988 16 74 6 116 

5 98 247 5 98 6 21 MO 65 

6 * 228 5 99 6 8 9l3 33 

5 9 7 2 34? 9a2 43 96.0 6 

598 229 1 98 6 21 802 112 

54b 1039 93? «3 929 22 

600 255B 98? 36 31.1 40 

5W 3 A 1 J 974 70 821 110 

6 25 28 82 98 4 31 9 f7 37 

6W 6510 971 81 89? W 

635 163 1 991 1? 85.1 102 

f.?6 4\J4 9*2 43 910 43 


Siarautt Lrte UK Eguty H 1 598 3666 99.1 51 91 1 40 


Mercury intemaronal 
nfrifto Jupiter Ecotocr 
Mertm Jupiter ton Gtt 
Mnropntarei Gtatnl 6m 
MGM toll Equity Gtt 
Midland Ini 1 High si 
Upland Mraai Gth 
MiM Bm iml Gtt 
UIM Bnt tod Le«ure 
MM 0m tail Recovery 
MLA Emem Martels 
MLA imenuljcnai 
Morgan Gren ind Gtt 
Murray Olympiad 
T Newton Geneial 
T Newton Global 
NM mremaMjral 
NM Spec Sns. 

Norwich mnsnahonal 
NPI Overseas Age 
HR vrtttmmte Acc 
Peer) towraanonai Emtoy 
Perpetual mr Emerg Co s 


6 07 309 5 965 a WO 125 
600 5248 97 7 25 885 103 

599 W98 973 31 821 133 

600 44 09 P90 17 P-36 102 

600 5572 959 *5 906 61 

650 6039 973 31 924 57 

650 1218 96 2 7* 863 117 

587 4275 952 111 637 127 

5« 1964 939 139 810 135 

583 3104 95 5 63 626 132 

600 3963 990 7 1130 2 
6 CO 6732 959 116 963 32 
6?5 161.0 95 3 48 91 7 68 
60s 4912 952 103 850 122 
563 liB.Q 09* 8 — 

59* 2465 969 48 1044 B 

678 28 64 96 0 81 90 6 £1 

697 2945 954 105 783 139 
6 00 16127 54 5 176 £05 *3 

600 965 4 95 8 53 960 23 

600 8232 964 65 9a.5 42 

C93 1527 959 SO 93 6 56 

651 10319 96 8 53 1004 15 


Hrtl Samuel Oofrar 6.49 215 1 948 35 85 9 82 

Hill Samuti US SmaBti Cm 6.4& 31J4 888 121 918 18 

Hoitwm North Amencan 8.50 8906 92? 85 818 105 

James Capei Amencan Index 626 130? 94.4 36 89 9 41 

James Cape) N Amencan 629 278? 94 1 48 85? 84 

K8 Amencan Snvi Cos 600 "" n,,e «• « 

KB N Amencan 800 

LAS N Amencro Eoitoy 602 

laart Nortt Amencai 07* 

Ldn fi Mu Araencro 660 


n 1094 68 
15 114.4-3? 
39 1340 . 1 
94 TfU'28 
25 1M2 39 
3 13L7 3 
19.11M 33 

WS?~«2 
tOO 1131 41 
8 TK5 38 
-8 1006 705 
13 1153 3? 
94 108 1 77 
29 1208 18 
78 1109 56 
69 10L9102 
S4 tOSUS 7t 
. 9 120.1 17 
« 995 107 
■33 1105 » 
.65 110 0 83 I 
-0 1084 76 
43 1127 48 
89 1034 98 
91 109 JB Gfi 
45 1107 58 
94 102 ? in 
7B VRJQ 93 
104 — 

994 17 119.6 19 
0£ 15 121.1 15 
0? 10 1129 48 
987 39 111.6 53 
96? 10 -1069 52 
0.1- 25 1173 22 
97? 68 1057 91 
97i1 0 107.B .80 
080 se 1182 25 
97.0 75 1127 48 
979-61 110.1 62 
01 25 1112. 54 

100.7 5 1304 4 

987 30 1132 45 
983 45-106.1 77 
97.0 79 TIOil 83 
96? 0 1121 52 

95.7 108 1082 0 
1004 6 1257 7 

0? 52 1143 35 
98? 45 115.1 33 
8*3110 1183 27' 
S3 55 1063 88 

988 82 1102 60 
S3 113 .1124 M 


99.19 942 37 
1663 931 50 
1462 09 69 
1455. SUB 39 
190? 925 5b 
59 j8& 967 20 

169.4 933 44 

1662 01 26 
2853 96.7 20 
10l.fi .923 jSS 
5333 917 83 
2336 966 23 
44.40 943 .32 
2530 922 57 

2833 947 33 

132.4 935 42 
39.06 856 27 

12556 S3 17 
3953 TO4.0 2 

7353 10Q6 fi 
185? 913 61 
1623 93.1 SO 

8559 94.4 35 

1732 987 13 

18458 38? 15 
7332 072 18 
1543 943 38 
42140 093 10 

17238 91.1 68- 

176? 913 61 

7120 840 0 

1424 030 52 — 

13351 05 70 711 58 

63 73 88? 71 59 3 69 

4309 964 24 ,972 13 

233.0 104 8 1193 6 

52.47 955 ?3 773 .40 

4396 07 20 B1CT 34 

58.48 920 56 S3 62 

33.15 09 73 605 67 

9699 91.5 85 703 80- 
450 923 59 66.fr.84 

I4&£ 0.1 12 969 IS 

3675 917 63 — 

4231 9S2 29 — 

1997 tf.I 18 875 23 

3113 915 65 71.1 SB 

3591 SIS 42 739 50 

3958 HW4 3 1075 9 

6350 aso 72 .597 n 

22037 98? 15 798 S 

456.1 1029 4 177.4 1 

84.01 94.7 33 877 a 

76.70 923 53 — 

IS137 95? 29 1173 7 

9B33 *3 25 .71? 55 

6435 93.2 48 703 58 

71.42 927 54 633 66 

1252 934 45 75.1 46 

1095 93? 48 77? 42 

115.1 92? a 783 43 

2112 101.1 5 113? 8 

74.81 1005 7 S.1 14. 

4533 1030 3 174.7 2 

8234 953 31 063 25 

5735 S3? 47- 708 58 

5474 914 45.732 51. 

118? 905 74 ICD7-70 

6.50 10231 937 40 . 758 44 

7.10 107 913-'67 713 54- 

533 8184 93.7.40 872 24 

649 2293 993 11 869 2S 

R48 3776 104.1 1 1239 5 
60 — 0t 73 8*5 U 


jowri »y«r 
Satad pri w* ** ^ 


ryiMMQD rTY & ENERGY { 

■ .. _ __ can ims 1011 22 823 21 

jttfieyCommndiy sa*^ era J(E4 t7 91.4 n 

Arted3roMrMaUo4Com6® w.o 3 1285 1 

BG Energy IS Sgi UBS 13 «5, 8 

EFM Rosonms _ |« «« «33 IS MW < 

■maos* O MJ**"™ * |S 5777 HJ46 W 963 3 

tw •SlSJfff In an HB.0 T 912 1J. 

. janp Cairi Bt M & ■» _ gjg acru 1031 rt 830 22, 

llawti B»a>. W. ___ ®2 ®6 23 SSO.. H. 

MM comowwy 8 Stneri |« %£ 1QS8 2 86? 29 

•HfiG Gow «■«»*»- Sf, 1013 21 » 

waran Ju pri 5S 33 78 »ifr 0 9M S 

MW era Omna«y Sara KKB 8 87.4 ia 

MM Bnt 60M w« UJS5 5 87.1 tflt 

NMGcPd noo 1 893 17 

MS 1043 »0 12 

Royal TnrtPPT Go« ^ SS ,G2 2 « »9 * 

Stf CPWIOW_ as S 10.7 9 MU 2 

G0 JSS 1053 5 9*5 lO 

55P Son * &£*«"» 1C53 4 904 IS 

■ISSr^Qfttn^S IS xS 1034 14 K 2 - O 

5™*" cm 7519 1C45 12 s?4 T. 


IS 1U9 1023 18. 683-24. 

aasss »* -«» a m » ■ 

r IRNANCUU. * PROPEBTV "1 




CoratoB Prarity aw« 

sS 2725 »5 7 €43 17 

g E i£2S^» 5 S« fa ^ ffi «B{ 

IS 947 W 847 9 

848 098 949 17 926 2 

K^_?renri Hnanare JK? 965 4 0.1 3. 

jiwa'MBmMnfratM 588 6148 980 1 68-7 15 

SSS.'SeSffipSSto 1 “ 850 9M 8 »? 10 - 

SPtaMS tuna 536 717.4 S42 19 8« 5 

wS 599 1893 953 14 * 


B£9 5774 95 9 12 KB » 

ESO 6438 971 3 622 6, 

II B A JB s 

II ns 11 ’i 973 1 

IS 2725 05 7 €43 17 




Taioei Fwocol 


70, 41.78 552 IS 773 11 
718 31.07 01 10 TW *2 
& 43W M? 2 ®0 16 . 


I_ . MONEY MARKET . \ , 

jfifiia Uonev POO 5207 1008 3 ' 

^SScSiUntTB 00 11377 1003 2 1109 2: 

MUM uowr btortet Inc 1.48 *® | * 

Pino Cap UK Money MarM inc20 510 S — 

Itoare Tma PPT HW 521 78.43 1013 1 W57 9 

WMngoree Wy ResaW 002 5541 101 4 m3 1 

Seeri Antnpt/Tetob l« — fr 073 4 

1 CONVERTIBLES "" I 


Qrobar Com & G4t 610 3736 W « {SB 1 

Ann CoukiMOb 574 4821 %4 6 633 3 

-eGCorwrtttofi Gemri 630 4730 »1 W 9 

ftowii Shptey Convert & Gen 614 2131 ^3 B 785 7 

EFH QnnrtWes 50 2333 972 5 843 2 

Mem GWri CnnrenWo SH 2171 9<M gj 3 

FtanHntkm Canwubte 5Sl 107? 98.0 3 793 6 

Pmac CtmnmUe fi at 633 1145 1W* 1 | 

Royal Tmst BxfltLfi CoroUMo 731 ^37 0.7 7 7Z9 8 

grated Gaori Oelender 538 3831 0? 2 |69 1 ! 

Wndsor GomertSde fi Eqvtf 617 «■« 32.1 11 B72 10 

.Sector iwwmti/lotois 8.1S — 963 T1 IM 71 


) ~: MANAGED | 

Yearly figures in ihte section am based oo 
offar b> bid prices wttwut income minvested. 


Abbey Managed Seres 4 
Ahbty Setaw Senes 2 
Atonal Managed Gtt 

Atom* Managed Inc 
Aamtifa Mat 
AEtaa Lite 3-tray Rad 
-AEtoLtid A-Sqvrel 
AEtna Ua B-ftaar . 
AEtaa Lite C-On3 
ABnbtoDOoti 
«Bna LAKtap 
AEtaa L4a Mgd- 
MUqf HUtoSr Bnr 


SOI 4664 03 Si 85? 75 
5.02.3673 98.7 0 943 68 
50 38130 96.4 162 971 40 
5.00 14138 973 10 850 162 
501 1*8 1 909 43 953 64 
-00 4)632 98? 63 970 41 
&02 1473 109 5 1fi45 4 
501 1432 989 43 844 0 

501 17.02 967156 836 IS 

503 1531 97.1 144 85615* 

5® 4343 96? IM 05 167 

&W23B74 984 78 053 10 
439 7743 04 28 958 64 


AflriOnlw7tam»llaaD&03 2175 973 149 92-1 115 
Ataod Owtac Red .50 703 979 IQS 962 60 , 

AmedeaiUl-Aiphi IM M4 W83 - W4T62 . 836 165 , 

tana Ute PmmieiUgd sm lW3 '987 » 934 73 j 
Btebyttond SIB 4753 01 92 00 146. 

Bamtays Life mu 502 39R5 910 99 817 148 

Btacir Horse'Mgd Bar . 500 35255 983 51 37.4.37 . 

flnannc Ugd 50i 3983 910 99 — 

CnfiUUqd 402 2373 03 99 913124 

CanfrtoWM Uffl 500 250.1 973 105 913 125 . 

CamoP2nd Mgd ■ S51 339? B7.6125 944 99 j 

Canpg 2nd llsiaged 2 535 1431 07 .55 953 64 

Cretan dal Managed 4 , 549 t597 972105.353 28 . 

OCL.Mfrl . 50 472 332 » *3310 • 

Odcbtp BftttotUgd 503 2545 37 '03.31 t 


Creuou M ManfrMd 4 
cCLUgd 

Odcotp BA ttotUgd 


Oty re Vest Batrocad M0 'SXrXBA . Sfifr^Sfr 

CKy re Wist Cooririlnugsra aga? 973 116 _ 

OencaUfidetoy 0*7 503 1(83 0.1 W 03.118 . 

Oencaf/Fritor saprtdn ' sm .2043 g*j 92 958-64 , 

Cotarul MreriJKgd .. &02OUB 973 125 022114 ~ 

CoabrinHMUkJtonagedl40 8795 05 32 — 

comm ma 5 . 02 . ?ms. 03 . 0-98? a 

qknmm^ • Im mo- at r 37 02 32 

CMawn unimto 499 2313 1002 12 9ZO710 

Owen Und - : 40 42fijr 975137 905137 ' 

Qaeader Mnured PCrf 549 1156 997 18 08.44. 

Cmadv tetamnx Ph» S54 1T74 99.4 2B WIO -15 

Oosader Wth-Rofits Fond 547 1272 107 -fr *043- 6 -. 

CUfrlgd . 502 3841 872142 9t3 1»- 

OJ Hoserw Mgd • 50fr 174.1 987 * 917 121 
mvnmugs ' . 502 7283- 07 12*- w 
Eagle Stv Adaenuroos SU2 1729 957 185 873.154 

Ee#t.Sar Bfrp Chip 505 1757 983 69 93.7 98 

Eagto SBr'tofimaace 50S 191.1 97.1 M4 04 102 

Economic tos Co Mgs SJB 12*3 9M ffl 972 39 

EMM su ed Poittcfa 5.® 523 0.1 .m...XM T» ' 
fitori*Life Mgd 501 *90? 01 92 MS 8?: 

&Mty * Law Bafrrnctd .4.0 505 973 131 976 36 

feMty.fi LawOwrartautj 40 ,\1&* 1£9 0* 52 . 

Eowty 4 law Bescnnr . 4J0 70S OftT fr MtO 15 5 

FnendS-RowM Mgd 502 2227 97:3 139. 964 ,52 
G&S IWflrrnk 250GS6.17 fOBS 5 TU8 I 

Greta M*T r5® 471Q 929 172.842163 

M (tad 40 1613 973115 963 56 

Gen PM Berry U .50 OBJ 03 64 08 44 

Ban PM CS Dbdrfr Mtan 52* 01BZ3 t31 04 151 


973 .116 05 *42 
0.1 IM aztriiB 


Sun Alliance Eguty tac 


7.QQ 7214 986 94 86'3 M 


Sun Lee o) Canada Uh lnc 650 3655 94* 118 *54 97 


T Fzmdy Trust 
Rdetov Famous Names 
Firjesty Recovery 
T Fnfcity Spec Sd% 

T Frartatagian Capsal 
T Framfcigton SmaHer Cos 
Fronds Prov Stewardship 
t FS Balanced Gth 
tFS Seracc CoS 
Gamrtae BMrsh Glh 
Gretmora UK Sctecr Opus 
Ganmore UK Snran Cos 
GterUrtres lira Opps 
t Goven Gnat Brash coo 
T Gown UK Small Ces 
t Goven UK Spec Oms. 
t GrartriiB Smarter Cos 
GfiE Grawm Edinfy 
GRE Smaller Cos 
Gnsftsm UK r* 

Grtaimd EouCy 
t GT UK CapiCi 
t GT uk Sm Suuibon 


Gumnes Manon T B U3M 735 162 l UBS 6 535 105 

Hamtao-Genoaii UK Gm 5 TO 7415 971) 125 51^ 29 

HambrM Smaia C« 59') J’ 75 975 76 7»fi f-4 

t HaraBios UK New ijenerapdfl 5 99 4209 554 15) ai 4 1*7 

Henderson Best ol Bniisn 652 a*S 969 m 025 rt 

Henderson Spec Sfis 701 2I49B 97JID5 ft* IM 

HK Samuel Capital 6 48 I23 3 &Ji]t)i 879 70 

toil Samuel Seatoty 649 259 7 95 S 168 £21 6S 

ton Samuel Sm Cd* 650 07*6 W 2 199 636 126 

tod Sanrati Suer Sis 648 US? $4 4 tf.5 B29 107 

T Hdl Samuel UK Enwg Cos 648 « 08 l 94 2 187 7 |4 177 

Hoi bom Small Comparers 64) :o 9t 939 ;-6 B5fi 9r 


t. TO 5160 

9?2 56 

905 

49 

6 77 Z9*a 

97-: 197 

728 

172 

6 77 3578 

972 117 

851 

98 

597 KM 

97 7 6? 

7S3 

I4Q 

593 5594 

97 5 93 

78 n 

144 

6 00 264.08 

993 17 

6/9 

TO 

6 OO 80 16 

931 M 

922 

33 

6 00 66 05 

96 5 1<6 

799 

13? 

675 32.14 

590 M 

94H 

1) 

&TO 100 54 

H8 44 

776 

147 

675 101B3 

954 J4 

764 

157 

666 113 7 

93 6 48 

814 

117 

651 <954 

979 71 

111 7 

? 

6<9 47 73 

99 4 24 

85 3 

97 

75* 170 10 

99 6 TO 

813 

lift 

599 7746 

9*4 5J 

aio 

174 

549 272 4 

9:6 153 

Si 7 

116 

549 2fi07 

963 171 

no 

171 

671 24 M 

%6 137 

ni? 

40 

<99 1510 

96 3 TO? 

67 6 

6 

653 15010 

965 1FB 

Si 6 

IQ? 

651 £993 

97 T 10.9 

Si 3 

:i9 

6it 2152 

SS9 36 

767 

154 


T Sun Life Uh tac 
Target lnc 
T it? tocame Gtt 
T T58 Etta toe 
Tintefr Inc 

U7AM Ftwe Home me 
Wtdrtr,- lnc 
Wtolcor Im; 

7 YU IM UK EdJrtV tac 
Sector Amage/Tntats 


651 4862 974 70 872 80 
699 HB2 93 3 36 81 5 111 
6® 072 WO 54 893 M 

6TO17IS8 2*5 21 90.7 47 

567 8193 £7 3 60 £3 5 16 
5 97 1*2 7 99 5 9 M3 52 
647 1X16 9* 1 Si 898 54 

618 75*6 754 114 

655 64*6 964 10 90 4 51 
E0 — 973 125 883 121 


Penwuai tatemabonal Grow 650 356 14 96 1 78 90 4 66 
T Perwiual PEP Gtt fitat 651 62.13 Mfr 2 — 

Perpetual World Recovery 650 21700 98 0 17 £37 S7 


Perperjal World Reawery 
Praiibc Inremjijtmi 
Praiihc Tocwctogy 
Pne.' Ca '.Wiutnirit 
Pro. Mutual '.‘as 
Royal Ute iml Gtt 


597 1670 9T.4 65 9)6 18 

596 1425 90 4 152 04 2 45 
6*3 11280 97 7 25 1014 12 
5 99 5263 949 121 653 121 
&I2 4524 94 7 12T 600 127 


Rcrral Ufe mri Suairfahva 5 ■» 45 a 971 4 ; 920 63 
Royal Tpja Interraunui 6 5* 69 05 &J i 127 8 t 1 131 

Rova Trust VMflthnCe Aipta 620 6J32 95 1 73 933 ie 

SfiP Capa! 559 116 3 94 7 122 631 130 

SfiP Pie* TWmolocv 5-a 703 5 907 151 83 9 59 


UK BALANCED 


5AP Setter kdematDri 
SiP Unt«ri GBt 
SSW Macmwn 


559 116 3 94 7 122 631 130 
553 703 5 90 7 157 839 S9 
599 1073 Ml 6 520 62 
5?6 1105 S5 6 99 571 110 
722 1070 994 3 — 


talramgm toe 
T P’lwi Shpkv togh Inc 
Bream SmoteY tiltl l« 


602 52.15 935 37 65 1 2B 

610 80 90 98 5 14 62 6 35 

617 9192 96 3 32 85 6 27 


Schrader 0 seas Smlr Cos fl 600 7 f 4 fi 979 20 1W5 5 

Schrader Onuses Eg Accibi 5 55 t?*7 960 Bt 96 0 23 

SoraiUa G 106 # Gth £W 4334 960 El 206 73 

5«rt Eoun Ira <45 2020 983 !< 103 2 6 


Bjcteranrer High tacome Pen 3 51 <SM 975 24 940 


Scot Ecun 7«n 
t Sen Eourt UK Citibal 


£64 43 34 960 El 208 73 
<45 20:a 98 3 14 1032 6 

625 £43? 526 147 1025 11 
6E0 25 5: 97 9 20 _ 


39 «'£ *1 1 Sot Era* Wmce Tac Pert 645 34 % *373 31 308 76 


TCantaitty tacomo fi Gan 600 3309 W 7 34 8* 2 15 


&gnj UK lnc 
T CS UK toe 


650 67 55 994 
6 00 1092 99 1 


Clerical Med Relnemera tac £99 23 43 97 5 2* 873 22 


T HciDom Spec Stations 
THottwro Utt Glh 
James Capet Caudal 
KB 5mreie> Cos 
KB UK Equty- Glh 
T Key E tatty fi General 
T Kev Smaito Cos 
T LAS UK Saury 
Lamsttin Glh 
Lsarfl UK Capri 
Lnrd UK Small Cm Gift 
Legal & General Ferny 


648 <081 94 2 187 7l< 177 

6 49 70 31 93 9 2-6 85fi 97 

649 £5:S 958 162 «l l 12) 

6 50 10240 972 117 t* | *5 
6 30 4**4 995 21 912 42 

597 1C9* 9*5 48 7?£ 1£6 
600 K16 96 5 146 920 J4 
BOO 5926 9J4 tsi 7S5 IJ4 

F51 5?£3 956 U2 759 132 

600 71 tj 97 3 75 9 m5 5 

602 W2 4 999 15 95 5 15 

18* 2661 95 5 ter 5i 0 45 

4«) 760< %s 4* 5.1*126 

599 368 1 978 76 95) 17 


Legal & General Ecuiy 599 368 1 978 76 95 ) 17 

Legal 6 General UK Retw-wv fiw 5950 939 36 953 17 

Legs' & General UK Soec 6<!l gj 5 ? 9*4 t«: 825 


Ctaorare WtaiaMnc *51 4100 53 0 38 «1 28 

Confejcrafion Hhpi inr 5 99 2736 592 9 918 10 

CU McnMv Income PhB 600 4291 950 26 640 37 

EFM togn Bi5ir*j«jn £88 1625 £67 00 *60 25 

Equ-ty 1 Um Bra FndJiurHs 60> 5539 969 26 532 7 

T FS High fa Yield 5 J8 3140 99 4 5 95 S 3 

G4M High hx 600 110.79 89 6 29 83? K 

Can mure Etora lnc 63) 65.12 100 1 2 Bit 9 

T Gartmcne High toe 6<9 3193 9E 9 26 649 30 

GfCrturtd Emftsii lx 525 <9B0 981 17 88 3 17 

HeniMson Ertra lnc 634 25121 S3 7 12 *76 20 

HoiDcon ritgn lnc. 6<9 79.32 99 7 3 85 7 26 

KBEtorataJ 6')t 5231 98 6 13 92.4 9 

They Hum Inr 574 146 10 99 7 3 333 32 

Uoetis Etoia tor 500 216.60 994 5 M2 2 

Ujrtut Caime togh YietS 5 0 50 65 96 8 29 94 3 5 

Midland Edna High HC *50 69 08 9 3 4 IS £76 20 

t NM Bnt Extra tac 557 79 08 9<2 35 500 15 

NM Eton tac 6 30 69 36 95 8 33 80 1 26 

Penwual togn hr 651 5767 990 10 906 J2 

Prolific Ertrt) lnc 601 1400 93 8 11 ej 7 19 

Rwal LttniJW togh tac 5» 1132 97 6 23 W: 14 

Fnval Tiufl rtoh VuJd 695 118 6 1017 t SOO 12 

TSiPtoc £99 1143 94 0 3fi 573 22 

Sm Life Creuial Pi'jteciot 651 3036 980 19 963 1 

Suit Lie Mgd High Yield 650 6902 97 7 21 669 24 

Sun Life Mgc he fi Clh 650 64 90 98 2 t6 69 4 fo 

Tliofrnuai UK Holt Yle-'d 623 4284 96 7 30 8JJ 32 , 

Th.w Cwsihec Balanced Port 6 00 10279 991 8 — 

TR incDiap Monniv 539 54.60 97.7 21 TO 4 3? 

Sector Aeerafe/Tatata 838 — 974 39 884 37 

I GILT & FIXED INTEREST 1 


Ltayds Smlr Cos Ftyc 
Lloyds UK Gift 
T» & S UK Sd< PWT 
UfiS Compound Eta 
t MfiG Hccovere Acs 
t M&G Stab Cos 
Mamlrff UK Smarter Cos 

Mart* Cume UK Gm 

t Msitury Rkoihv 

t Mtecwv UK SnCr Cos 
Mcrtei Jutstei Spec Sis 
Uempakun ux tra 
MGM Spec Snuauns Glh 
f Kte'sKf Bnbeft 
t Midland Casual 
T tsateod Smaltyr Cos 
t HM EM fit BntKh Cos 
MM But Rupert Crtrtcs 
t MM Bm SnaMct Cos 
f LOT Bnt UK Glh 


590 2 M?I £j 1 30 313 122 
4 99 70 99 9.15 44 is 

6 50 133 *0 97 4 104 — 

f« 6705 ?ag a ^ 
516 <500 970 125 839 £0 
586 5640 101.1 i 823 108 

692 1375 933 1 71 70 0 179 

5 79 £5 29 94 6 184 B20 IM 

625 265 4 975 93 776M- 

626 47 6 < 93 5 l95 74 9 163 

599 36 58 98 4 £3 *93 56 

600 5*62 976 90 fio.0 .99 

598 3192 936 19-1 614 1*3 

65(i 6fir5 374 104 9?o ip 

6.51 in 3 94 e 1*0 eai irs 

6 46 151 f 96 2 :35 719 176 

729 40.73 9601W 8 S 1 S? 

640 6395 w 99n j 

5*7 2517 561 157 *78 131 

688 43SB 979 ?| £72 79 


Scot Life ItartCwitfi Ak 653 7223 930 144 92.3 M 

Seal Mut frrtl Gtt 6G3 1594 57 5 29 99 0 25 

Sent Mui lYMftnce VcMaiT 6 WJ 7i ;‘3 555 6 3 96 0 21 

Scot WnU'JiS Grooal 522 159 7 St 5 « 97 6 25 

SowreKtt Internal tana) 6 24 69 ?9 56 3 70 IM 3 12 

Swap figs 624 6050 W u 53 966 29 

SireKard Life Uijd 589 2512 “79 ;o 947 4] 

Soreard Lite G Seas Lnr Cos 7S2 2 :* 2 950 116 *J3 129 
Sun Artueice Wtutawme Teca 700 E0I6 58 7 9 90! 89 

Sun Lite to'jtl Gtt 651 6933 5£ 5 107 92? 62 

Sun Lite ot carata VHirthide 651 23 71 5J3 wi 83 4 IM 

Target Octal Oops 700 7:52 £5 3 TO Ml 89 

Iregta •Wortcjifrte Carnal 7774 5*9 43 cs? 116 

Templeton tMui Grown tac 6J0 119 36 96 7 5 ? 93? 4* 1 


KB N Amencan BOO 

LAS N Amancro Emrey 602 
leam North Amentret 07* 

. Ldn & Mu Anwncat 6B0 
Legal fi General N Amencan 600 
limits N Amer Sm Cos Rec 500 
LWrd5 H Amenca & Gen 600 
r.ifiG Amer Sn* Cos 548 
MfiG Amencrei fi General Are 5 41 
(Af.G American Recovery 545 
r.Iantojic North Amentan 600 
Mamn Cone N Amend 5 78 
rjeicuv Amer Grah 625 

fiVcwy Ama lnc 615 

Mraauy Amer Srtdr Cos 625 

Mertn Joow Amencan Cap 591 

MGM North Amencan Ob 539 
Mtettad Nonh Amenca 647 
1.HM Bm Amentan Glh 023 
WM Bnt US Snafret Cos 587 

MlA American 539 

Morgan I>en US Eo Ind Trckr 5*0 
Morgan Gum >JS Gm 6.02 

Murray Amencan Inc 567 

New Court Amenca 693 

New Court Cream Sn* Co *92 
NM Amenran 622 

NSl US Smaller Cos 649 

NoTweft N Amencan 6 to 

Normal Ntt Amer Sm Co *00 

NPI Americas Acc 598 

Peraeiuai American Gth 651 

Praut'C Amentan lnc 59i9 

PTdTJic North Amer 614 

Prav Cap N American SS7 

Prav Miem N Amentan 600 

Royal We ItartM Slates 6M 

Royal Lonttan Amer 15ft 600 

Royal Trust PPT Canada 522 

Roy* Tran PPT US 522 

SfiP Amercj lnc & Glh 599 

SfiP Amencan Smarter Ccfs 599 

SfiP LIS Glh 599 

SfiW Amman 54S 

Sctirocer American 597 

Son Equrt Amencai 591 

Seal Lite Amencan Are GOi 

Scot Mut N Amencan 604 

Scar meows N Amer 622 

Strop am Lite w American 575 

Siewart hfwy American 030 

Sun Alliance North Amova 7.00 


923 85 813105 
94.4 36 8S9 41 
941 48 *53 84 FARi 

926 84 904 37 . 

943 81 883 81 Abtrast Paolic 

SS’SS S.f’3 sFIS? 

956 13 fr»3 17 


FAR-EAST INCLUDING JAPAN' 


w ^ «WttItaP#liC 

S^r Be* Com Far Easr 


936 62 976 


Brown Stwrter Orent 


rariS nog J? cremreto^r" 

SI'S ml M Ogna Part* 6th 
321 96 601 112 Baltic Star Far Fjtsf 

mi o, iimn c 


g3 % 'SSjj £ fagfeh,Tma Far Eaa 

Si ?! n!iz? SS '4t£ n,a * 

SI ^ £1 f 3 . waty Japan smta Cn 

S fS SH S sjfyjjwfc** 

SJR «3 « sSSttPfrlfcte 

SI 11 ? Si 'll Go«aPariBSBWw 

«9 * Son* 

I I a s S35Sff“Jf 

I * sssaun. 

95? 17 89.5 48 pu Sanuei Fv East 

g? « >55 » 355c!ri%totss 

Si 2? 893 43 M Pacific 

“ H Jl — IAS C« Fttrj 

«n « St S Uraitl Japan & Pac*e Hb 
ri Si n5 Lew 8 General Far East • 
mit?n «« S Lb** PBotic Baan 

yi-^ llU (HO 9o M£C Fv Fvd 

93 4 66 806 110 

ill HI SsrEr. 

SI ® M« Bnt Faf East 


Son trie Amentan Gtt 
Target Amencm Eagto 
Thmnton Amefican (Kys 
TR Amercan Gth 
TSB Amencan 
Ward ley Amman 
Wacerlev Canadian 
Sector Arrerage/Tobls 


32? 95 KB 84 

Si S S S SBIfl 

953 9 Bisftp- 

as ss 

U 5 ,s a? | Kteiafr 

* mb S P"«c»€ast 
« mq S Royal We Paata Baan 
073 q? w K SfiPEasJteowwy 
94 0 U Ssn n MW fa-fa? 

ssi«! j? isra.’SK""*' 

92.4 86 90 9 35 WdinwSolic 
93 1 96 95.8 14 

964 6 94 8 18 s£)5^F*EJBt 

9IJ105 1^7 ^ Harmon Fre Eag OfflB 
634 4701 943 41 886 57 '* 

*5 5J W 

601 4527 96 7 6 81 3 W 

6J» — 915 123 883 121 SorenTtaeng^oW* 


39 W63 8 

71 86F 38 
36 86.4 38 
44 860 33 
35 873 37 
51 92.1 27 
14 TOM 7 

38 812 30 
27 820 46 
11 99.4 21 
29 105.fr -12 
57 783 53 
42 995 18 
29 753 31 

7 1110 4 

39 fiS.4 35 
5 1127 2 

. 4 955 18 
1 122.0 1 
55 8&4 35 

2 11U 3 

22 91.6 29 
57 78.1 54. 
13 1060 TO 
48 903 31 

8 820 '28 
20 1013 .Ifi 
29 85.7 41 
55 760 57 
■44 813 48 
S3 757 58 
54- 82.7 -45 

8 105.7 IV 
59 76.1 36 
42 83.4 25. 

3 1092 6 

18 323 26 
20-1024 15 
27 995 18 
34 850 <3 
52- 853 39 

19 978 22 
46 -953 » 

46 6 i? *a 
33 1026 14 
15 855 42 

23 883 34 
36 823 44 
41 .60? 90 
46 79.1 52 
15 77.8 53 

24 908 81 
29 103.9 13 
24.1063 8 . 
17 967 23. 

50 82.0 46 
10 993 17 . 
26 109 4 5 

638 — WIS SB 938 58 


em PW rac Mgd 
Gea Port Hdrtty Mgd 
GenPoft rraa ftqrton 
ran ftrt rauon Mgd 
ran-P m Ssmora frind 


5.11 1265 963152 923 HQ 
536 167.0 885 68 963 75 
5T? 155:1 982 87 973 35 
505 mO. 983 64 964 52 
581. 129.7 973 125 907 135 



Ben Pwl tabnllBp&B Cm 5.19 1037 973 flfi 885 <50 

Gen Port Ugd S» 237fr 984 76 953 62 

Gen Ftat fr« HM Mpf 536 I853 965 160 882.144 

ran ran RbMM ,M4 -M97. 983 B3 B83 2S 

Geo Rm RotbttMd Mb* 5-04 1298. 993 38 96.4 52 

Gen Pan S hwy . .536 1155 987 55 927 112 

Greiton (Uanced Rf &I4 111.4 968 153 93.7 93 
557-8 87.6 125 91.4 127 
.'Item-re raKUgn 581-258 0 98 5 69 1009.17 

HmtenHnMgd 625 3429 98.4 76 853157 

WS frteBBBd field 1 '487 I3J>3 TOO? 11 10l 7 10 

WS Manaoptf Rred 2.. .439 134? 1001 15 103? 8 

WSamriM wagedSransA551 «00 98.0 99 931 107 
HMWWrart T« Ex Ugd I 4» 13?? WO? 12 104.1 5 

Wrife.lttd - .• SOS 1178 994 28 TtJl5 13 

Ua^balMiRagetf3 450 «i.i 997 ia 9w 33 

MUtlMOteel 5.0? 1378 993 22 1002 20 

hohUalMraportontt 438 1513 993 22 1K.4 9 

Mh UaUreSoomir SM WO 100.8 8 101.1 14 

LshmShi Jmr utmnMf.Sr- c S g-J RJ 9»8 J20 

t rewman wp Mreaged-to: 5.0Q 20?3 97.8 115 953 H) 

■{MMH Trt AetaM S#r 439 1203 963 43 94 a 83 

£5 105 85? 77 

Ute fi freer He* 030 3945 993 17 lOTifl j 

wrifi.ranmMgita 501 sros wi ra wa « 


UenyUgd 


5.00 3528 08 6 64 99? 23 


Liberty Sana Seaeris 'A 532 4243 1022 


Tnurotod Outrteu 
TR Qobal Tetfttoloity 
TR OwewK Gtt 
TR Wwfttwnte Spec Srts 
Traon 

TSB totorawral 
Ward icy foTBirataiji Ctt 
WitrOSta infemawoal 
t Wright SeJrpnro Im Gtt 
YUTTJ totenupoml Gwth 
Sector Amage/Totals 


559 <925 =9 0 17 — 

73 15 £01 153 97 T tt 
Ul 67 50 95J 105 984 3l 
70Z 39 6J 95 4 105 1053 7 

6 ->9 1761 97) 31 fla 4 IIJJ 

SCO 4032J 952 74 W6 95 
*:q 7??l 94 4 107 *99 33 
653 4313 at: 134 864 114 

<77 10640 9T2 t£0 *79 106 
609 £404 f6t «5 913 67 
6.10 — 963 153 914 148 


EUROPE 


1 MM Brt UK Es«c Eeaures 587 35W KKia 5 
VULA UK SmaBer Compancs GO? 2189 &=3 57 
frigiTiy Smatai Comtanes 6 Tt 5)49 r « ’ j *7 
TMurray Ufr. Glh f Jl yjy 575 fi3 

f PEA Consoenee 6 ?) ‘.2 33 S7? IBs 


KU SmaBer C« 

NOTJBCtl UK Fg Clh 
Nmnch UK Smir Cos 
Peart Stt 

Pe*i UK Small Cos Act 
fcmbrakc Find 
PrtaHlwi UK CW 
t Pmcraal Tiocr 
t Prairie fitwc Site 
Prav Can UK Etyeiy 
f Pro* Mulri Eptai 
t FWuge UK Egulr 
Regency Orach Gm 
RMnce 

Robert Fraser Gm 
Royal Lite Equity Gtt 


6 It 5349 942 1*7 £57 181 
fJl 748J 975 £3 961 IT 
52 33 97 3 10 * o:i SB 
t95 Jje, gyg 


Abbey Gawal Rnsr.-e 
A«»T Gill fi Face frit 
Abtrttt Grit fi FI 
a curd Fined Iraereci 
Acuma irate* LnUrSd &H 
AErnj Proterenci 
ASuxt Pansar Gml Sec s 
Aardive Uni G.lt 4 Fi 
Ifr-'mge Snort Dated Gift 
Caiei- rtei 4 F I 
Clcmra Gni fi H Inc 
Ctanfail an 6 Fried lilt 
CU Get i Fucd htercs 
Eagle Siu Uk Purl & Fi 
Eft*atoti Gill fi Fi 
E»nty i Law Gdi fi rl 
Ftaiiity Gat fi Fuei) Ini 
Frrwes Frey fued Im 


020 9461 1C03 9 103 6 ? 

567 1l?5 100 9 9 94 5 14 

619 1807 1005 19 7*3 45 

599 4*90 983 44 — 

539 5166 99.0 <1 — 

5.56 103.6 995 36 7e< <7 

<05 29.40 1006 19 919 Z> 

360 SOW 100 9 9 Sra3 3 

14* 5841 toi l £ J079 J 

477 3473 974 45 8*4 33 

5DI 3349 100.3 3* 884 33 

600 3363 99 1 39 B32 43 

5*5 <441 100 5 22 039 3J 

582 5136 99 5 36 87 9 36 

499 <777 9S9 St 85S 39 

SOI 6048 100 7 15 94? 14 

14* 2323 1C06 13 9S 1 \6 

510 11363 1004 27 5T 7 24 ; 


| INTERNATIONAL EQUITY INC 

Ahtfusl Intanawiiral Inc 6 32 *37’ eu 1 19 g9 3 II 

Acgfr BSlone Fnnb Ire Port 599 <605 97 7 4 S8 5 i< 

Baidan Urn toll tac 62S 40 g 7 ’ ip asa 15 

Biwtn fewrat Gtt 537 P);t 937 3\ 75 j ;n 

C<grO htra m t a nal me S7S 65 QO S8 6 1 IC30 3 

cteratei taM toil Ins £99 2245 94 J 19 65* 16 

T Dunecm me 598 1E53 S*4 13 99* 3 

FfiC Eimwrjn l"c 6 50 1009 578 3 10* 7 J 

FSC OiCteOS frtt €47 6549 9*4 13 fijj 13 

&edum Tnrsreuoortal fre 653 2625 M4 17 *93 n 

GT totomanarta lnc 595 £6 72 969 12 925 19 


Abbey Eutocerei Ganu 
Abner Euro wan 
Airtmsl European Ire 
Aruina Euooen 
Aetna Euqoean Gtt 
AEna Ktenai Gtn 
ASreC Dutlur Emreeai 
Bcrcte/S Utii Euraiwan 
Banng Ewnoea.i Gth 
Ear**] Eieooean Smn Cos 
EHi court UK & Eumoon 
EG Euraoe 

Brown Shratey tiswean 
Eroon Sregiev Genran 
Cainth European 
Carattiitv Euokxi 


593 1083 98! <9 106.3 88 

633 94JO 975 61 1240 (1 

6 32 91.46 96 7 85 124* 10 

5*9 49 73 990 29 — 

570 2082 99? 22 127* B 

6 30 6727 97 * 58 100.1 106 

556 2900 997 14 112* so 
623 107 6 96.0 100 104.7 95 

571 204 B 97 8 55 113.6 44 

571 2024 98 6 39 1069 82 

498 3415 918 115 84.1 108 

600 Zf£7 ago 29 1321 2 , 

661 2597 990 ?9 114 3 38 1 

672 4398 101? 2 1M.9 5 , 

050 7620 97 6 SB 113.7 41 1 

600 7138 96B TO T1’8 47 


Hjmoras Amman Eertv toe 575 5743 gre a *74 jo 
hroderron Giori tac fi Gm 6 39 694B 97< a 977 9 


C«wa House Eurooero Gth 600 34 48 97 3 65 1083 76 
Cuyra 19 S 2 Eire swe Ores 650 72flt 98 4 43 1190 20 

C*rra Euraoean Grn 6 SO 9619 99? 19 119* 18 

On ca Met European Gnth 600 4?*S 970 75 1125 51 

Confoctratirai Eurasian 596 2830 960 100 1048 94 

uawrt EbFTKan 67? 158? 959 104 1020 101 

CU EurtaSM Ctt 600 9*70 97 4 63 1752 fi 

Oimasrorrai Euro Small Cos 2 04 14 & 1 7 99? 19 123.5 13 

Dur.sd .71 Eutiwan Gm 600 204 2 97 6 58 106 8 84 

Ease 5w eurowan Acc 597 1371 970 54 ust 30 


IQ Global lnc 
MS,Ci tairotabonre tac 
Lttrtw Cume tail tac 
MayrKreer Glnri tac 
MBmputrtan Gtobal toe 
Motand Mandun tac 
rm Bm Giotui tc 
Murray fflyirwuS tac. 
Tisge! V.toiie.mte Ira: 
Sector Aronge^Tobta 


659 1885 SP5 7 7 

5<3 7250 97 3 9 372 5 

580 54.33 ?7fi 5 9*0 4 

6S3 WC1 ’>»» 2 j37 13 

600 5056 35.1 13 871 31 

6<9 HMD 572 IB *4 6 19 

fiij 6657 G 15 657 17 

6*1 4412 9:6 Ip CJ2 fi 

665 £459 975 5 8 

6.1B — 56.1 22 91? 22 , 


INTERNATIONAL FXD INTEREST 


Dur.sd.Tt Euraoean Gm 600 204 2 97 6 58 106 8 84 

Ereie 51* Eimwan Are 537 1371 975 54 1156 30 

EFM Euiolund 5.76 39.03 985 4? 118.4 21 

erglisn Pust 5cmdma-ia 5.45 90.03 1004 6 114? 39 

EqtfaUe European 500 63 68 971 G9 1092 G9 

Earn i Law Eurote 6*2 ffiJ4 99 2 22 1157 28 

Wefrty European 607 1300 1015 1 115.4 31 

Friny European Inc 593 33 rS 932 22 109.1 70 

fifthly /ttr ISS2 Euro Ores 609 4550 1009 4 116.1 26 

Frrewmqion C«ki 5m Ore 549 4930 887 36 _ 

FttyThiMf. Ewapcar. S9I nj? %g 7B 12?7 14 

Fnercs Prov hra Glh 600 108 71 968 82 1167 23 

ISH®**®" 601 3477 989 33 1240 II 

GAM 1 Eiaww lnc 6.00 15045 <394 17 10l.« 103 

Gcttnoro furOTjn 192 75.*5 « 7 85 108 8 72 


FacMjun Evepon 
Fnerau Prov Ewi Glh 
T F5 EuiCOtm Gm 
GAM ■ Eutow tnc 
Gdtflnoie furrcn 


Gamwe Eaonean SH Opps 5*7 1&61 99.1 25 1163 24 


Gjrtmora Profaenre sgaie *51 ?2<5 9<l 55 72.7 51 


•j.00 M 77 9a I *4 862 SS 

«00 9T13 9.T 12 T7 |4* 

1191 %7 140 87? 73 

f«l 5194 991 J) 

565 94Q1 (19 J |3 950 W 

*52 51 (17 DP.9 36 334 28 
€01 HH?S 913 igA 
6 13 IM9 95 4 171 . *06 *4 

6'- J l E!43 975 3J 898 55 

5?7 trC '37 7 82 87? 78 

6 « 222.6 994 J4 __ 

600 5?92 5'J3 29 go? 47 
591 147 1 %n 131 fi -, , M 
539 13*5 956 1w 744 166 

601 140 8 978 76 *5.4 96 


GRE GiS fi FI 
Graf him Gin 

Herawwi Finn; Warart 
HiltarrvKI Pref i Cm 
ml Samuel ©11 6 FI toe 
Hu'brrn Pienaer lnc 
K3 Gil Vicfrf 
Kny enrs & fi 
legal fi Gaient Fried w 
lerui fi General utt 
m(t GO! & H tie 
rJanjite sei & FI 
Mjnufrle High 'rreidmn Wl 
Me ratty GJl 
Mneuiy K»jh inleret 
Mnaand Ldi fi FI 

»sa Bra g.u 


503 1H1 EOS 33 S67 ■) 

300 65.78 W.6 54 905 29 

594 <9.74 100.9 3 9J.1 M 

745 4J3 9S 6 52 77 0 48 

3 74 22S0 57 2 47 84 2 4’ 

568 <139 W4 38 88* X- 

531 101.7 1008 14 938 17 

549 6470 997 34 880 35 

5 99 4351 100.2 31 90.4 S) 

549 79:58 IOC? 28 92.8 2l 

4 05 56 50 101 3 2 *52 13 

511 1312 1«lb 22 WO 5 

510 62.00 991 39 9*S 6 

5 10 8 3 49 1012 4 92* 17 

600 A380 1009 9 333 7 

4 24 <976 1005 22 938 17 

519 2382 «»7 15 910 27 


Abbey Worldwide Rtwo 5 7J 1959 986 5 916 7 

Cannon tat'l Cunrocv 5ond 581 4693 100 7 1 57B 2 

C-ty Frn BecfrmarHnt Crenel 0 04 5830 “9 0 * ?t6 7, 
CU WofktmdF. Bard S99 <55? 97 7 TO F= 5 TO 

FnteiAv iMsmngnal Sori 539 £427 96S IS *76 w 

TF5 Cbunl Bond 600 235< 933 3 5u 9 

Gartmcrs tall Fried no 505 22<7 99* 2 320 5 


Caret! European Gm 
Gxcj German Horizons 
GRE European 
Gtecham EiriKtean Gm 
Greand Euwoean 
GT Eutocwi 
GT r>rounv 


*«9 7394 94.4 112 106 6 66 
628 49 58 190? 8 — 

549 368? 97.7 57 193? 99 
653 2690 96 3 93 101.3 104 
506 155 7 963 94 106 7 65 
Bit 41560 966 87 1098 66 
5*£ 109BO 989 33 1252 B 


j FAR EAST EXCLUDING JAPAN j 

! Abbey Asa Paolic 800 153* 103? 2 139* 1 

AOfrna F* East Emr Gere 663 64*5 986 40 12?2 7 

Bug East 6.19 1440 1016 * 1204 II 

BG Pacific 5 JJS (31.57 99.4 22 109? 25 

Ctenri Med Dragon Gtt 650 39 J 4 99? 26 1136 18- 

EFI* PaofiC. 5*3 4439 96S 35 12 B 3 12 

Rdttey Asean 625 2499 Wl* 8 — 

FrtHn SE Asa 853 73?) 1005 15 122.1 .8 

GntmoK Hong Kong 621 4499 99?'28 1232 8 

Ganmwe Pasta Gtt 59? 10249- HE* S 1314 3. 

Hendeson Hang Kong 639 7341 99* 21 107.4 29 

Wndenon Sag & Matty 653 615 -100* 12 107.8 - 28 

James Cari Tiger tadre 6 J 0 97?* 98* 33 — 

Mattestn SE Asa 650 57?8 993 25 1072 30 

Ifcnuy (fete 828 58.86 985.38 930 32 

MUflDd UandaiM 650 7123 991 30 1127 20 

WM Bm Hong hong - 6.41 33.11 1008 14 124? 5 

bm Bm SE AaJ. 5*7 1524 992 28' 120.1 13 

M*fr 8 rt Srogawe Aaaan 675 6142 98* 32 119.1 14 

Worgro Giro Asian Trader 640 9910 972 38 —' 

NU ftigwra & Uabysaa 675 T40D' 990 31 1141 17 

NteWCh Unon SE Asian 600 11575 1021 6 1Q8L4 24 

PBoebBl Asoa Smfr h&ts 650 5338.103.1 3 . — 

Prov Cao Emag Asa 677 111.4 1007 13 1218 9 

prm Cap Hong Kong 6?7 4853 96* 39 W87 27 : 

Prav Cm Thaund 673 7532 99.4 22 — 

Roval Lonrton Fir Eror Gth 603 .5422 till* 8 — I 

Rpyd Trust PPT Hong Kong 52? 4795 98.8 33.137.6 2 
Royal Tito PPT Srrg & Malay 52Z 73.68 102* 4 128* 4 
Royal Tmst PPT TbataPd" 521 8652 HM5 1 _ 

SfiP SE Asa Gtn 5*9 2721 894 22 1152 tfr 

Schroder tad Parade 5*6 Mil 982 26 106.0 31 

Schroder Parte Gtt 599 5360.100.1 18 — . 

SC« &W F» East . 625 40*4 1012 11 1174 15 
sere but Far East 6 .O 1 9G76 TOai 18 1091 26 

Ste«n ta«y Nw Paris 8.13 1719 lOO? 16 11 M ig 

■rnomwtlrir ,624 15277 97.7 37 1103 » i 

TR Far Eara Oops 25.18 100? 16 — ' 

TyflfraH Tflty ta 567 7638 96.4 4l ilia .32 I 

KWnfty Hong tang 6.4S <0?5 100.1 16 1207 10 

WaihevSngdpote AIM Gtt650 4275 101.8 7 1TZ6 Si 

Sector ANaga/TeMi 621 — 188* «' 1H* 3 ? j 


■ramtoft Ue Mead 
M&G Mgd 
Manat*] Ugd 
MM Mgd 
Ml Mgd 
Ml UtT- 

-MIA fan Site Acc 
MU Uanagaf Are 
NEl BBr Cw Growth Ser 
■HEL Bnt Capri Gth 
«a Bra ttacagerd me 
frB. Bra Mgd lnc Sor -B 
NNCCM wvanf 
NM CansoBOce -. 

NM Mgd 
NPI Mgd 

Itfl Omasat Equity 
DIMM MF Mgs 
NUAM StocfcMartrt Mgd 
Psari {Urw Fund) Mgd 
Pnom Wealth Asand 
Mwr Mutual Mgd tw 
Premtam UfeBahnctd 


Prov Cap Entog Asa 
prov Cap Hong Kong 
prav gh Thaund 


tSrSfrnrEM 

SM Mlit Far East 

TR far Eag Oops 
TyndaB Tgj v ta 
KWnflry Hong hong 


PSTOun UM Mgd 556 SK-fiS 

JJ* 5 II 136* *68 S 

Ptynwro Ufe-GTMgd _ S*8 195 n gyre ™ 


2» S? 166 SS7 69 
4.N 5981 968 153 93* 97 
800 5382 990 39 337 » 
"5 69 H7-f« 
6 ® *.T 1044 I 107.1.. 3 
5*0 352* 104.4 1 107 8 2 

tSc ^2 S3 7 ** 99*. 22 
W5 218* 96.0 99 95 j fil 

?Sn IS* £ 2U * “JBW 

f# 135-7 97.1 144 932 104 

4*7 118B. 97.9 105 8 EH 15G 

4SS 112.4 sag 43 WB13G 

4*0 5064 973 115 040 ' a? 

4*4 107? 98? W 1*4 

4*9 5181 981 o> So S 

5S to! - ? SJ-1 w -B3.t 107 

IS 2f° 149 IOQ -0 21 

5*0 9735 97 * 105 95? 77 

SflJ 872 974 135 Ma 70 

Im 5£] K- 4133 n» 

692 485,4 99.5 22 919-117 

|K ^-0 1® 95* 71 

jjs.ttfr 67? 154 
It? 5f - 7 *®8 750 169 


Prate Admfenu5 Mod 
ROIWC BabDCEd Mgd 
Prate Snow Mgd 
Ffrttt Qu tad Mad 
Prov Cap Spec Mtt • 
fttte-CaoUKMgd 
Prowtom Die Una Food 


moMtaciS^ 

FU Opt Mgd 
.Royal Lhifed 
rays Ldn Md 
-ROlrt liver llnd 
S&P Bataboadu* p& . 

Scar Anp Mgd 

San EM Moral 
Sunt Ld* frlgd 
Scar MB Gtt 

isager* 

SsdtPlw Mod 

Sri WdawNBrnd 


195 0 97.5 131 97* m 

Im SS ,3S W 
Ins Ini? 143 WJ'lSO 

10&3 9&2 87 856 158 

«* | ip n 

S m! n? s J g| » 

478 10968 98 5 ffl 947 Si 

IS « wl L 3 
I Si« 25.r^ 

1 if ffl s-“' s 

I® 3w| m ® g? 

isg? Ill If 

fSSS:£3 HI 

Hull 

5-M 345.1 983 » mo .1^ 

Sill 


AUSTRALASIA 


Uta) & General iml Bond 5« CW 075 12 «:? 15 

MGM (rnsmawiul Bond 4*0 <955 ~ h'fr 13 

f.VM Bm tart Bond 5TO 4405 M2 9 t 39 n 


MW Bm tart Bund 5TO 4405 M2 9 11 

Norvwh tall Bond ?» £5^1 &4'7 17 4 ? 17 

Prav Ca Htartdwrte Bond 523 5!£9 577 10 ICO0 1 

Royal Tnat PPrGcbJi Rml S2 51.38 S35 6 Si 5 

GAP Irtfrwocul Bone 5.K l??0 333 3 533 < 

Sun fthant* WortwrCf fioad 61/ 4718 MS 14 693 II 


Wi.flcy Global 9x4 


359 IGJTrO 971 13 £•?.; 10 


WWtngdale US Gov: Eflrd \25 *:«3 964 IB 04 } 


YHDri Uh UX Ettwg C» 600 7427 9fl? 58 912 42 | M FUster GA & R 1007 15 12 1 *“* ** En 0^«« s 5 « — 97* 17 9W 17 


CuntHssMahmEurcpean®h6.5J 7319 95 6 39 111? 54 
Hreitore Farro-an 5 73 «0.0 * 6 .87 113 7 41 

Hmttfls ScmitT.Ttft 5.TO IMS 100.1 « 1085 74 

HBtSerwft Eii»ccwin 6 13 390?3 965 « 1I0.B 57 

Jtracirscn e-aaperei toe 62! 646 954 107 108 7 73 

Herderson Ettreean Sm Cos 6M 1M97 WJ 45 1076 Bt 

Wl Oanarf! Eunpsan 8.4? IM9 971 M 1C81 77 

HcHwm Eur-K-an 650 163.94 97.3 65 194 7 97 

James Cawi Ei=o 5«e Sits 629 85 71 94* 110 1102 60 

jMHa Carrl Eurcgtm Intel 624 130 6 97 4 63 104.4 % 

KBEuRtyaro 5 63 131 a 981 49 IQS? 88 

Kfl Eteopean Scbc 5?l 102-1 971 69 1095 67 


Banteys Dm AusaraSa 
Breng Auwaft 
Gratund Aasvrtan 
Henoeraon h&nta\ 

U&& Pstantar. 

MM Bnr Ausoreon Gtt 
ta* Court AoS Sm* Cos 
NMAusoataa' 

SclTOtor 
Targat Adstnun 
Thwimm Kangaroo 
TyndSB Anflire W» 
Wreffley Myrtafran 
Setter AmagiyTorak 


824 1247 101? 8 ®fl 11 
7.42 8648 1028 4‘ 87? « 
5*0 69,72 1074 S 92* 9 
6.70 HOffi 1071 6 1 

634 121.1 1M3 1 845 0’ 

622 4629 1033 2 .923 3 
M 8 5603 972 13 ,3 

675 1765 101,2 9 91 b 5 

593 1202 994 « go5 ? 

652 7?0a 1016 7 794. n 
63 3!?6 980 ?2 g t J fi 
588 '41.62, 995 10 * 2 * 4 
649 58.19 102.7 3 833 10 
SJ8 -SUO-Mg 


«W *3 J 

S IM II § 

ESP** iiUlli 

fSSM^^" 911 W64 98S 64 S5 S? 

11? g-s-as 

Si 5 mi % 


IK Provtowi Mgd ” 

Bwrt Ugd 

Uc favesa 

tetch UK Mgd ' 

*"ra *tepfl*ut 


*38 1187 mo -| *8 *1 

1564 S 

<80 329.4 « S 8 fr 24 

5838 «? S 954 73 

• *95 32* gg* ~ fig «0 

w ml SI 3? £ » >53 

5JM _ ”1 ® M 2 104 




















THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


MONEY 37 



STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



_ _ 


roflb Lmr Camay' 


jm-- 

IflEh 

jSfiiriT 

MEK 


IB ES3S3EL'JBB m— 


BIS San g Oh m 

»]'« mamm m: 

ss S$ ’ 

K&wBKF 

S&SSK 


IGTTTTVIBai 


IEjSSESHII 

l ETCTTnn.-T^ JI 

ussssasa i 


eesshjsi 

ii'.!,F,!^n*a i 


gg j BS3 i E 

icg^ rGsai i 
IEE3EIEEBI 


lESHHaaaii 


Please lake into account any 

mitt us rig ns 

. Weekly. Dividend. 

Please make a otne ofyoor daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £8,000 in 
today’s pewspaper. - 


18 f4 _ S3 

a 90S 4 jfj 

Its 123 - ?fl 

232 -4 1U 

a . 4i -h • .. 

«§ « _ P11 

jg.jg t 2 I 37 

3S WJ -3 2iJ 

ZZm* ’ll 

£ s a *•' 

S . 317 +2 233 
42S _ 273 

n 43 „ <17 


7E5 79Q -JO 167 
* «7 -7 *7 
IX IX -t SI 

SK.xaa-j <mq 
«8 415 -13 S00 
140 MS -2 SO 

ns 3** r 

377 387 _ tie 


500 502 4 226 
an a* -h «■ 
*150 153 -1 SB 
164 173a. . 103 
173 1B3a_ as 
383 375 +J ian 

m n -i u 

6B 72-2 -<■ 

B» B»#-2DH ?A£ 
343 348 4. 1ZS 
375 383a.. at 
771 778 -20 204 
B3 9TS#._ 399 

ZW 215 -4 15 

443 «52»f2 15,1 

193 198*-2 fi4 
325 355 -3 7.4 

575 680 -5 

345 348#.7 173 

222 . 226 -3 51.9 

444 44B -T5 07 

12 13 „ 197 

415 423 -1 11^ 

455 475 . 159 


BUJUHNG, ROADS 


IX TOAUrey 

504 221 Mb 



Three winners shared the £2,000 Portfolio 
Platiniun prize yesterday. Mr James John¬ 
son, of Suatfora On Avon, Warwickshire, 
Mr Peter Haster, of central London, and 
Mrs A Preece, of Boumemouxii, .Dorset, 
each receive £666.66. ' 


485 433 Boot (Henw 
125 98 Brandon PtC 
IX 124 » Dredging 
123 75 Bnonr 
115 78 CAS 
268 248 OH - 

83 nCriUMRafa 
172 109 Gebpy 

182 & Cootac Em 

110 53 Cooro PIE 

315 229 Cattn 
231 IXCaafrnik 
217 141 CM Mo< 
ibs to Craaby am 
433 285 DnM (BHt 
40u 339 EdnoM HHgi 
75 . 52 Bffl - • 

151 111 Eared ' 

» 12 fiaM SB 

84 SBGaagn 

185 120- dm S Qady 


60 100 _ _ 
218 2251-5 127 

53 57 .. 

132 187 .. 90 

485 473 1 5 117 

203 207*-1 159 

101 108a_ 42 

IT 37 42 -I 25 

173 178 -2 51 

.187 172 -1 179 

.. ISO 154 -10 103 
211 214 _ 14 7 

15 20 — . i 

2a ?isa-5 60 

..:170 .130 _ SI 
•J126 133 -2 84 

-220 225 -S' 147 
. fiD 475 _ 289 

• ‘WS 115 -S 57 
135 M0 _ 93 


WGMHlOUr 
142 ftMm Wood 
100 KaAoo M - 
BD-Hntoft&uH - 
224 Hqaood Wn 
.jaugp-s w 
iSttwGB 
MrtwarlJAM 
' 112 flwatk JaOnun 


SO 85 _ 45 

245 250 -4 
V . a 80 _ 35 

135 145 _ 103 

• SQ SB „ 43 

90 56 _ 53 

£31 265 -a m.3 
145 152 * 2 65 

Ml. 144 -I 107 
, -90 95 _ 50 

-• 375 390 _ 14 IS 

35k 37 „ 25 

•$ li i n 

■: 3 S:{ If 

M ia 130 . 27 

TB 7BB -t-5 110 
137 M7a . 1D.7 

no noa-3 97 

68 91 _ 37 

» 2W 265 -2 167 

382 388 -3 26 7 

54 57 _ 4B 


90 64 36 

117 25 23* 

159 79 » 

4 2 45 56 

26 83 3.1 

51 29 MB 

179 H5 73 
103 U 52 
14 7 *9 55 

.1 .26 
60 26 
SI 05 61 
64 50 91 

14 7 66 76 

289 60 108 

*7 52 124 

93 67 S3 

64 6.7 56 

45 48 51 


•*# Low Cvnre - 


? i@s- 

KGCmaaifWb 


77 67 Dooeng 6 MM 
131 X E1K 

20 Ml 

ia t£ EWranHaSr** 
» 70 tows 
331 212 EtfdtMn 
33 » HO tan 

U5 143 Fjowi EJett 
48 X Fonwa ia) 
iBD 21 Enron Mgs 
SW 349 First Tech 
51 2a Fawred Tuft 
M4 l» «C Ui) 

715 535 tafen ara 
495 ?4J Kaftans Gp 
235 2)5 JM« am 
145 125 SOCK 
348 28Bk Lee RafngMreiga 
83 <9 Led 

102 83 LA) Scam 

358 174 LOW 
313 278 Mura 4 
192 its uenree 
277 213 Mottto ftJBO 
843 448 Mcro Fm 

IX 105 MP 
12 8H Macsa 

183 Ml M** 

28fc im IUK 

78 34 HMMSn 

68 58 Moray Em 

x zb unvcarei 

53*. «h Nmi 
180 •« Ma il lil t ftoaa 
152 85 JiodtmiB 

a 14 Ocwncx 
329 198 0«m ImtlWMB 
280 219 P-E a a m— I 
228 208 PS P 
91 56 Pm. 

105 82n Plhfip* R« 

IS* 79* Pups LHVS N/V 
265 206 Mu 
214'160 DO'S' LU Wfe9 
96 63 Presac 

11? 58 {town 

239 180 RjdJ EM rsa) . 
414 308 Hjc 6 Tdocon (a) 
177 T2fl HOSS 
B5 61 SD-Socoa 
210 188 Sage So 

IS mbhwl 

1B5 148 SCMdS BfP 
830 382 Son Gp 
® 40 Sam 

295 232 SIC (a| 

2BH .21 It TDK 
37 X TalrmOIx 
822 839 THOM E^ s (14) 

X -11 Totcstiom 
195 m fesaii 
198 JTOlfewa 

85 57 UU ficanSc 

315 257 MOM 
66 :a Item SetaMn 
388 303 Wboksah fangs 


Pm Gnu Vis 

Bd Ote CtidgeMg % p* 


10 i2*-l 

473 4S0a-14 
Wl 168 -3 
_3? 31 . 


343 348 -9 
IE) 170*-. 
75 77 _ 

96 100a. 
228 232 *-2 

80 90*-3 
ffi fflr- 
GS 72 -1 

286 275*- 

81 83*4 
178 182 _ 

a 271 -i 
is n _ 
370 3SS} a- 
30 X -1 
ins I«ia-3h 
m mi-5 

358 362*.- 
212 232 _ 
140 IS) - 
395 3S _ 
55 GDa-1 
90 94 - 

198 207 #1 
295 310 -5 
183 192 - 
263 273 -4 
775 TO -5 
127 134a- 

8<t -H 

114 -1 

110 -O 

72 77#- 

53 58 - 

a x -i 


300 ass -10 

250 255 - 

2 m nr. 


. 93 * ii 1,6 

133 26 161 
U5 &2 l?l 
0 7 23 301 

18 26 131 

_ ao 

81 94 120 

17S 51 98 

5.7 3 5 TOO 

34 4 5 116 

13 13 942 

60 36 124 

39 42 102 

i 88 118 i£ 

45 B4 02 
100 37 106 

53 85 EG 

64 36 1^4 

11-6 12 129 

34 77 67 

123 65 94 

60 U IS7 
29 Ofl »j 
107 49 102 

100 GS 
19 J 61 37.7 

19 12 T1.7 

31 34 148 

43 ?1 OB 

128 42 166 
60 4] i?i 

50 19 242 

- 199 

as 68 12J 


62 

65 

-1 

4.4 

60 


80 

85 

_ 

575# 

70 




-k 




260 

270 

f4 

90 

34 


m 

238 

fT 

90 

38 

89 

m 

66 


36 

15 

100 

87 

94 


20 

22 

16* 

187 res 

4H 

28 

?T4 

307 

313#-17 

u 



123 

128 





FO 

B? 

-3 

10 

18 


aa 

207 


83 

31 


1.14 

138#. 

30 

20 

11 s 

U5 

1« 

4? 

104 

69 


va 

536 

-1 

32 

06 

4*1 

5? 

67 

+2 

35 

61 


258 

251 


150 

58 

82 



-k 




77 

29 

41 

07 

25 


7m 

7O0#-11 

400 

57 

102 

1 ? 

14 




135 

1« 


83 

45 


m 

378 

-2 

M 7 

39 


63 

E7#-1 

33 

11 


307 

317 

-3 

227 

73 


rs 

32 




86 

313 

323 

-2 

213 

87 

83 


FINANCE, LAND 


JS-.8U8U:.. 

IWS** 

S ’liMimMiMn 
m r u muuu 
itt 74 nm Tntrer 
14 DP* FDdn 
.186 114 Pimng 
745 S6*nCGdtM) 
IM 88 ft** M 

a SZORKBnlM 
IS Grp*) 
112 09 Stars* IM* 

143 1» EWUI M 
182- 163 Scan (J) 

455.' 346 Mg' 

289. a» .Tanmcw) 
m 79TWHSBW 


217 .163 Tim Mm 
111 80 Try fln* 

aa 272 Tun 

172 125 WKtpfew 
355 220 Waul On* . 

95 48 HM «U 

447 315WUSBH4 '• 

» XWggn 

388 2* Wim Bmdm 

m in warn (Cs«iNr) 

s a ss5sr aw 


s.a.3 

ro sS ■! 

4??g.; , i 

■318.» +1 


-8 168 G 2 9! 

• 2 55 17 4.1 

-I 107 7.1 51 

- SO 54 16 

- MOB- 17 81 

- 25 68 66 

-1 52 81 138 

-3 73 S7 15 

-1 65 542 L2 

•1 53 7 3 93 

27 - -2| 7(5 
+8 110 17 W3 

». 10.7 75 4S 

1-3 17 32 68 

- 37-41 t) 

■2 167 63 SO 

-3 26 7 69 73 

48 88 10* 

+1 - _ 38 

•1 80 6? 63 

-2 33 4 1 62 

„ 173 . 58 85 

+1 100 145 45 

- 33 51 68 

»- US 18 55 

91 47 r02 

-3 85 69 81 

-1 67 65 63 

-1 56 17 45 

-I 215 S3 183 
-1 20 35 82 

+1 220 53 76 

+1. 2S0 8.7 71 

*4 47 50 96 


332 

2B4 Aftagpreft 

315 

E3 


20 

08 

20 Y 

61 

47 Adlan Hume 

<5 

50 


10 

2.1 

136 

46 An KomauH 

43k 

48k 


431 


93 

ISO 

55 AuHoMy M 

110 Bate Pie 

50 

138 

80 

144 

- 

_B 

53 

30 

24 

56 

311 

17B Bowey Gown 

183 

188 





100 

51 ft Commonm (aa) 




irji 



70 

27 Buos Asdnon 

25 

28 

•I 

50 

210 

30 . 

31 

27 crewta 

38 

30 


307 

11 

480 

298 

153 Caodovw 

m 

J45 

•5 

93 

39 265 

81 

42 Cemrcwir 

40 

47#.. 

40 

91 

£0 

•52 

52 SormWi H 




.-I 



SIS 

373 HreutyCTtomma 

3BS 

405 


213 

54 

100 ‘ 

30 

15 reo 

21 

24 


0l7p 

30 

80 1 

113 

91 hay 8 5ane 

90 

95#.. 

77 

S3 188 

S3 

5 UT 

4 

5k 


50 



285 

248 IfauM 

280 

284 

-2 

107 

38 349 

252 

112 ita Home Lane 

JIB 

115 

-2 

113 

101 

74 

55 

37 NMivrta 

38 

41 

fi 




53 

3 PremJi Pie 

4 

6 





1 .120 

90 HA Cup Pnres 

02 

98 

-1 

35 

37 224 

45 

TBRudawTre 

?7 

?? 


11 

30 

82 

a 

81 towimiim Pie 

. 80 

B5 




70 

10 

53 Sager S Fired 

775 Sofijpl 

53 

725 

SS 

825 

-75 

33k 

81 

83 

249 

203 Tenretooa Out# 

225 

230 


- 

- 

* 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


II 


1 2*k 

14k Anareaf Eapnae 

Wl 


• -W 




t 301 259k naan 

27B 

2B0#-5 

77 

20 335 

425 

293 Fran GO 

41? 

427 


I7J 

41 

168 

850 

665 Headmen Adma 

650 

830 


500 

74 

90 

vn 

70S IDITSCO UN 

106 

113 

-2 

80 

72 

ID! 

206 

107 MAI 

111 

114 


S3 

56 

114 

700 

605 MAM 

610 

630 


300 

40 

108 

49 

394 MS O' 

430 

4X0 


207 

48 

163 

129 

77 Stotfi Ww DM 

122 

127 

-1 

4G 

32 

53 

- go 

6? TgnsuB mge 

65 

68 


7J 

109 120 

35 

20 Ted InV 

1» 

22 

— 

36 

47.1 

53 


8? 

581 

inr 

-11 

+1 

31.1 

88 

1? 

103 

8.4 

102 

10/ 


5 J 

50 

1U2 

140 

135 

167 


bB 

lUi 

152 


00 

53 

83 

434 

437 

-7 

140 

42 11 1 

355 

ft 

-3 

150 

68 

8t 

100 


5h 

54 

4.1 

265 

i/o 

-7 

120 

45 100 

£ 

!«s 


<77 

74 

63 

215 


H) 7 

51 

95 

77 


_ 

SU 

WO 

4J 

317 

•t 

200 

6? 

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1J3 

1*7 


48 

33 

71 

215 

235 


9b 

43 

82 


43 

-1 

25 

54 

94 

440 

•1 

t15 

-1 

.101 

20 154 

SB 

305 


33 

76 

171 

175 

•1 

4b 

2.7 

0b 

fflU 

J3 

■7 

14 U 

60 

71 

91 

34 

- 

67 

72 

64 


CHEMICALS, PLASTICS 


173 WMCUUk 
401 268 JWkBfam_ . 

IK issrn 

llBto 91 toy* MOO 
U4 188800*9 
187 125 BU Ctam 
540 !@9 &W 6o_ . 

ZX 196 Cmag {#). 


'154 157a-3 
318 324S-2' 
45 47. -1 

170 173 r-2 
9n -«• 
187 191 -1 
160 183 -1 
20B-2U -I 


43 28 1*2 

157 49 97 

19 41 7.4 

105 61 92 


Creng(W) 

193 

Iff) 

-4 

95 

48 

91 

Cmda 

172 

175 

-1 



98 

EH* i Ewj« 

ITS 

182 




0b 

Etrapew CMV 

15 

J6k 


08 

50 

14 J 

Enp* 

m 

13?#-3 

BJ 

b« 

103 

FusacO 

215 

2?0 

■2 



70 

Vtoawd Itonto) 

1B8 

1«S 

•2 

130 

6H 

60 

Ffatow 

173 

1/5 


107 

61 

7.3 

Huecfea Meo 

09k 






imp Orem taH®a) 

10 

TOk 


733 

71 

77 

«J|»* W 

aa 

533 

-3 

fin 

*1 

13b 


3*B 

353 

+1 

90 

27 Mo. 

Nook Hyte 

18k 






Pirw, n 

174 

m 

-2 

4? 

37 

H.7 


197 

2U0 

-? 

30 

IB Ml 

BefldTe Stidnim 

157 

152 

-J 

27 



wamto Story* pfc 

300 

3H) 

•rr 

18 7 

61 

lb* 


286 

3U5 

■5 

Il7 


B0 

vowrenCtore 

413 

470 

-17 

173 


Tin Cam 

117 

120 

■2 

60 

50 

85 



DRAPERY, STORES 


UNDATED 
KA 20% Conttfci 
61% 55% Com 
41 33% Con** 

25*i 30% Tr#a* 
ad 97'v Tr««* 
38% 28* VW U» 


2%% 22« 

3%". 57*1 

«% 3S‘i 
SKI. 22S 
3*k. 27% 
37i' a 32% 


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150 IX BAF In* IX 

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17k ID «B 10 

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323 137 ABA 160 

5*» 45 APB 

157 113 APV 111 

297 240 AS* 267 

97 X AUSHW 48 

178 11)1 Ablest , 113 

70 46 Aenmnce Enp 80 

229 176 MBOMB urw* 222 

257 163 Abuse 2U0 

m 366 Auto bid 363 

46k 35k Amur 35% 

!?7 95 ASB 6 LWV 117 

S tolnfttn 3s 

5W 401 few toner »r 

ICG 81 Avrun Mot S3 

IX 145 BEA 168 

27B 284 BET M (M) "« 

290 223 BU Gp 2® 

611 497 90C IM] Mi 

75 49 KG 46 

395 349* 855 Gm* 355 

473 382 BTR (41) 384 

320 286 BW 7M 

54k Olt 45% 

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7H 1% 0*8 iWi) 30 

970 488 Billow AM X9 

260 166 63HW (HI 162' 

43 X Barnes (Cnafa) X 

210 175 0M*m ' ISO 

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159 ISSttUt 125 

IX IDS Man |JJ 1TB 

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270 m m Pnrmm 235 

150% IZ7% Bi 5W I33k 

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216 161 Br V42 IX 

478 309 Bitten HH 462 

lEF-Brenvm W» 145 
32 25k Breern in 27 

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M3 102 Bmuh IX 

110 50 CH 1*3 47 

43 X 0 Corel a 

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12% 6% Cauicon 

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132 10 s OBnaeno * HiS 
475 39 CBPBJ OXB 
9k 9k QawtJO 
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413 Z74 Ctracs IV 
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775 215 Cuyw Sea 
925 fiOOCoaaniA) 

228 195 Caimumy Hn^rfal 
392 260 Caramnc 
71 45 Cm Sammy 

329 257 COM (Wml 
350 172 CwkTO iui 
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234 107 Corn 

400 2S8 CouitoMn tol 
170 67 Casrtnsv Pspe 
fDk oi> CeuniHii 
50 11 comt De Groat 

BI 33 boa 
22k 18k Dias 
ac 217 fam & Mel V 
173 131 Cams rsooiev) 

264 182 Day 
313 207 De U flue 

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270 159 Otfana 

98 73 Ootwan Roll. 

119 98 aurtfl 

178 IM Ovwa IJ4J) 

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14 MO S3 

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151 47 90 

55 35 110 

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80 119 90 


INSURANCE 


1 Aim & Ain 

4 Am Gen 

5 Aicta |AJ| 

8 Sr*»mfc 

9 Bntjmc 

2 Con Drum Co] 

7 Gen tenant m) 

3 GRE (mi 
9 Hu* C E 
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3 PKfi 

3 Pnjdenlal (ul 

9 Rouge 

3 Royal tu) 

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3 Svgr Kegs 
? Sun AUoncs (aa) 

> Sun Life 
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1 wdLs Fuer laa) 

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IT -k 
24k *-«• _ 

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738 ?4S - 10.7 

710 715 +1 277 
475 476 4 2S7 

72 90 -4 

<98 50? . S3 

214 217 *2 15 3 
477 *aga-4 ms 
155 IX r _ 9 J 

393 JM +1 ?I1 
XI 333 -12 Z2.7 
315 ITS _ 85 

346 3» 0 18.1 

Xk a^t ~ 

T7 82 _ 87 

25 227 .1 123 

675 682 -3 323 

441 448 -1 MO 
?2& 222 -1 IB0 
270 277 _ 14 7 

730 217*_ 207 

XI 304 -6 167 

likr _ 590 

115 120 „ 20 

233 237 3 160 

W X fl _ 


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LEISURE 


296 214 Anglia TV A' 

190 177k Ban & WA A* 
495 415 Bok*v & Howes 
376 235 Brenr WiAe 

95 77 BuNKtom IM 

23E 160 Canoan 

259 132 Canal RaO» 

813 <14 Coun Com* 

458 3*8 CasO* Cooun 
78? CS6 Cmm Til 

147 105 Cmysais 

148 fl C.kVisan 
390 305 Compass Go 
11’, 925 Euro Disney 

94 43 Euro L*iur 

T2S 193 l«« Lcew« 

43 68 drrennan 

IX 95 HIV Glare 
2*5 155 Hemvrgei Brooks 
67 55k funEf 

96 68 LWT CP 

176 56 Mecca 

163 108 MOsummei 
67 41 Owns Anna! 

91 17 to,won Lecug 

193 X Ouasaol Groua 
241 :ifl He*v Uses ul 
510 *65 SUITV 
2*9 183 Starfey Lmm 
lM 85 TVS 
* e: i5w 
555 46J Tnan*u IV 
121 X Tonuinam Kttsu 
2l8 158 TV AM 
410 ?60 Tvnj Tees TV 
152 127 Ulsar TV 
33 15 Veto Sim Gp 

106k 8? Warmer 

114 328 Vurtsm TV 
156 IX Zaram Gp 


20? 297*_ 
165 180*.. 
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266 269 -6 
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212 217 • 2 
183 185 _ 
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375 390 _ 
7IS 720 0 
103 107 a-I 
9? 95 3 

360 365 -8 
950 9GS -15 
44 47 ft 

23 226 1 -t 

00 62 -k 

111 111 -2 
110 180 - 
55k - 56k _ 
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78 79 _ 

1 1 ? 122 _ 
60 62 _ 
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141 145 _ 

14 15k ^ 
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20 O 80 
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4.7 50 79 

60 71 144 


27 26 151 

151 S3 7£ 
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12k 


27k 

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IFk 

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152 

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4*4 196 £ 0c«a 
731 293 EUMsraM 
135 40 E«wg 
342 137 E tood Goia 
399 90 E Runs Pico 

10k 418 F5 Com 
2*8 10J FS Dev 
2t<k 10 CfSA 
*5 37 Gcemr Tn 

242 146 Gew 
6? 30ii GM Utgoorf 
43 »9 Greemncn Rea 

202 67 Groom*, 

876 32* Harmony 
663 rUS Karins 
14k 6 1 . Unss 


0M 

469 

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275 

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01k 


Vox Reels 

39k 

41 k 

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377 -16 _ _ „ 

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484 *3 _ _ - 

50 fi _ _ _ 

161 *14 _ _ - 

201 -2 „ .. 

526 -11 _ _ _ 

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312 3S -20 

8k 8k . 


210 62 veacKpml 

6*0 270 We tom 
209 63 Western Areas 

34k 15 Western Dew 

332 193 Weoera Mmng 
22k BkWnkcS 
2B 16 Tamm Career 
105 50 Zantben 


67 X +2 
309 326 -11 
86 102 414 
18 18k -k 
227 m -I 
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© Tines Nrwsfafien Limited 

WEEKLY DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required for+181 points 
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58 

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IH 

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135 

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SHOES, LEATHER 


76 

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32 

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156 LamnrO Hum ill 

IBS 

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300 Slyto 

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TEXTILES 


2B 

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196 

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375 

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NEWSPAPERS, PUBLISHERS 


128 65 Fwfcr Worm) 

178 159k Gisiafl 

92 69 Hrtmg PwletOSt 

lM 91 Jerane i5) 

319 267 Lamsm 
2m ire Lee*; 

126 66 Lraer 

59 « L«i (S) 

1G0 100 F*U4nd X 

56k 49 HudUA 

76 52 StET 

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45*. 34 samunl 

338 258 TDtnknsens 
ID?r 77 lowal 
17 7 Weil Trust 

23) 179k Vnuvae 


31 55 _ 7 3 

163 170 ., Ill 
7? 7f r-1 27 

104 !1J fl H2 
315 317 -1 150 

187 147 -1 117 

16 70 fl 27 

44 46 _ 50 

97 102 _ *9 

49 fO -•* 45 

MM. 71 


79 80 +2k 68 

6k . k -*t 07 

100 150 _ 120 


74 13k S 
17k 13k 5W TT 
162 a SwTaw 

60 x Sam* Garron (0 
172 133 Scapa 
120 6? Sire HareuiB 
086 685 S*CtlKM 
693 617 00 A- 

S ai 5euamaid 
503 5eta»*v S«v 
B5k 45 Smre Eoo 
111 M&olB* 

153 IZB SCO- 
530 «10S«WCB1 
88 75 SJonra 

412 314 Smon Ei* 

258 216 Smdw |Wm) 

115 89 5 is Hiama 

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-16 


g& money 

Edited by Jon Ashworth 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 4 1990 


Weekend Money 


Cash flow need 
behind launch 
at Laurentian 


Rupert Bruce outlines the merits of regular saving 


Trusting in a little but often 


Skipton 
top in 1 


By Barbara Ellis 

TIMES are hard for unit trust and one-twelfth of that, or 


companies. Price listings show 
. that many trusts are now 
Quoting on a “bid" basis, 
meaning that their prices are 
based on the lower end of their 
permitted range and generally 
reflecting that more investors 
arc selling than buying. 

The trusts also face the 
prospect of their funds under 
management dwindling as in¬ 
surance companies seek to 
minimise their tax bills by 
switching from units into 
direct holdings of shares. 

Regular injections of cash 
become the unit managers' 
ideal in circumstances like 
these and Daniel Godfrey of 
. Laurentian Unit Trust Man¬ 
agement acknowledges that 
cash flow was a substantial 
part of his group's motivation 
in launching its Capital Trans¬ 
fer Account this week. 

Lauremian'5 account takes 
a minimum investment of 
£1.000 into the group's cash 
trust, which bas no initial 
charge, but an annual manage¬ 
ment fee of0.4 percent. 

Each month, one-twelfth of 
the amount in the cash trust is 
transferred into one or the 
group's eight trusts, which 
range in size from the £5 
million American Under¬ 
valued Assets Trust to the £16 
million European * Under¬ 
valued Assets Trust 
The £1,000 minimum is 
twice Laurentian's normal 
level for initial investments 


RISING 
OIL 
PRICES I 

How can you 
benefit? 

Ring our free Moneyline 
from 9.30 a.ra.- 5.30 p.m, 

7 days a week, on 

0800282101 



I THE INVESTMENT HOt SE ■ S 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■I 


£83.33, is just over three times 
the £25 the group usually 
accepts in regular monthly 
investments. 

Mr Godfrey explained that 
the higher levels had been set 
because of the extra work 
involved: “A minimum of 
£500 would have cost us 
money. Administratively we 
couldn’t run it," he said. 
However, Mr Godfrey con¬ 
cedes that there was nothing to 
stop investors putting just 
£500 into the cash trust and 
feeding £25 a month into 
another trust, though they 
would have to remember to 
instruct the group each time. 

He said, though, that the 
group would accept a series of 
post-dated instructions. 

Investors who review past 
performance at Laurentian 
will find a mixed picture. The 
group's Growth Trust bas 
shown a rise of 267 per cent 
over the past five years, 
ranking top in its sector. 

But in the last year, its. 
Japanese Undervalued Assets 
Trust has dropped by 12.2 per 
cent and the Undervalued 
Assets Trust by 2.4 per cent. 
Since January this year, the 
American Undervalued As¬ 
sets Trust has fallen by 15.4 
per cent, ranking 116th out of 
132 Kinds. 

Laurentian's launch co¬ 
incided with the withdrawal 
from the market of a similar 
scheme, the Capital Invest¬ 
ment Account, which chan¬ 
nelled money from a Chel¬ 
tenham & Gloucester building 
society account into Mercury 
unit trusts. Launched in Feb-' 
ruary 1988, the C&G/Mercury 
account had attracted 1,200 
investors with less than £5 
million. 

The interest rate on the 
building society account was 
lately an uncompetitive 8.16 
per cent, against the expected 
net yield on Laurentian's cash 
trust of 10.7 per cent. 

A C&G spokeswoman said 
that the account had been very 
costly to administer and as 
part of its simple, focused 
approach, the society had 
decided to drop it. However, 
as the agreements ran for two 
years, some investors may 
hold the account until 1991. 


THAT private investors buy 
at the top of the stock market 
and sell at the bottom is a sad 
but true City cliche. 

One of the best ways to 
avoid the problem is to put a 
regular amount in a unit trust 
or investment trust each 
month. 

A regular savings plan has 
two merits. It removes the 
problems of when to invest 
and through a device called 
“pound cost averaging,’’ it 
ensures that shares or units are 
bought cheaply. 

Roger Jennings, marketing 
director of unit trust manager 
M&G Securities, said: “We 
are very keen on regular 
savings plans and we think 
they arc very useful for the 
investor." 

“Pound cost averaging" re¬ 
sults in shares or units being 
bought at below the average 
stock market price, something 
which requires good judge¬ 
ment and luck if investing 
money in a lump sum. 

If a regular sum is invested 
each month, obviously more 
securities are bought when the 
price is low than when it is 
high. So, the average price 
paid is lower than the average 
price of the unit or share over 
the existence of the saving 
plan. 

Nicholas Prowse, a director 
at Fleming Investment Trust 
Management, thinks invest¬ 
ment through regular savings 
plans reduces the risk of 
equity investment 
The 1990 sales figures for 
Flemings' Investment Trusts 
Savings Plan illustrate the 


Tke. FLeminj mefKod depervds^fcovjfse 
oa kAoco'ir^ ft> p u l\ \-\kq handle 



foolishness of most investors. 
While this savings plan is 
designed to take both one-off 
lump sum investments and 
regular savings, sales fluctuate 
widely to follow the latest 
fashions. 

More than £2 million was 
invested during January, as 
investors moved in after a 
British stock market rally over 
Christmas and the New Year. 
Since then, sales have dropped 
to £1.5 million a month. 

Mr Prowse said: “Time 
after time we are seeing people 
who are only buying because 
they see that equities have 
gone up. Their confidence gets 
shattered when they go down 
and they often sell." Accord¬ 


ing to Mr Prowse, the advan¬ 
tages of regular savings are 
much greater in a volatile 
investment, like the Fleming 
Japanese trust than a stable 
one, like the group's High 
Income trust. 

“The more volatile the 
stock market, the greater the 
advantages, because the 
greater is the damage from 
investing at a peak," he said. 

Investment products are 
normally launched at a time 
which their managers consider 
apt for investment 

And just to show that even 
the professionals get it wrong, 
Fleming relaunched its sav¬ 
ings plan in August 1987. 
Stock markets around the 


.world crashed on Black Mon¬ 
day that October. 

M&G has carried on 
marketing through booming 
and bottoming stock markets, 
while other groups step up and 
cut back on marketing accord¬ 
ingly. Asa result Mr Jennings 
has not witnessed investors 
buying at market peaks and 
selling in troughs. 

It also has lower charges 
than many unit trust groups. 
Five percent of an investment 
is taken as an initial charge 
and a further one per cent is 
taken in annual management 
charges. 

These charges apply to the 
unit trust manager’s monthly 
savings scheme as well as its 


personal equity plan (pep) 
savings scheme, which has all 
the advantages of the normal 
one, and also allows an invest¬ 
ment of up to £3,000 a year 
free of all tax. The dis¬ 
advantage is it can only be 
used to invest in six ofM&G’s 
26 unit trusts. 

Those with 50 per cent or 
more of the fund invested 
overseas cannot be sheltered 
by the pep lax umbrella. 

Fleming's charges are even 
lower than M&G’s. The 
investment trust manager 
takes 1 per cent when an 
investment is made and 
charges operating expenses to 
the trust. . 

Fleming also has a pep. It 
takes 1.5 per cent when an 
investment is made and 
charges an additional 1.75 per 
cent stockbroking com¬ 
mission. In its case, only four 
ofthe 12 investment trusts are 
eligible under the 50 per cent 
rule. 

Mr Prowse regards the 
Fleming investment trusts 
savings scheme as an ideal 
vehicle for someone saving for 
a specific purpose. He thinks it 
a good way to save for 
retirement, or perhaps to buy 
a car for a child's ISlh 
birthday. 

But while regular saving 
removes the problem of when 
to invest, it leaves that of 
when to selL 

Mr Jennings said: “The one 
thing you have to keep your 
eye out for is to sell when the 
market is high. You should 
wait until the newspapers are 
saying it is high." 


the big 
league 


By Rodney Hobson 


Double result from SIB tipsheet swoop 


By Tony’ Hetherington 


OFFICERS from the Metropolitan 
Police fraud squad investigating an 
alleged restaurant guide swindle have 
been questioning a man who was 
detained by Securities & Investments 
Board officials carrying out a separate 
enquiry into a rash of unauthorised 
investment tip-sheets. 

SIB officials have been concerned 
for more than a year at the appearance 
ofhigh-priced investment newsletters, 
firstly from an address in the West 
End of London and more recently 
from Rivington House, a small office 
building in Great Eastern Street, on 
the edge of the City. Rivington House 


offers offices on short lets or acts as an 
accommodation address. 

Under the Financial Services Act, 
anyone offering investment advice, 
either directly or through a specialist 
newsletter or publication, must be 
authorised by the Securities & Invest¬ 
ments Board or one of the watchdog 
self-regulatory bodies such as Fimbra. 

The newsletters. W.D Gann Invest¬ 
ment Research at £150 a year. Insider 
Dealer at £200, and, more recently, 
Paragon Options Research at £780 a 
year, were not published by any 
authorised company or individual 

The publishers and managers of the 
newsletters used the names Tony 


Greene, David Briggs, John Cutler, 
and Steven Plumb — though all are 
believed to be the same individual 

An SIB official said investigators 
had gone to Rivington House after 
receiving a complaint from a member 
of the public who had been contacted 
by Paragon Options Research. 

She added: “The investigators re¬ 
alised that the new newsletter had the 
same format as one already under in¬ 
vestigation, called Insider Dealer . At 
Rivington House they met a man who 
gave his name as Steven Charles. 

“He was evasive, and one of the 
investigators recognised him as the 
man who called himself Steven 


Plumb. He was persuaded to ac¬ 
company them to the SIB offices and 
police were called. 

“I do not want to say anything 
about this particular case, but in 
general we would consider prosecu¬ 
tion whenever an unauthorised in¬ 
vestment business is carnal oil" 

Fraud Squad officers confirmed 
they had questioned a man who had 
been sought for some time in connec¬ 
tion with allegations, that hotels and 
restaurants were charged